Special Issue "Agroecology in Sustainable Agriculture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Philippe Baret
Website
Guest Editor
Earth and Life Institute, Faculté des bioingénieurs, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
Interests: agroecology; biodiversity; sustainable agriculture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past decade, agroecology has moved from being an alternative and minority proposition to a recognized and central concept in agricultural transition. This change has been driven by the growing interest in climate change and biodiversity issues. If agroecology is much more present in scientific literature and public policies, it is also more diffuse: the explicit and implicit definitions of agroecology are very variable and sometimes contradictory. Some uses of the concept of agroecology can be considered greenwashing while other propositions of definition are very radical.

The success of agroecology as a technical approach to agriculture is undeniable and promising for the development of more sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, there are still some key questions that are weakly addressed: how to define the socio-economic conditions of agroecology? What is the potential of agroecology for maintaining employment in rural areas? How agroecology can respond to rural-urban division: is urban agroecology connected to rural agroecology? What are the possible trajectories for a transition towards a generalization of agroecological models? How to articulate the concept of agroecology at different scales of the food system? Is agroecology compatible with an inclusive vision of agriculture? How to bridge the gap between agroecological principles and practices at the farm and food system levels? How does the development of organic farming contribute to the upscaling of agroecology?

Prof. Philippe Baret
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agroecology
  • rural–urban divide
  • foresight studies
  • food systems
  • working conditions in agriculture
  • greenwashing
  • rural development
  • agroecological principles
  • organic farming

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Correlation between Soil Nutrient and Potato Quality in Loess Plateau of China Based on PLSR
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1588; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041588 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
Potato tuber quality is influenced by the interaction of soil nutrients. Hence, simple correlation analysis cannot accurately reflect the true relationship between soil nutrients and potato tuber quality. In this study, potato tuber quality and soil nutrient content were used as research materials [...] Read more.
Potato tuber quality is influenced by the interaction of soil nutrients. Hence, simple correlation analysis cannot accurately reflect the true relationship between soil nutrients and potato tuber quality. In this study, potato tuber quality and soil nutrient content were used as research materials in the Loess Plateau of China. The partial least square regression (PLSR) method was used to establish the regression equation between potato quality and soil nutrient. The major soil nutrient indexes influencing potato quality were screened out to provide theoretical basis for potato field management. The results showed that the major soil nutrient factors influencing the potato tuber quality in Loess Plateau were soil ammonium nitrogen, soil nitrate nitrogen, soil available phosphorus, pH, and soil available potassium. Soil pH value is the most important factor affecting potato starch, reducing sugar content, and soluble protein content. Soil nitrate nitrogen is one of the important factors affecting potato tuber soluble total sugar content, vitamin C, browning intensity, and polyphenol oxidase activity. Soil ammonium nitrogen was positively correlated with the total soluble sugar content of potato tubers, and negatively correlated with reducing sugar content, browning intensity, and polyphenol oxidase activity. However, soil available potassium has positive effects on potato starch and reducing sugar content, and negative effects on soluble protein and browning strength. Results of this study indicates that the major soil nutrient factors influencing potato tuber quality were soil nitrate nitrogen and soil pH value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agroecology in Sustainable Agriculture)
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Open AccessArticle
Towards Sustainable Agriculture—Agronomic and Economic Effects of Biostimulant Use in Common Bean Cultivation
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4575; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174575 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Today, one of the greatest challenges faced by the agriculture industry is the development of sustainable and environmentally-friendly systems to meet nutritional demands of the continuously growing global population. A number of research studies have recently been undertaken with the aim to indicate [...] Read more.
Today, one of the greatest challenges faced by the agriculture industry is the development of sustainable and environmentally-friendly systems to meet nutritional demands of the continuously growing global population. A number of research studies have recently been undertaken with the aim to indicate types of parameters used in plant production that would be able to improve plant growth as well as the effectiveness and quality of yield, and to help plants cope with environmental stress. The aim of this study was to verify a hypothesis that the implementation of a sustainable agricultural technology, based on the use of synthetic biostimulants, will allow not only increasing crop yield and quality but also improving the cost-effectiveness of common bean cultivation. The field experiment was conducted in three growing seasons (2016–2018). In the growing season, the plants were treated with Atonik and Tytanit biostimulants in the form of single or double spraying. We determinated biometric traits, seed yield, seed number, and 1000-seed weight. Further analyses included contents of nutraceutical potential. The economic effect of using biostimulants was also calculated. The results of our experiment allowed verifying a hypothesis that the implementation of a sustainable agricultural technology based on the use of synthetic preparations was an effective method to increase plant productivity and, consequently, economic profits to farmers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agroecology in Sustainable Agriculture)
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