Special Issue "Strength and Conditioning Society: Applied Research for Sports Performance"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 4730

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pedro E. Alcaraz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCAM Research Center for High Performance Sport, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: strength training; power training; sprint training; soccer; football; basketball; training load; injury prevention
Dr. Irineu Loturco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, NAR, 04753-060 São Paulo-SP, Brazil
Interests: training programming; strength, speed, and power development in high-performance sports
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Tomás T. Freitas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCAM Research Center for High Performance Sport, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: strength and conditioning; performance assessment; sprint and change of direction, power training; strength training; team-sports, basketball, soccer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Strength and Conditioning Society (SCS), and in collaboration with the Nucleus of High Performance in Sport (NAR, Brazil), we are pleased to host this Special Issue in Sports (Basel), the SCS’ publishing partner.

Sports training is a complex and multifactorial process. Through the use of different strategies and methods, strength and conditioning professionals aim to maximize athletic performance and reduce the associated injury risk. Therefore, understanding the relationships between different physical capacities and performance metrics, as well as the acute and long-term effects of distinct training interventions on athletic populations is crucial for coaches and practitioners.

This Special Issue aims to disseminate evidence-based training approaches and publish studies related to applied strength and conditioning practices. We invite authors to submit investigations with male and female athletes from different sports, competitive levels, age categories, and training backgrounds. We are particularly interested in studies focused on day-to-day practices of strength, power, and speed development; aerobic and anaerobic conditioning; and injury risk mitigation. We recognize that conducting research in real-world settings is challenging and that the methodological approaches used in these situations may differ from those employed in laboratory setups. However, we firmly believe that the results from applied research are more likely to be implemented in high-performance sport settings. Original articles, reviews, case studies, short reports, and opinion pieces are welcomed.

Dr. Pedro E. Alcaraz
Dr. Irineu Loturco
Dr. Tomás T. Freitas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • strength and conditioning
  • athletic performance
  • strength training
  • power training
  • speed development
  • endurance training
  • concurrent training
  • performance assessment
  • injury risk mitigation
  • high-performance sports

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Variations in the Physical Performance of Olympic Boxers over a Four-Day National Qualifying Tournament
Sports 2021, 9(5), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9050062 - 12 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine changes in body mass (BM) and power-related measures in Olympic boxers during an official qualifying boxing tournament. Fourteen elite amateur boxers from the Brazilian National Team (eight men and six women) participated in this study. [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to examine changes in body mass (BM) and power-related measures in Olympic boxers during an official qualifying boxing tournament. Fourteen elite amateur boxers from the Brazilian National Team (eight men and six women) participated in this study. Athletes performed three fights in four days against the same opponent of the same weight-category. Before and immediately after every fight, BM, countermovement jump (CMJ) height, and power production in the bench-press and half-squat exercises were assessed in the same order and on the same time of the day. A two-way repeated-measures ANOVA with the Bonferroni post-hoc analysis was used to determine the variations between pre- and post-measures. The statistical significance was set as p < 0.05. The athletes were able to maintain their baseline weight and physical performance throughout the experimental period, as shown by the lack of significant changes in BM, CMJ height, and upper- and lower-limb power output. Throughout a four-day qualifying tournament, the BM and power-related performance of Olympic boxers were not affected either by match execution or by successive matches. As scoring actions are highly dependent on muscle power, it is likely that these combat athletes are able to maintain optimal levels of performance across consecutive matches. Full article
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Concept Paper
Analysis of Pacing Strategies in AMRAP, EMOM, and FOR TIME Training Models during “Cross” Modalities
Sports 2021, 9(11), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9110144 - 20 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Empirically, it is widely discussed in “Cross” modalities that the pacing strategy developed by an athlete or trainee has a significant impact on the endurance performance in a WOD in the AMRAP, EMOM, or FOR TIME model. We can observe at least six [...] Read more.
Empirically, it is widely discussed in “Cross” modalities that the pacing strategy developed by an athlete or trainee has a significant impact on the endurance performance in a WOD in the AMRAP, EMOM, or FOR TIME model. We can observe at least six pacing strategies adopted during the cyclical modalities in the endurance performance in the scientific literature. However, besides these modalities, exercises of acyclical modalities of weightlifting and gymnastics are performed in the “Cross” modalities. These exercises may not allow the same pacing strategies adopted during cyclic modalities’ movements due to their motor characteristics and different intensity and level of effort imposed to perform the motor gesture. In addition to the intensity and level of effort that are generally unknown to the coach and athlete of the “Cross” modalities, another factor that can influence the adoption of a pacing strategy during a WOD in the AMRAP, EMOM, or FOR TIME model is the task endpoint knowledge, which varies according to the training model used. Thus, our objective was to evaluate situations in which these factors can influence the pacing strategies adopted in a self-regulated task with cyclic and acyclic modalities movements during an endurance workout in the AMRAP, EMOM, and FOR TIME model. Given the scarcity of studies in the scientific literature and the increasing discussion of this topic within the “Cross” modalities, this manuscript can help scientists and coaches better orient their research problems or training programs and analyze and interpret new findings more accurately. Full article
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