Special Issue "Life Cycle Cost - A Tool for Development of Sustainable Products and Technologies"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Jaroslaw Selech
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Poznan University of Technology, Poznan, Poland
Interests: life cycle cost analysis; reliability analysis; maintenance; transport
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karol Andrzejczak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan, Poland
Interests: theory of reliability; stochastic models of maintenance; optimisation of transport costs; statistics in transport
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Stanisław Młynarski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cracow University of Technology, 31-155 Cracow, Poland
Interests: operation of machines and vehicles as well as reliability; safety and economy in transport
Dr. Katarzyna Joachimiak-Lechman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Poznan University of Economics and Business, 61-875 Poznan, Poland
Interests: life cycle assessment; life cycle cost; life cycle management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Life cycle costing (LCC) is often used to assess different technological processes in many manufacturing sectors, such as the automotive, railway, mining, energy, building construction, chemical, and consumer goods sectors. LCC is different from the traditional cost accounting system which reports cost object profitability on a calendar basis (i.e., monthly, quarterly and annually), whereas life cycle costs are the sum of all funds expended in support of the item from its conception and fabrication through its operation to the end of its useful life. Although many different methods of LCC are known, they are not widely implemented and little is known about how practising LCC improves life cycle management (LCM), especially if LCM is considered in three dimensions of sustainability, such as economy (LCC), environment (LCA), and social (SLCA).

Furthermore, the costs generated during the technology operation period can be significant, especially maintenance, repair and replacement costs, therefore they should be taken into consideration during the decision-making process, namely through a Life Cycle Cost Analysis. One key element of long-term maintenance is the identification and optimisation of the life cycle costs of investments as part of purchasing decision-making. The predictability of costs and the profitable use of technology can be enhanced by using the techno-economic LCC model, which can be used to predict life cycle costs as part of maintenance management and investment planning.

Original research, theoretical and experimental, case studies, and comprehensive review papers are invited for possible publication in this Special Issue. It will also consider computational techniques, probabilistic methods, and mathematical optimisation techniques that are expertly blended to support the analysis of multicriteria decision-making problems with defined requirements.

We invite submissions from the areas of engineering, natural sciences, public policy, law, social science, business and economics. Relevant topics to this Special Issue include, but are not limited to the following subjects:

  • Life-Cycle Costing (LCC) as an assessment tool used in industrial technology;
  • LCC analysis as an engineering economic analysis quantifying the differential costs of alternative investment options;
  • Stochastic processes in the life cycle cost prediction;
  • Remaining useful lifetime and maintenance costs of the operated technical facility;
  • Environmental and economic life cycle efficiency;
  • Sustainable production and consumption;
  • Prediction and optimisation of durability, reliability and operating costs;
  • RAMS analysis for transport systems;
  • Analysis of the warranty period in terms of safety, reliability and cost of use.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Jaroslaw Selech
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karol Andrzejczak
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Stanisław Młynarski
Dr. Katarzyna Joachimiak-Lechman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • life cycle cost (LCC)
  • life cycle assessment (LCA)
  • life cycle management (LCM)
  • efficiency
  • social life cycle assessment (SLCA)
  • life cycle cost management
  • sustainable products
  • sustainable technology
  • sustainable system
  • maintenance management
  • remaining useful lifetime (RUL)
  • stochastic models of maintenance
  • theory of reliability
  • statistics in transport
  • reliability
  • availability
  • maintainability
  • safety (RAMS)
  • warranty time
  • optimisation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Optimization of Safety System Structures in Railway Transport
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10700; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910700 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 548
Abstract
One of the basic strategies for reacting to unacceptable risk is introducing new elements to the analyzed domain. These elements and the relations between them can be treated as a safety system. Although expanding the safety system usually reduces the risk of specific [...] Read more.
One of the basic strategies for reacting to unacceptable risk is introducing new elements to the analyzed domain. These elements and the relations between them can be treated as a safety system. Although expanding the safety system usually reduces the risk of specific hazards, it often leads to new problems resulting from its excessive development: the system becomes costly and difficult to understand. One of the methods of avoiding the negative issues is to apply an approach described in this paper, which is based on an optimization method making use of the results of risk analysis. The article contains a detailed mathematical description of an optimal solution search algorithm, enabling the selection of a configuration of safety system components that will be the most appropriate in terms of the degree of risk reduction and the related costs. The theoretical part was supplemented with a working example concerning railway traffic control systems. Using the proposed method, it is possible to obtain an optimal structure of a safety system, ensuring at least a tolerated level of risk, adequate to the identified hazards. Full article
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Article
Digital Twin Aided Vulnerability Assessment and Risk-Based Maintenance Planning of Bridge Infrastructures Exposed to Extreme Conditions
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2051; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042051 - 14 Feb 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1224
Abstract
Over the past centuries, millions of bridge infrastructures have been constructed globally. Many of those bridges are ageing and exhibit significant potential risks. Frequent risk-based inspection and maintenance management of highway bridges is particularly essential for public safety. At present, most bridges rely [...] Read more.
Over the past centuries, millions of bridge infrastructures have been constructed globally. Many of those bridges are ageing and exhibit significant potential risks. Frequent risk-based inspection and maintenance management of highway bridges is particularly essential for public safety. At present, most bridges rely on manual inspection methods for management. The efficiency is extremely low, causing the risk of bridge deterioration and defects to increase day by day, reducing the load-bearing capacity of bridges, and restricting the normal and safe use of them. At present, the applications of digital twins in the construction industry have gained significant momentum and the industry has gradually entered the information age. In order to obtain and share relevant information, engineers and decision makers have adopted digital twins over the entire life cycle of a project, but their applications are still limited to data sharing and visualization. This study has further demonstrated the unprecedented applications of digital twins to sustainability and vulnerability assessments, which can enable the next generation risk-based inspection and maintenance framework. This study adopts the data obtained from a constructor of Zhongcheng Village Bridge in Zhejiang Province, China as a case study. The applications of digital twins to bridge model establishment, information collection and sharing, data processing, inspection and maintenance planning have been highlighted. Then, the integration of “digital twins (or Building Information Modelling, BIM) + bridge risk inspection model” has been established, which will become a more effective information platform for all stakeholders to mitigate risks and uncertainties of exposure to extreme weather conditions over the entire life cycle. Full article
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