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Special Issue "Governance, Power and Institutions and Overall Weaknesses of the SDG System: The Public Participation and the Role of Stakeholders"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Simon Bell

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Faculty, Open University, UK
E-Mail
Phone: 07818062177
Interests: He is currently studying the systemic nature of consciousness. With 11 books on his CV Simon has a keen interest in longer forms of output but he has also contributed to various pod casts, videos and graphic forms of output including a comic (graphic novel) on ‘Project Fear'.
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Ioppolo

Department of Economics, University of Messina, Piazza Pugliatti 1, Messina, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +393473603908
Interests: Environmental Management; Industrial Ecology; Environmental Governance; Local Development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Actions to seek "compromise" through stakeholder participation and negotiation is advocated to facilitate the integration of shared interests, knowledge, and values. Participation, one of the five principles of "good governance", through multi-stakeholder knowledge, significantly contributes to improve understanding and increase transparency in the decision-making process. Participation is a core action in a collaborative management process, and uses innovative practices in problem identification, decision-making and action planning. Further, participatory practices allow an ethical operational method of adaptive management and contributes to joint endorsement of common decisions. By working on sustainability topics, by sharing their importance, and by negotiating the ranking of each aspect with the related problem in a participatory way, it is possible to establish a voluntary aggregation of local and external actors (e.g., policy makers, stakeholders, citizens). Starting from these considerations, participation and advocacy play strategic roles at the local scale but are even more important at regional and global scales.

Today populism, nationalism, and various forms of ethnic exceptionalism have emerged as reactions to globalism and failed experiments in molding regional civic architecture via technocratic diktat. Identity and exceptionalism are the keystones of the anarchic confusion underlying much of the political debate. Few now can make confident statements based on linear projections of ‘how we are today'. The pundits have been proven wrong time and time again and we live in ‘interesting times'. Yet, the need for sustainability on a global scale has never been clearer, the challenge of fracture and the threat of conflict are balanced against the opportunity for localism and the potential for community engagement.
We are concerned to understand the methods, tools, the experiences, useful to build an empowered community of stakeholders, that can play a strategic role in enhancing understanding, generating new options, decreasing hostility and aggressive attitudes among participants, exploring new problem framing, enlightening policy makers, and producing competent, fair and optimized solution packages that also facilitate consensus.

On the other hand, what kind of new concepts and pitfalls are of importance in the light of sustainability, when we promote participation and advocacy?

Into all of this emerges our Special Issue on participation and advocacy. Moreover, this Special Issue is linked to ISDRS Conference 2018, and best papers from the conference will be selected and invited to submit an extended paper within this Special Issue.

This Special Issue is concerned with such issues as:

  • The value of identity in political movement
  • The potential for engaging local populations in meaningful change
  • The passion for stakeholder values

We are also interested in:

  • The key concepts, methods and applications in participatory action for cutting-edge sustainability
  • The use of ICT for smart community and participation from local to global perspective
  • Examples of citizen engagement
  • The emergence of a new civics

Additionally, we want to hear about:

  • Action research with stakeholders
  • Blending political strategy with local needs
  • Advocacy for community sustainability

Prof. Simon Bell
Prof. Giuseppe Ioppolo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Governance
  • Public participation
  • role of stakeholders
  • sustainability
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Stakeholder Participation and Advocacy Coalitions for Making Sustainable Fiji Mineral Royalty Policy
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030797
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
The Fiji government perceived mining as a means to accelerate economic growth because of its potential to generate great wealth for the Fijian economy. However, the environmental and social impacts associated with mining is of great concern. Mining activities have caused immense environmental [...] Read more.
The Fiji government perceived mining as a means to accelerate economic growth because of its potential to generate great wealth for the Fijian economy. However, the environmental and social impacts associated with mining is of great concern. Mining activities have caused immense environmental degradations that affect livelihoods. One way to recompense these mining impacts is to provide a source of income to the landowners that can substitute the providence of natural resources that were damaged or completely taken away by mining activities. From the current revenue earned from mining, only land leases have been paid out to landowners and no royalty payments as yet, because there are no specific guidelines to determine the distributions. These have brought about the great need to determine the fair share of mineral royalties between the Fiji Government and the landowners in Fiji. This paper will therefore explicate the formation of coalitions based on similarities in policy beliefs, the various strategies undertaken to interact and network with each coalition in efforts to advocate core policy beliefs to obtain government’s attention for the formulation of Fiji’s Mineral Royalty Policy, based on the analytical lenses of Advocacy Coalition Framework and Issue Network Theory, at both the problem definition and agenda setting stages. Moreover, this paper also investigates the impacts of political instability in formulating Fiji’s first ever Mineral Royalty Policy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Model-Based Exploration of Co-Creation Efforts: The Case of Solar Photovoltaics (PV) in Skåne, Sweden
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3905; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113905
Received: 18 June 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 24 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
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Abstract
Co-creation in the societal sphere is becoming important in many parts of the world. However, empirical analysis of co-creation in local energy transitions has been understudied. This paper aims to contribute to the field of local energy transitions by integrating a model-based approach [...] Read more.
Co-creation in the societal sphere is becoming important in many parts of the world. However, empirical analysis of co-creation in local energy transitions has been understudied. This paper aims to contribute to the field of local energy transitions by integrating a model-based approach with the municipal co-creation efforts in a local energy transition setting. The study uses a mixed-methods approach, with both quantitative and qualitative methods underpinning the approach. A System Dynamics (SD) model is built to analyse the feedback loops created by the co-creation efforts of the municipalities in Skåne, Sweden to increase the uptake of household solar photovoltaics. Simultaneously, the model is conceptualized and built in coordination with the municipality actors, and qualitative validation provided by them. An iterative process is implemented, consisting of three steps: interaction with the municipality actors (MAs), developing the causal relationships between the model variables and model development. The suggestions and discussions with the MAs were very useful in understanding the social factors and processes which help in the diffusion of a technologically innovative product, such as solar PV. The MAs said that they found the explanation of the modelling variables useful in undertaking the co-creation efforts. Full article
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