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Special Issue "Frontiers in Soil Management and Environment Sustainability in Sustainable Agriculture and Forestry"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 1490

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Taimoor Hassan Farooq
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bangor College China, A Joint Unit of Bangor University and Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004, China
Interests: restoration ecology; plant soil interaction; nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems; nutrient deficiency and stress; carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition; GHG emissions; root and canopy development; soil conservation and biogeochemistry, environmental chemistry; carbon sequestration; soil microbial community composition; integrated cropping system; agroforestry and intercropping
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Muhammad Saleem Arif
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Government College University Faisalabad (GCUF), Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
Interests: soil health and ecosystem functions; nutrient cycling’ plant-soil-microbe interaction; ecological intensfication in agroecosystems
Dr. Muhammad Haroon U. Rashid
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forestry and Range Management, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Faisalabad 38000, Pakistan
Interests: forest cultivation; agroforestry; root development; plant and Soil interaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Managing soil properties includes protecting the soil structure necessary for agricultural and forest production and applying agricultural, silvicultural, and processing techniques to increase the long-term efficiency of the soil. Sustainable farming reduces pollution by using natural fertilizers and using fewer chemicals. This means that farm produce is healthier and better for people. Even the waste produced by sustainable farming goes back into the farm's ecosystem and does not pollute the environment. Soil and environment management is important, both directly and indirectly, to crop productivity, environmental sustainability, and human health.

Using cover crops, applying manure and compost, rotating crops, and controlling erosion for soil conservation, can maintain or increase soil organic matter. Other practices, especially plowing, tilling and cultivating, can decrease the amount of organic matter in the soil. Sustainable production deals with keeping the soil alive with organic matter, integrated pest management and reduction in usage of pesticides, protecting biodiversity, ensuring food safety and food quality, improving nutrient quality, and fertilizing the soil with organic fertilizers.

Healthy, fully functioning soil provides an environment that sustains and nourishes plants, soil microbes, and beneficial insects. Crops grown in healthy soil are more resilient because they resist pest pressure and use nutrients more efficiently. Therefore, research will be required to avoid further degradation of soils and environments through erosion or contamination and to produce sufficient safe and nutritious food for healthy diets.

This Special Issue aims to enlarge the present knowledge related to soil management and environmental sustainability in sustainable agriculture and forestry. Innovative research on technologies and methodological approaches are welcomed. The discussion of case studies, as well as of experimental work is encouraged.

Dr. Taimoor Hassan Farooq
Dr. Muhammad Saleem Arif
Dr. Muhammad Haroon U. Rashid
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant and soil interaction
  • nutrient transformation
  • nutrient cycling
  • soil health management
  • soil nutrition and fertility
  • environmental protection
  • environmental conservation
  • pollutants
  • microorganism and microplastics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Characterizing the Morphological Descriptors of Thirty Seed Sources of Teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) Concerning Sustainable Forestry
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12012; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912012 - 22 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) plantations have increased recently in India; however, morphological descriptors for teak are still lacking. Thus, the goal of this work was to develop descriptors based on morphological characteristics. Among 30 seed sources collected from different states of India, [...] Read more.
Teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) plantations have increased recently in India; however, morphological descriptors for teak are still lacking. Thus, the goal of this work was to develop descriptors based on morphological characteristics. Among 30 seed sources collected from different states of India, 24 morphological descriptors, including leaf length, leaf width, presence of petiole, petiole length, leaf shape, shape of leaf apex, shape of leaf base, leaf texture, phyllotaxy, leaf attitude, leaf margin, leaf margin undulation, leaf brightness, leaf venation, leaf main vein, leaf veins, leaf vein color, leaf color, leaf pubescence, young leaf color, number of internodes, internodal length, trunk spots, and trunk color, were developed based on leaf and stem characteristics. These seed sources exhibited a difference in all traits except leaf shape, shape of leaf apex, leaf phyllotaxy, leaf margin, leaf venation, leaf main vein, and presence of trunk spots. The Jaccard similarity index was used to calculate the genetic similarity between the sources, and the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) method was used to perform a cluster analysis (four groups at a similarity of 0.5 were obtained). According to the observations made, most of the sources exhibited high similarity, which indicates that only a few characteristics can be used to distinguish the sources. Full article
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Article
The Role of Digital Soil Information in Assisting Precision Soil Management
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11710; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811710 - 18 Sep 2022
Viewed by 348
Abstract
Soil information is the basis for the site-specific management of soils. The study aimed to digitize soil information and classify it into soil mapping units (SMUs) using geostatistics. The study area was grouped into 12 SMUs, or management zones. The pH of the [...] Read more.
Soil information is the basis for the site-specific management of soils. The study aimed to digitize soil information and classify it into soil mapping units (SMUs) using geostatistics. The study area was grouped into 12 SMUs, or management zones. The pH of the soils ranged from 7.3 in SMU2 to 8.6 in SMU5. Most SMUs exhibited low total nitrogen (TN) that could be attributed to very low soil organic carbon (SOC) in the soils. Available phosphorus (AvP) was very low in all the mapping units. The exchangeable K varied between 0.12 cmol(+) kg−1 (SMU7) and 0.95 cmol(+) kg−1 (SMU10). SMU12 was identified as marginally sodic and at a high risk of developing severe alkalinity unless possible management measures are implemented. Our findings show that a lack of soil information causes an imbalance between soil requirements and external nutrient inputs, negatively affecting crop production. Therefore, high-resolution digital soil information can assist the site-specific application of soil nutrients and amendments based on spatial variability in line with soil requirements. Full article
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