Topical Collection "Sustainability in Financial Industry"

Editor

Dr. Helen Chiappini

Collection Editor
Department of Management and Business Administration, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Viale Pindaro 42, 65127 Pescara, Italy
Interests: social impact investment funds; banking sustainability; microfinance; intellectual capital; non-performing loans; governance of financial institutions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Topical Collection focuses on sustainability practices in financial industry. We encourage the submission of empirical and theoretical contributions investigating innovative business models and financial instruments for a sustainable finance, also in the light of the new regulatory frameworks on sustainability. Moreover, the Topical Collection welcomes research papers separately or jointly exploring the environmental, social, and financial performance of both financial institutions and markets.

All submitted papers will be peer-reviewed and selected on the basis of both their quality and their relevance to the theme of this Topical Collection. Themes of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Innovative business models for sustainable finance;
  • Innovative financial instruments and architectures for sustainability;
  • Financial performance of sustainable instruments, institutions, and markets;
  • Financial industry accountability practices in the field of sustainability;
  • Impact of new sustainability regulations on financial markets and institutions.

Dr. Helen Chiappini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable finance
  • Impact investing
  • Socially responsible investments
  • Business models for sustainable finance
  • Cross sector partnership for sustainability
  • Green bonds
  • Social, environmental, and development impact bonds
  • Microcredit
  • Social and environmental impact investment funds
  • Green regulation
  • CSR of financial institutions
  • Social and environmental impact measurement
  • Accountability of ESG performance
  • Social and environmental rating
  • Climate risk
  • Intellectual Capital Disclosure
  • Corporate Governance
  • Non financial disclosure

Published Papers (3 papers)

2020

Jump to: 2019

Open AccessArticle
Rethinking the Income Inequality and Financial Development Nexus. A Study of Nine OECD Countries
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5449; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135449 - 06 Jul 2020
Abstract
Sustainable finance seeks to increase the contribution of finance to sustainable and inclusive growth. The global financial crisis of 2008 provoked the return of inequality in advanced countries to levels typical of a century ago. The aim of this paper is to empirically [...] Read more.
Sustainable finance seeks to increase the contribution of finance to sustainable and inclusive growth. The global financial crisis of 2008 provoked the return of inequality in advanced countries to levels typical of a century ago. The aim of this paper is to empirically analyze the relationship between finance and income inequality for a group of nine OECD countries over the pre-crisis and post-crisis periods (2000–2015). The model proposed in this study simultaneously considers two explanatory variables for measuring financial depth (credit provision and capital markets) and a new multidimensional variable to measure the financial system’s resilience (a composite indicator), and conducts panel data analysis. The empirical results confirm that in terms of financial depth, the "too much finance hypothesis" holds. We also find that financial system’s resilience helps alleviate existing income inequality and that income inequality appears higher in liberal market economies than in coordinated economies. These results encourage policymakers to look beyond traditional public redistribution interventions and to pay attention to other financial variables related to the financialization process, the behavior of financial intermediaries, and the specific environment in which they operate. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Factors Affecting Farmers’ Access to Formal and Informal Credit: Evidence from Rural Afghanistan
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031268 - 10 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Adequate access to credit is necessary for the sustainable development of agriculture. This study uses a double hurdle model to investigate what affects farming households’ credit participation and amount, and a Probit model to find out credit constraints. For this purpose, the data [...] Read more.
Adequate access to credit is necessary for the sustainable development of agriculture. This study uses a double hurdle model to investigate what affects farming households’ credit participation and amount, and a Probit model to find out credit constraints. For this purpose, the data from a survey of 292 farming households in Afghanistan was utilized. The study finds that households obtain credit for their agricultural activities from various formal and informal sources. The results of the double hurdle model reveal that the financial activities of the households were positively determined by crop diversity, education, number of adults in a household, size of land, and access to extension. Non-agricultural income decreases the likelihood of participation. The results of the analysis of credit constraints indicate that formal credit did not help small-scale and remoter farming households; however, these households relied on informal credit, especially when they faced income shock. Furthermore, religious belief increased the chances of avoiding formal credit but not informal credit. It is suggested that formal credit should be expanded to rural areas, especially to small-scale farming households. Policy makers should also consider increasing access to extension. Formal financial institutions should provide Sharia-compliant credit, which increases the confidence level of households in using formal credit in Afghanistan. Full article

2019

Jump to: 2020

Open AccessArticle
Impact Investing Strategy: Managing Conflicts between Impact Investor and Investee Social Enterprise
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4117; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154117 - 30 Jul 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Impact investing pursues the dual goals of creating socio-economic value for the marginalized, and ensuring net positive financial returns. Impact investing firms achieve their goals through their investments in projects and enterprises which create both social and commercial values. The primary aim of [...] Read more.
Impact investing pursues the dual goals of creating socio-economic value for the marginalized, and ensuring net positive financial returns. Impact investing firms achieve their goals through their investments in projects and enterprises which create both social and commercial values. The primary aim of this article is to contribute to our understanding of the process of impact investing, particularly with respect to issues related to aligning impact investing and investee social enterprise goals. The research method employs case-based research methodology. The data consist of six cases of impact investing and their investee social enterprises. In addition, the data involve interviews with experts from the field of impact investing. The findings are that: (1) Social mission plays an important moderating role in the inter-organizational relationship between the impact investor and the investee social enterprise, (2) and an emphasis on due diligence, sector specialization, and communication increases the likelihood of investment while (3) social impact measurement and reporting and frequent engagement increase the likelihood of post-investment alignment. The key contribution of this article is that impact investing (unlike venture capital) is influenced by the ability of its investee to create social value, which plays an important role in the inter-organizational relationship between investor and investee. Furthermore, similar to industry specialization in the for-profit investing, social sector specialization is equally relevant for alignment and returns. Full article
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