Special Issue "Sustainability of Children’s Psychological Health"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ana M. Tur-Porcar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, Avda. Blasco Ibáñez 21, 46010 Valencia, Spain
Interests: Parenting, Prosocial behaviour, Aggressiveness, parent-child relationships, parent-child relationships, peer relationships, school environment, vulnerable environments, personal protective factors
Dr. Alicia Mas-Tur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Valencia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vulnerable children are exposed to personal, family-related, educational, and social difficulties that aggravate their risk situations. This scenario may remain unchanged until adult life, and even transfer to their descendants. In this regard, education has been proven fundamental because accessing the labor market with basic qualifications allows individuals to overcome the risk situations (1). Therefore, designing procedures and programs that address family, personal, educational, and social environments may help put a stop to permanent vulnerability situations.

Regarding the family dimension, parent-child relationships and raising styles determine the quality of the interactions, which are highly linked to children’s development (2). In this regard, warm relationships, based on support and communication, give way to inductive discipline, which facilitates a balanced development of the child. Conversely, cold relationships, based on psychological control, negative feedback, lack of trust, and aggressiveness, affect children’s development negatively (3).

As per the educational or school dimension, the aim of education planning is the students’ comprehensive training. However, these programs are focused on the contents of formal subjects such as Math, languages, or natural sciences. Socio-emotional training programs usually incorporate the contents of formal subjects into socio-emotional learning, which influences students positively.

In the social dimension, the individual’s development is also obstructed by his or her environment and social atmosphere. This dimension encompasses the mesosystem and the macro-system, that is, the neighborhood, the parents’ job environment, friendships, the access to supplementary educational services, the mass media, social organization, or culture (6, 7).

The social dimension includes the school; academic training offers opportunities for a better life and is paramount for the development of human capital, which is required to fight against poverty (8). Low social strata are related to accessing low-qualification jobs and unhealthy lifestyles such as a poor diet, restricted access to supplementary services, and more probabilities of suffering illnesses related to sight or hearing (9). Furthermore, adolescents belonging to low socioeconomic status (SES) are more prone to associating with rebel peers (10), to consuming alcohol and marihuana at a younger age (11), and to having defying behavior (12) than their counterparts from higher strata are.

This Special Issue seeks research focusing on innovation and educational sustainability, aiming at solving personal vulnerability situations through assessment, programs, or interventions that show the effects in the population. This issue welcomes original, high-quality research based on theoretical, methodological, and empirical research, case studies, and implementation experiences. Accepted topics include:

  • Socio-emotional intervention programs at school aiming at solving vulnerability situations.
  • Vulnerability and educational innovation.
  • Training families on innovation and development to revitalize parent-child relationships regarding social adaptation.
  • Effects of socio-emotional education in the development of children and adolescents.
  • Sustainability and educational innovation.

Submission instructions:

The Editors want to confer this special number a significant value as regards innovation and educational sustainability. Complete manuscripts must be submitted via email to Ana M. Tur Porcar (Universidad de Valencia; [email protected]) and Alicia Mas Tur (Universidad de Valencia; [email protected]). The papers must not be submitted directly to the Journal. Cover page must include title, name of author(s), and contact details of the corresponding author.

The papers must be original and not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Selected papers for publication will go through a double-blind peer review, following the review procedure of the journal. Final acceptance will be based on relevance of the topic, technical quality, degree of content innovativeness, and originality of the approaches as well as the research results.

All manuscripts sent must be compatible with the journal’s general guidelines.

  1. Salvioni, D. M.; Franzoni, S.; Cassano, R. Sustainability in the Higher Education System: An Opportunity to Improve Quality and Image. Sustainability 2017, 9, 914.
  2. Ferreira, T., Cadima, J., Matias, M., Vieira, J. M., Leal, T., & Matos, P. M.. Preschool Children’s Prosocial Behavior: The Role of Mother–Child, Father–Child and Teacher–Child Relationships. J. Child Fam. Stud. 2016, 25(6), 1829-1839. DOI: 10.1007/s10826-016-0369-x.
  3. Slagt, M., Semon Dubas, J., y Aken, M. A. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting in Middle Childhood: Do Impulsivity, Effortful Control and Negative Emotionality Indicate Susceptibility or Vulnerability? Infant and Child Development 2015, 25(4), 302-324. DOI: 10.1002/icd.1929
  4. Jones, S.M.; Brown; J.L.; Aber, J.L. Two-year impacts of a universal school-based social-emotional and literacy intervention: An experiment in translational developmental research. Child. Dev. 2011, 82, 533–554, doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01560.x.
  5. Tur-Porcar, A., Mas-Tur, A., & Malonda Vidal, E. Long-Term Educational Sustainability: Educational Innovation in Social Vulnerability Contexts. Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1626. doi:10.3390/su9091626
  6. Bronfenbrenner, U. Ecology of the family as a context for human development: research perspectives. Developmental Psychology 1986, 22(6), 723-742.
  7. Bronfenbrenner, U., & Morris, P. A. The bioecological model of human development. In R. M. Lerner & W. Damon (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology 2006 (6th ed., pp. 793-828). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley
  8. Battle, J., & Lewis, M. The increasing significance of class: The relative effects of race and socioeconomic status on academic achievement. Journal of Poverty 2002, 6(2), 21-35.
  9. Koster, A.; Bosma, H.; van Lenthe, F.J.; Kempen, G.I.; Mackenbach, J.P.; van Eijk, J.T. The role of psychosocial factors in explaining socio-economic differences in mobility decline in a chronically ill population: Results from the GLOBE study. Soc. Sci. Med. 2005, 61, 123–132.
  10. Moss, H.B.; Lynch, K.G.; Hardie, T.L. Affiliation with deviant peers among children of substance dependent fathers from pre-adolescence into adolescence: Associations with problem behaviors. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2003, 71, 117–125, doi:10.1016/S0376-8716(03)00073-5.
  11. Fothergill, K.E.; Ensminger, M.E. Childhood and adolescent antecedents of drug and alcohol problems: A longitudinal study. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006, 82, 61–76.
  12. Rieh, S.Y.; Lee, B.Y.; Oh, J.G.; Schuetze, T.; Porras Álvarez, S.; Lee, K.; Park, J. Integration of Sustainability into Architectural Education at Accredited Korean Universities. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1121.

Prof. Dr. Ana M. Tur-Porcar
Dr. Alicia Mas-Tur
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sexism and Aggression in Adolescence—How Do They Relate to Perceived Academic Achievement?
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3017; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093017 - 24 Aug 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
Sexist attitudes are rooted in patriarchal structures, which uphold traditional gender stereotypes, and which are still found in society today. Scholars have found gender differences in perceived academic achievement, with girls performing better than boys, and negative relationships between sexism and perceived academic [...] Read more.
Sexist attitudes are rooted in patriarchal structures, which uphold traditional gender stereotypes, and which are still found in society today. Scholars have found gender differences in perceived academic achievement, with girls performing better than boys, and negative relationships between sexism and perceived academic achievement. Moreover, perceived academic achievement and sexist attitudes have been associated with aggression and different kinds of violence. This study examined the associations between sexist attitudes and perceived academic achievement (using self-report data). The study also assessed the mediating role of physical and verbal aggression in the relationship between sexist attitudes and perceived academic achievement. Seven hundred eight Spanish adolescents participated in the study. The mean age was 13.00 (SD = 0.95; range = 12–14 years). Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the effects among variables for boys and girls. Results showed the role of benevolent sexism and hostile sexism in perceived academic achievement, as well as the mediating role of aggression in the relationship between sexism and perceived academic achievement. Findings and implications are discussed to assess measures for establishing intervention programs and educating adolescents in a non-sexist manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Children’s Psychological Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Family Socialisation Styles and Hostility in the Adolescent Population
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 2962; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10092962 - 21 Aug 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2008
Abstract
The affective involvement of parents in the socialization of their children is fundamental for the proper psychological and emotional adjustment of adolescents, although we know that it is difficult to study. In this research, the relationship between parenting style and hostility was analysed [...] Read more.
The affective involvement of parents in the socialization of their children is fundamental for the proper psychological and emotional adjustment of adolescents, although we know that it is difficult to study. In this research, the relationship between parenting style and hostility was analysed in Spanish adolescents. Five-hundred and thirty-six adolescents participated in this study (53.7% males and 46.3% females), between the ages of 12 and 18 (M = 15.76, SD = 1.43), enrolled in 4 compulsory Secondary Education centers of the Castellon province. Family socialization was evaluated through the parental styles: authoritative, indulgent, authoritarian and negligent, and hostility, through the Cook–Medley Hostility Scale Criteria assessment. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was carried out with multiple regression analysis. The results showed that hostility and compound hostility are higher in adolescents from authoritarian and authoritative families than in adolescents from indulgent families. It was also observed that the Mother’s Strictness/Imposition had the greatest effect on hostility, as well as a low acceptance/involvement of the father. Regarding parental styles, it was observed that mother’s deprivation, physical coercion, and mother’s verbal coercion were the greatest predictors of hostility. No differences were observed depending on the gender. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Children’s Psychological Health)
Open AccessArticle
Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Relation to the Stages of Changes and Achievement Goals in Adolescents: Comparative Study of Students in Spain, Costa Rica, and Mexico
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2581; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072581 - 23 Jul 2018
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between levels of leisure-time sports and physical activity and the stages of change in high school students with goal orientations. Methods: The sample was conformed of 2168 students randomly selected to participate in [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between levels of leisure-time sports and physical activity and the stages of change in high school students with goal orientations. Methods: The sample was conformed of 2168 students randomly selected to participate in a longitudinal study in Costa Rica (423), Mexico (408), and Spain (1337), with 1052 being boys, 1037 girls, and 79 who did not specify sex, aged between 11 and 16 years old (M = 12.49, SD = 0.81). We used a questionnaire to ask students about their leisure-time sports and physical activity, about stages of change and to measure achievement goals. Results: The results show that students are more active in Costa Rica, most of them being in a stage of active change. Conclusions: We found significant differences in achievement goals in all three countries, which shows that students in active stages have higher values than those in the inactive stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Children’s Psychological Health)
Open AccessArticle
Impact of the Interactive Learning Environments in Children’s Prosocial Behavior
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2138; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072138 - 22 Jun 2018
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 3494
Abstract
Prosocial behavior consists of a set of behaviors that are beneficial to others in the form of sharing and helping. It includes aspects such as solidarity and friendship, and it fosters development and positive psychological functioning; it also improves classroom and school climate. [...] Read more.
Prosocial behavior consists of a set of behaviors that are beneficial to others in the form of sharing and helping. It includes aspects such as solidarity and friendship, and it fosters development and positive psychological functioning; it also improves classroom and school climate. Interactive learning environments may play a crucial role in creating affordances for students to develop prosocial behavior. This study analyzes the impact of two educational interventions based on egalitarian dialogue (Dialogic Literary Gathering and Interactive Groups) on prosocial behavior among fourth grade elementary students. A quasi-experimental design has been carried out, in which measurements have been taken before and after the intervention. Results show that students involved in the Dialogic Literary Gatherings increased significantly their level of prosocial behavior more than those in the control groups. However, no significant differences have been found between students in the experimental and control condition, when considering Interactive Groups. These results have important educational implications for creating conducive learning environments for the development of prosocial behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability of Children’s Psychological Health)
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