Doping in Sports

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 5373

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Poljička cesta 35, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: test development; agility; strength and conditioning; training effects; doping in sports

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Doping in sports refers to the violation of one or more anti-doping rules, including the consumption of banned performance-enhancing substances (e.g., drugs) and/or the application of prohibited techniques. It is widely known and proven that doping is associated with serious negative health consequences (i.e., high blood pressure, increased risk of cardiovascular and liver disease, hypertension, libido disorders, psychological dependence), in addition to being associated with several sudden deaths in modern sport, and doping clearly corrupts the essence, image, and value of sport. Consequently, the global fight against doping in sports is highly prioritized. Unfortunately, the usage of doping spreads beyond competitive sports, and there is a growing body of evidence of doping behavior even in recreational sports. As a result, health authorities are increasingly aware of the necessity of systematic education about the doping problem, even within the field of public health.

This Special Issue is focused on (but not limited to) a variety of problems directly and indirectly related to the problem of doping (both in competitive and recreational sports), and we welcome the submission of reports dealing with the prevalence of doping (both current and anticipated), quantitative and qualitative analyses of factors associated with doping, etc. Due to the evident lack of reports with specific subsamples, sport-specific studies (i.e., athletes involved in a specific sport and/or group of sports), females, and youth athletes are particularly encouraged. We would gladly overview interdisciplinary studies and topic-oriented case reports about specific health-related problems associated with doping as well.

Prof. Dr. Damir Sekulic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • risk factors
  • protective factors
  • performance enhancement
  • dietary supplements
  • doping
  • health consequences
  • fair play

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 373 KiB  
Article
Doping Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices among Young, Amateur Croatian Athletes
by Ivan Miskulin, Danijela Stimac Grbic and Maja Miskulin
Sports 2021, 9(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9020025 - 9 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4098
Abstract
Recent studies revealed that amateur athletes, especially young ones, have an increasing tendency of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) usage. The aim of this study was to explore PEDs attitudes, beliefs, and practices among young, amateur Croatian athletes. This cross-sectional study using a specially designed [...] Read more.
Recent studies revealed that amateur athletes, especially young ones, have an increasing tendency of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) usage. The aim of this study was to explore PEDs attitudes, beliefs, and practices among young, amateur Croatian athletes. This cross-sectional study using a specially designed questionnaire as a research tool was done during the August 2019 to January 2020 period among a convenient sample of 400 amateur athletes of median age 18 (interquartile range 15 to 21) years. The prevalence of current PEDs usage was 1.3%, while past PEDs usage prevalence was 3.3%. Current PEDs usage was more frequent among young adults (p = 0.048) and athletes playing individual sports (p = 0.001). Athletes who were engaged in sports from one to five years had more permissive attitudes toward PEDs (p < 0.001) as measured by the Performance Enhancement Attitude Scale. Female athletes had more positive beliefs about PEDs usage (p = 0.008). The study did not establish any correlation between current or past PEDs usage and attitudes toward PEDs as well as beliefs about PEDs usage. However, there was a weak positive correlation between attitudes toward PEDs and athletes’ beliefs about PEDs usage (rs = 0.465, p < 0.001). PEDs usage is present among young Croatian amateur athletes. There is a need for interventions directed toward the prevention of PEDs usage in an observed subgroup of athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Doping in Sports)
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