Effects of Music in Sport and Exercise

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2019) | Viewed by 13179

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Springfield College, Springfield, MA, USA
Interests: exercise psychology; music; affect; perceived exertion

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Guest Editor
Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, Sheffield Hallam University, UK
Interests: exercise psychology; behaviour change; audio and visual interventions; motivation; affect

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of music in sport and exercise contexts has been the subject of extensive research over the previous two decades. This proliferation of research and has resulted in a greater understanding of how music can be applied in sport and exercise, the benefits of listening to music, and potential mechanisms underpinning its efficacy. The application of music has typically fallen under four categories (i.e., pre-task, in-task synchronous, in-task asynchronous, and post-task), with the benefits of music including psychological (e.g., increased pleasure), psychophysical (e.g., lower RPE), psychophysiological (e.g. expedited recovery), and behavioral (e.g., increased work output). It is often suggested that these benefits arise as a consequence of cognitive dissociation, but other mechanisms and have also been proposed and recent evidence has begun to shed light on the neural mechanisms at play.

In this Special Issue, we aim to present the latest findings in sport- and exercise-related music research. We hope to bring together a collection of the innovative papers that have the potential to improve and advance the understanding and application of music in sport and exercise settings. We welcome original research, review articles, meta-analyses, case studies, and brief reports. The key topics for which we invite paper submissions include (although are not limited to):

  • Neural mechanisms underlying music effects in sport and exercise settings
  • Novel music and audio-visual interventions in sport and exercise settings
  • Research incorporating new music technologies in sport and exercise settings
  • Music research engaging unique populations (e.g., youth athletes and exercise participants, e-sports, individuals with disabilities, individuals with obesity and/or chronic disease).
  • Research examining the links between music use and longer-term adherence to exercise.
  • Critical appraisal of theoretical models and frameworks pertaining to the application of music in sport and exercise.

Prof. Jasmin Hutchinson
Dr. Leighton Jones
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • music
  • exercise
  • physical activity
  • sport
  • pleasure
  • attention
  • exercise strategies
  • motivation
  • psychophysiology
  • psychology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 696 KiB  
Article
Effects of Listening to Preferred versus Non-Preferred Music on Repeated Wingate Anaerobic Test Performance
by Christopher G. Ballmann, Daniel J. Maynard, Zachary N. Lafoon, Mallory R. Marshall, Tyler D. Williams and Rebecca R. Rogers
Sports 2019, 7(8), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7080185 - 29 Jul 2019
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 8016
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of listening to preferred or non-preferred music on repeated sprint performance. Fourteen physically active males (ages 18–25 years) were recruited for this study. In a counterbalanced crossover study design, participants completed two separate [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of listening to preferred or non-preferred music on repeated sprint performance. Fourteen physically active males (ages 18–25 years) were recruited for this study. In a counterbalanced crossover study design, participants completed two separate visits. During each visit, participants listened to either preferred or non-preferred music and completed 3 × 15 s Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAnTs) separated by 2 min active recovery periods. Each visit was separated by a minimal recovery period of 48 h. Anaerobic performance measures, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and motivation were analyzed. Mean power (p = 0.846, effect size (ES) = 0.019), anaerobic capacity (p = 0.686, ES = 0.058), and total work (p = 0.677, ES = 0.039) were not significantly different between preferred and non-preferred music conditions. Mean heart rate (p = 0.608; ES = 0.125) was also unchanged. Motivation to exercise (p < 0.001; ES = 1.520) was significantly higher in the preferred music condition. Additionally, the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) (p = 0.028; ES = 0.540) was significantly lower during the preferred music condition. Our results show that listening to preferred music showed no ergogenic benefit during repeated anaerobic cycling sprints when compared to non-preferred music. However, preferred music increased motivation to exercise and decreased perceived exertion. The results from this study could hold important implications for the application of music and enduring repeated high-intensity sprint exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Music in Sport and Exercise)
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15 pages, 231 KiB  
Article
A Qualitative Investigation of Music Use among Amateur and Semi-Professional Golfers
by Nicole T. Gabana, Jasmin Hutchinson, James Beauchemin, Matthew Powless, Julia Cawthra, Aaron Halterman and Jesse Steinfeldt
Sports 2019, 7(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7030060 - 5 Mar 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4323
Abstract
Music use in golf receives minimal attention from both applied and empirical perspectives. Golfers, coaches, and sport psychology practitioners alike may benefit from understanding and utilizing music within their work. Since music use in golf has become an increasingly common practice, the purpose [...] Read more.
Music use in golf receives minimal attention from both applied and empirical perspectives. Golfers, coaches, and sport psychology practitioners alike may benefit from understanding and utilizing music within their work. Since music use in golf has become an increasingly common practice, the purpose of the current study was to investigate current music use among golfers using a qualitative approach. Researchers aimed to identify potential psychological and physiological effects derived from music use during golf practice and pre-performance, given the limited empirical research in this area to date. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten amateur and semi-professional golfers (five male, five female, Mage = 22.9 years, SD = 5.04 years). Consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology was used to analyze the interview data. Six domains emerged from the CQR analysis regarding participants’ self-reported music use in golf: tempo, attention, physiological regulation, psychological regulation, effects of music on performance perceptions, and context (to use or not to use). Given the capacity of carefully selected music to elicit profound affective, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses, there is clear potential for mental performance consultants to utilize music in working with golfers in training contexts. Implications, caveats, and future research recommendations are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Music in Sport and Exercise)
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