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Research on Strategic Human Resource Management and Organizational Performance

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2023) | Viewed by 8505

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute for Management Research, Radboud University, NL-6500 HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: HRM and performance; quality of working life; employee well-being

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2012, Jaap Paauwe, David Guest and Patrick Wright published their book HRM and Performance: Achievements and Challenges [1]. It contained an excellent overview of the state-of-the-art in the research field linking human resource management (HRM) to organizational performance, by an outstanding cast of internationally renowned authors. While there is consensus that HRM is important for ensuring employee well-being, high organizational performance and organizational survival, there is less consistency in empirical evidence for the proposed relationships between strategic HRM, the use of HR practices, employee outcomes and organizational performance indicators. Challenges in this research area center around theoretical ambiguity and empirical invalidity [1]. There are no universally agreed upon theories regarding HRM, performance and the linkage between them. Although the AMO (ability, motivation, opportunity) framework [2] has become the most accepted framework for studying HRM practices [3], there is no consensus about which HRM practices should be taken into account, or what particular outcomes to study. Accordingly, in empirical research, there is a large variety of measures and methods for determining the relationships between the use of HRM practices and performance indicators.

Moreover, while it is widely acknowledged that HRM practices do not work in isolation (i.e., the effects of HRM practices depend on other practices within the HRM system), there is a lack of clarity on the HRM systems construct [4]. As a result, there are still many questions regarding the way in which HRM practices need to be combined into systems (enabling synergies between HRM practices) in order to increase organizational performance. The frequently applied variance-based (i.e., regression-based) methods for determining the relationship between HRM and performance are not well-suited for addressing the configurational complexity of how various HR practices interact and affect organizational performance indicators [5].

Finally, most academic research in this area is being conducted in WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic) societies. However, there is growing consensus that theories developed in these societies do not apply in other parts of the world [6]. HR practices that work well to motivate employees or enable them to perform well in a WEIRD context may not work, or may work differently, in non-WEIRD contexts. Cultural and institutional differences affect the effects of HRM practices. As a result, there is a need for more empirical studies linking HRM and performance in non-WEIRD societies and comparing those results to the existing body of knowledge.

The aim of this Special Issue is to establish an updated overview of developments in the research area of linking HRM to organizational performance since the publication of the book by Paauwe, Guest and Wright [1]. For this, we invite scholarly contributions (original research articles and reviews) that address one or more of (but not limited to) the following themes:

  • Structured literature reviews or meta-analytic studies mapping (empirical) research in the past decade on linking strategic human resource management and organizational performance;
  • Empirical work focusing on sustainable HRM and/or including sustainability or corporate social responsibility as organizational performance indicators;
  • Empirical work focusing on the mediating and moderating factors explaining the relationship between HRM and performance;
  • Theoretical and/or empirical work on the systems element of HRM systems;
  • Empirical work that uses alternative (case-based) methods, such as NCA or (fs)QCA, enabling testing for synergy and equifinality;
  • Empirical studies or theoretical contributions on the link between HRM and performance in non-WEIRD contexts.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

References

  1. Paauwe, J.; Guest, D.E.; Wright, P.M.; Eds. HRM and Performance: Achievements and Challenges. John Wiley & Sons: Chichester, 2012.
  2. Appelbaum, E.; Bailey, T.; Berg, P.; Kalleberg, A.L. Manufacturing advantage: Why high-performance work systems pay off. Cornell University Press: Ithaca, 2000.
  3. Jiang, K.; Lepak, D.P.; Hu, J.; Baer, J.C. How does human resource management influence organizational outcomes? A meta-analytic investigation of mediating mechanisms. Academy of Management Journal 2012, 55, 1264-1294. doi: 10.5465/amj.2011.0088
  4. Boon, C.; Den Hartog, D.N.; Lepak, D.P. A systematic review of human resource management systems and their measurement. Journal of Management 2019, 45, 2498-2537. doi: 10.1177/0149206318818718
  5. Hauff, S.; Guerci, M.; Dul, J.; Van Rhee, H. Exploring necessary conditions in HRM research: Fundamental issues and methodological implications. Human Resource Management Journal 2021, 31, 18-36. doi: 10.1111/1748-8583.12231
  6. Henrich, J.; Heine, S.J.; Norenzayan, A. The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2010, 33, 61-83. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X0999152X

Dr. Roel Leonardus Joseph Schouteten
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • (strategic) human resource management
  • sustainable HRM
  • HRM practices
  • organizational performance
  • employee well-being
  • HRM systems
  • configurational approach
  • non-WEIRD contexts
  • structured literature reviews
  • quantitative methods
  • qualitative methods
  • case-based methods (NCA, fsQCA)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 522 KiB  
Article
The Sustainable Human Resource Practices and Employee Outcomes Link: An HR Process Lens
by Aline Elias, Karin Sanders and Jing Hu
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10124; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310124 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5756
Abstract
Sustainable human resource (HR) practices, such as diversity and inclusion, have gained considerable attention in HR research. However, to this point, most of the research has focused on the content of HR practices, rarely considering the HR process perspective. Consequently, the processes that [...] Read more.
Sustainable human resource (HR) practices, such as diversity and inclusion, have gained considerable attention in HR research. However, to this point, most of the research has focused on the content of HR practices, rarely considering the HR process perspective. Consequently, the processes that explain the relationships between sustainable HR practices and subsequent employee behavioural outcomes are unclear. In this conceptual paper, we propose a revised process model to explain the effects of sustainable HR practices by building on the Strategic HR process model. We contribute to the sustainable HR literature, the HR process research, and the process model by Wright and Nishii in particular. We conclude the conceptual paper by highlighting future research recommendations. Full article
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20 pages, 569 KiB  
Article
‘Lean Dancing’: How Involvement in Continuous Improvement and Lean Techniques Relate to Hospital Performance and Workers’ Wellbeing through Autonomy
by Robert van Kleeff, Jasmijn van Harten, Eva Knies and Paul Boselie
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 5546; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065546 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
This study examines Lean—conceptualized as Involvement in Continuous Improvement and Lean Techniques—in hospitals. Specifically, we aim to determine the extent to which hospital workers’ perceptions of Lean are related to perceptions of their performance and wellbeing, and to what extent these relationships are [...] Read more.
This study examines Lean—conceptualized as Involvement in Continuous Improvement and Lean Techniques—in hospitals. Specifically, we aim to determine the extent to which hospital workers’ perceptions of Lean are related to perceptions of their performance and wellbeing, and to what extent these relationships are explained by autonomy. Our data (n = 754) come from a Lean implementation study in a Dutch hospital, and are analysed using structural equation modelling. First, our results indicate that Involvement in Continuous Improvement positively relates to hospital workers’ perceptions of several dimensions of hospital performance (quality, service, efficiency, and predictability) and their own wellbeing (burnout and engagement)—a mutual benefit for both employer and employees. However, we also show that the Lean Techniques do not significantly relate to wellbeing. Second, our study reveals that it is essential to distinguish between responsible autonomy and choice autonomy, as we found differing mediating effects. Based on these findings, we recommend HR executives to move away from approaches that focus on happy few and to move away from approaches that focus on techniques. Full article
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