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New Insights into Resilient Cities under New Urban Crises

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 November 2023) | Viewed by 2834

Special Issue Editors

Department of Urban Planning and Design, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR; School of Public Administration, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
Interests: environmental inequality; urban resilience; mobility; urban morphology; urban informatics
Department of Urban Planning, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116, China
Interests: urban environment and public health; application of GIS and big data
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Public Administration, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: land use change; spatial optimization; urban modeling; big data application
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. School of Architecture and Art, Central South University, Changsha 410082, China
2. Department of Urban Planning and Design, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: urban vitality; urban heat island; air quality; the application of the geographical open data in urban and environmental studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are all aware that we are living in an urbanizing and rapidly changing world, where massive disruptive, extreme urban crises and shocks have become increasingly commonplace. Abrupt events and changes occurring in recent years, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, global climate change, financial and energy crisis, and social protests, are different from meanwhile much more diverse, frequent, and intensified than their counterparts in the past few decades. In face of these unexpected events and natural and man-made disasters (e.g., heavy floods, heat waves, and pollution), local institutions and urban planners seek to undertake many countermeasures to save lives and reduce economic losses and identify the key fundamental characteristics and elements of cities and societies that help themselves get back on track and even flourish afterward. On the other hand, the development of new-generation information technologies, especially big data and smart devices, offers powerful tools that enable us to capture, monitor, and understand the near real-time dynamics of cities and human behavioral changes and to facilitate policy-making so as to ensure that urban systems and dwellers are prepared for crisis events.

Hence, there is a pressing need to delve into the adaptation and resilience of individuals, communities, societies, and city systems in response to the wide-ranging and long-standing impacts of these new urban crises that may be occurring now and in the near future. In particular, more efforts are needed to rethink and fully address the fundamental questions of “what is urban resilience and how to measure it in different dimensions and across spatial and temporal scales?” and “how can these conceptualizations and measurements inform adaptation strategies for urban planning and design?” The answers could benefit the development of planning theories, methodologies, and practices for building resilient cities.

We are seeking original reviews and research papers to enrich the scope of resilient cities, to measure urban resilience with novel approaches or data, and to inform urban planning and design from new perspectives. This Special Issue is open to call for papers covering but not limited to the following topics:

  1. New concepts, perspectives, or theoretical discussions of resilient cities under the context of new urban crises (e.g., pandemics, climate extremes, and financial and energy crisis);
  2. New measurements of urban resilience from different dimensions (e.g., social, economic, and environmental) using new methods or big data (e.g., human mobility and social media data);
  3. Examination of the spatial and temporal patterns of urban residence within urban areas across scales;
  4. Unequal vulnerability and resilience of socioeconomic population groups in unexpected events and disasters;
  5. Challenges and opportunities for developing the alleviation and adaptation strategies to inform urban planning and design.

Dr. Chang Xia
Dr. Huagui Guo
Dr. Qingsong He
Dr. Anqi Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resilience
  • urban planning
  • unexpected events
  • disasters
  • vulnerability
  • big data

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 6557 KiB  
Article
Exposure to Wind as a Threat to the Sustainable Development of Small Towns in the Zhambyl Region (Kazakhstan)
by Kulyash Kaimuldinova, Duman Aliaskarov, Shakhislam Laiskhanov, Jan A. Wendt and Karlygash Muzdybayeva
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052144 - 5 Mar 2024
Viewed by 926
Abstract
Currently, global urbanization trends offer various development models, but their main goal is to create a comfortable and safe environment for city residents. Most cities in Kazakhstan are small in scale and face several pressing problems, such as limited infrastructure, inadequate public services, [...] Read more.
Currently, global urbanization trends offer various development models, but their main goal is to create a comfortable and safe environment for city residents. Most cities in Kazakhstan are small in scale and face several pressing problems, such as limited infrastructure, inadequate public services, economic challenges resulting in unemployment, environmental problems, and housing shortages. In this article, using the examples of the towns of Zhanatas and Karatau, an attempt was made to indicate the threat posed by wind to the sustainable development of monocities in the Zhambyl region. The working hypothesis of our study is that state policy supporting the sustainable development of small towns is insufficient and should be changed. Theoretical, empirical, and cartographic methods were used during the research, depending on the specificity of the analyzed territories. The unique climatic features of the cities of Karatau and Zhanatas, which are located in the study area, were taken into account and unfavorable meteorological phenomena were analyzed. The collected data were used to assess the impact of climatic conditions on the sustainable development of small towns in the study area. The research’s results allow one not only to determine the impact of wind exposure on the sustainable development of small towns in the Zhambyl region, but also constitute a basis for assessing, more generally, the opportunities and threats relevant to small towns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Resilient Cities under New Urban Crises)
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Review

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18 pages, 1182 KiB  
Review
Urban in Question: Recovering the Concept of Urban in Urban Resilience
by Shomon Shamsuddin
Sustainability 2023, 15(22), 15907; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152215907 - 14 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1478
Abstract
Existential threats from climate change, weather-related disasters, and other crises have drawn increasing attention to urban resilience. Prior work has focused on explicating resilience and proposing various definitions of it. But the emphasis on describing resilience might overlook what urban means in discussions [...] Read more.
Existential threats from climate change, weather-related disasters, and other crises have drawn increasing attention to urban resilience. Prior work has focused on explicating resilience and proposing various definitions of it. But the emphasis on describing resilience might overlook what urban means in discussions of urban resilience. This paper investigates how urban resilience scholarship conceptualizes and defines the term urban. I conduct a literature review and content analysis of recently published urban resilience articles. The results reveal how urban is prominently featured, but its conceptual use is not identified, and the term is left undefined. The findings suggest serious concerns about the applicability and generalizability of urban resilience to different contexts. The paper contributes to the literature by showing how conceptualizing urban alternately as a shared subject of study, influential condition, or measurement category has far-reaching implications for urban resilience planning, implementation, and assessment. Drawing upon the idea of simulated annealing, the paper suggests that taking a few conceptual steps backward may help our understanding of urban resilience—and cities to bounce back better. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Resilient Cities under New Urban Crises)
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