Special Issue "Interpersonal Violence and Sustainable Development Goals"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Raul Navarro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Humanities,University of Castilla-La Mancha, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
Interests: interpersonal violence; bullying; cyberbullying; gender-based violence; LGTBI+ studies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Beatriz Víllora
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Humanities,University of Castilla-La Mancha, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
Interests: cyberdating abuse; romantic relationships dissolution; mental health; social work

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Interpersonal violence is defined as a behavior that is intended to harm another individual. It includes many acts and behaviors that range from physical, sexual, and psychological violence to deprivation and abandonment. Interpersonal violence comprises different types of manifestations, such as youth violence, intimate partner violence, sexual violence, mobbing, bullying, cyber violence, child maltreatment, and elder abuse, among others. The negative health outcomes of any type of interpersonal violence are well documented. Consequently, actions to address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of significantly reducing all forms of violence (SDG 16.1) and specifically eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls (SDG 5.2) have been developed across the globe during the last decade.

The present Special Issue aims to bring together projects and experiences developed in different countries to reduce interpersonal violence in its different forms and manifestations. We would also like to encourage submissions identifying relationships between interpersonal violence and SDGs, and research analyzing a wide range of risk and protective factors that should be taken into account to prevent and reduce all forms of violence. In this sense, the Special Issue will try to answer the question: how can violence elimination become a reality to achieve the SDGs?

To answer this question, all kinds of papers are welcome: conceptual, narrative reviews, systematic reviews, intervention evaluations, qualitative and quantitative studies, and experimental research. Although we encourage submissions on all manifestations of interpersonal violence, research analyzing different forms of gender-based violence is especially welcome.

Dr. Raul Navarro
Dr. Beatriz Víllora
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interpersonal violence
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • gender-based violence
  • child maltreatment
  • elder abuse
  • intimate partner violence
  • bullying
  • cyberbullying
  • mobbing
  • sexual violence

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Systematic Literature Review of Sexual Harassment Studies with Text Mining
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6589; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126589 - 09 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 578
Abstract
Sexual harassment has been the topic of thousands of research articles in the 20th and 21st centuries. Several review papers have been developed to synthesize the literature about sexual harassment. While traditional literature review studies provide valuable insights, these studies have some limitations [...] Read more.
Sexual harassment has been the topic of thousands of research articles in the 20th and 21st centuries. Several review papers have been developed to synthesize the literature about sexual harassment. While traditional literature review studies provide valuable insights, these studies have some limitations including analyzing a limited number of papers, being time-consuming and labor-intensive, focusing on a few topics, and lacking temporal trend analysis. To address these limitations, this paper employs both computational and qualitative approaches to identify major research topics, explore temporal trends of sexual harassment topics over the past few decades, and point to future possible directions in sexual harassment studies. We collected 5320 research papers published between 1977 and 2020, identified and analyzed sexual harassment topics, and explored the temporal trend of topics. Our findings indicate that sexual harassment in the workplace was the most popular research theme, and sexual harassment was investigated in a wide range of spaces ranging from school to military settings. Our analysis shows that 62.5% of the topics having a significant trend had an increasing (hot) temporal trend that is expected to be studied more in the coming years. This study offers a bird’s eye view to better understand sexual harassment literature with text mining, qualitative, and temporal trend analysis methods. This research could be beneficial to researchers, educators, publishers, and policymakers by providing a broad overview of the sexual harassment field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interpersonal Violence and Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Barriers to Formal Help-Seeking Behavior by Battered Turkish Women According to Sociodemographic Factors
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010165 - 26 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1227
Abstract
Violence against women is a significant sociological problem that negatively affects society. Although violence against women is widespread worldwide, the help-seeking behavior of women exposed to violence remains underdeveloped. In this study conducted in Turkey, the formal help-seeking behavior of women exposed to [...] Read more.
Violence against women is a significant sociological problem that negatively affects society. Although violence against women is widespread worldwide, the help-seeking behavior of women exposed to violence remains underdeveloped. In this study conducted in Turkey, the formal help-seeking behavior of women exposed to violence was studied according to sociodemographic factors. Data were obtained from surveys on domestic violence against women from the Turkish Statistical Institute (TURKSTAT), which was held in 2008 and 2014. Chi-square and binary logistic regression analyses are used in this study. The dependent variable is determined as whether women who had experienced violence sought help from formal institutions. In order to explain the dependent variable, education, age group, region, and sociodemographic variables are used. According to the results, as the education level of women exposed to violence increases, help-seeking behavior through official means also increases. In addition, women with a personal income are more likely to seek formal help than those without, and the development of the sociocultural region inhabited affects the formal help-seeking behavior of women exposed to violence. Between 2008 and 2014, legal regulations on women’s rights in Turkey were seen to positively affect formal help-seeking behavior. Although the formal help-seeking behavior of women subjected to violence in 2014 increased significantly compared to 2008, this improvement is not sufficient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interpersonal Violence and Sustainable Development Goals)
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