Special Issue "Moving toward Sustainability: Rethinking Gender Structures in Education and Occupation Systems"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sandra L. Hanson
Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, Catholic University, Washington, DC 20064, USA
Interests: gender inequality in education and occupation systems; gender inequality in STEM; intersection of gender and race/ethnicity inequality; cross-national comparisons of inequalities; quantitative methods
Dr. Enrique S. Pumar
Website
Chief Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA
Interests: economic sociology; international migration; urban sociology; sociology of development; comparative historical sociology; Latino/Hispanic populations and societies

Special Issue Information

Sustainability requires ending discrimination based on gender and providing equal opportunities for education and employment. For this Special Issue we invite original research papers on the topic of “Moving Toward Sustainability: Rethinking Gender Structures in Education and Occupation Systems” from a wide range of perspectives, disciplines, methodologies, and countries. We encourage original research papers that examine the effects of gender structures but also provide initiatives to reverse gender inequalities and promote sustainability.

Dear Colleagues,

The open access journal Sustainability (ISSN2071-1050) is pleased to announce its plan to publish a Special Issue on “Moving toward Sustainability: Rethinking Gender Structures in Education and Occupation Systems.” Sustainability involves meeting our needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs. For sustainability to occur we need natural resources, but also human, social and economic capital. It involves programs, initiatives and actions aimed at the preservation of these resources and draws on politics, economics, philosophy and other social sciences and the hard sciences. This is the time for global action.

The United Nations has adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Building on the principle of “leaving no one behind”, the new Agenda emphasizes a holistic approach to achieving sustainable development for all. One of the main Sustainable Development Goals set out in the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda is to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.” Additionally, gender equality is a relevant factor in all 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals. Inclusive sustainable development can be realized only when all human rights – including gender equality – are protected, respected, and fulfilled.

There is considerable evidence that gender equality has not been fully achieved in education and occupation systems in the U.S. or elsewhere. Gender inequality often intersects with other inequalities involving, for example, race/ethnicity, age, social class, and religion. These inequalities are problematic in that gender equality is critical for achieving the principle of inclusion in sustainability. A movement toward equality in education and occupation systems will advance sustainable development on a wide scope including promoting economic growth, reducing poverty, moving toward food security and resilience to disasters as well as creating communities that are more peaceful and inclusive.

Although there is gender inequality across areas of education and occupations, some of the greatest inequality is in the STEM fields. Considering how applied sciences promise to resolve some of our more pressing development issues today, gender equality in this field is vital to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Many women are held back from advancing in STEM by biases and norms that are built into educational and occupational structures. This is the case in spite of the considerable contributions that women scientists have made both historically and currently.

In sum, sustainability requires ending discrimination and exclusion based on gender and providing equal opportunities for education and employment. For this Special Issue we invite original research papers on the topic of “Moving Toward Sustainability: Rethinking Gender Structures in Education and Occupation Systems” from a wide range of perspectives, disciplines, methodologies, and countries. We encourage original research papers that examine the effects of gender structures but also provide initiatives to reverse gender inequalities and promote sustainability.

Dr. Sandra L. Hanson
Dr. Enrique S. Pumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website. Page limit: 30 pages (including the bibliography/references and any appendixes).

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • gender
  • education
  • occupations
  • structures
  • inequality

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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