Special Issue "Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World"

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Joanna Swanger

Earlham College, 801 National Road West, Richmond, IN 47374, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 765 983 1660
Interests: labor history; border studies; globalization; economic justice; peace studies; social movements; 20th century Cuba; 20th century Chile; current history; Mexico-U.S. borderlands

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on: organizing in the era of globalization, with a particular emphasis on cross-border organizing (and obstacles to these attempts); the role of memory and identity formation in diasporic and other borderlands contexts; and political subjectivity in an era in which nation-state sovereignty is being contested by economic globalization. The scope reaches across a variety of geographical locations (Southeast Asia, Latin America/U.S., the African diaspora, the Palestinian diaspora, indigenous movements, and Eurasia) and draws from a variety of disciplinary frames, especially anthropology, political science, and critical geography. The purpose will be to provide insights that can be of use to transnational movements. The Special Issue will be situated in existing literature by taking up the most salient question currently being posed theoretically in Border Studies—i.e., how one “does politics” in a post-Westphalian world in which nation-state sovereignty is diminished—with reference to specific social and geopolitical contexts.

Prof. Joanna Swanger
Guest Editor

References:

Wendy Brown. Walled States, Waning Sovereignty. New York: Zone Books, 2010.
Chris Rumford. Cosmopolitan Borders. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.
Anssi Paasi, “Bounded spaces in a ‘borderless world’: Border studies, power and the anatomy of territory.” Journal of Power 2 (2009): 213–34.
Dorte Jagetic Andersen. “Do if you Dare: Reflections on (Un)familiarity, Identity Formation and Ontological Politics.” Journal of Borderlands Studies29 (2014): 327–37. 

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • political subjectivity
  • diasporic subjectivity
  • cross-border organizing
  • transnational organizing
  • diasporic identities
  • post-Westphalian

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Languaging the Borders of Europe
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(4), 1207-1228; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4041207
Received: 6 July 2015 / Revised: 4 November 2015 / Accepted: 13 November 2015 / Published: 30 November 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (271 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Emerging from a discomfort with the blind spots encountered within and across theorizations of language and space in the field of human geography, in this article, we argue for “making space” for conceptualizations that speak from and through the everyday territories of migrants [...] Read more.
Emerging from a discomfort with the blind spots encountered within and across theorizations of language and space in the field of human geography, in this article, we argue for “making space” for conceptualizations that speak from and through the everyday territories of migrants in Europe today. Inspired by a range of writers thinking postcolonially and multi/trans-lingually, the authors draw on their own embodied migrant experience to argue for re-envisioning Europe’s borders through multiple languaging practices. “Languaging”, in this view, takes linguistic practices in a migrant context as an inherently prosthetic activity, whereby any dominant, national host language is inevitably subject to the subterranean rumblings of all the languages a migrant brings with her on her global journeys. Conceived as being saturated with prosthetic “absence(s)”, migrant languaging practices rework cultural geography’s bounded, inward-looking, and security-fixated understanding of the language/territory nexus, the better to open a vital space for re-envisioning language’s everyday territories as sites for translational solidarity and becoming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
Open AccessArticle
Airport Casualties: Non-Admission and Return Risks at Times of Internalized/Externalized Border Controls
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(3), 742-757; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4030742
Received: 29 May 2015 / Revised: 16 July 2015 / Accepted: 20 July 2015 / Published: 17 September 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (239 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article analyzes what can happen to forced returnees upon arrival in their country of nationality. Subjective configurations of state agents in the Global South have created return risks, which in turn transform subjectivities of post-colonial citizens. The article contributes to this Special [...] Read more.
This article analyzes what can happen to forced returnees upon arrival in their country of nationality. Subjective configurations of state agents in the Global South have created return risks, which in turn transform subjectivities of post-colonial citizens. The article contributes to this Special Issue by tracing repercussions of the externalization and internalization of border controls. In the case of Cameroon, these connections have resulted in the criminalization of emigration. Aspiring migrants are prosecuted if their departure projects fail to respect the entry requirements of countries in the Global North. The article is based on research conducted in Douala, Cameroon, in the form of discussions with control agents at the international airport, investigations at a prison, a review of related case law, police registers and interviews with Cameroonians returnees (November 2013–January 2014). Border controls and connected anti-fraud programs suppress family-based forms of solidarity and allow only for subjectivities rooted in state-managed forms of national identity. The article illustrates how efforts to combat fraud fuel corruption in returnees’ social networks, whereby, instead of receiving remittances, families in emigration countries have to mobilize financial resources in order to liberate returnees from police stations or prison complexes. Migration related detention of nationals in the Global South highlights the growing significance of exit controls in migration management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
Open AccessArticle
Reconceptualizing Cultural Globalization: Connecting the “Cultural Global” and the “Cultural Local”
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(3), 630-645; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4030630
Received: 21 December 2014 / Revised: 13 July 2015 / Accepted: 30 July 2015 / Published: 19 August 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Scholars generally are in agreement that the pace of globalization is rapidly accelerating. Globalization’s impact, beyond the socio-economic and political discourses, is affecting conceptions of culture and cultural studies, and changing and restructuring spaces, global, national and personal interactions and relationships. The “texts” [...] Read more.
Scholars generally are in agreement that the pace of globalization is rapidly accelerating. Globalization’s impact, beyond the socio-economic and political discourses, is affecting conceptions of culture and cultural studies, and changing and restructuring spaces, global, national and personal interactions and relationships. The “texts” and artifacts borne of culture—activities, events and our conception thereof are a mechanism for the propagation of culture. Simultaneously Westernization/Americanization impacts local cultures through consumerism, which obfuscates local traditions, knowledge and experiences. This research argues that culture is a dynamic, adaptive concept and practice, “borrowing” liberally from ideological and technological innovations of other cultures and integrating these borrowed aspects into the construction and modification of culture across spatial and geographical divides to ensure particular cultures’ survival. The research shows that the local affects the global, and vice versa. It selects local communication “texts” to show that cultures are not “victims” of globalization or the proliferation of mass media. Cultures actively adopt and integrate globalization’s technological artifacts. Globalization’s positive effects are dynamic and span cultural interactions and permeate structures of authority at personal, national and global levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
Open AccessArticle
Deviant Citizenship: DREAMer Activism in the United States and Transnational Belonging
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(3), 582-597; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4030582
Received: 4 May 2015 / Revised: 2 July 2015 / Accepted: 8 July 2015 / Published: 10 August 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (208 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
My analysis places the assertions of political presence by non-citizen immigrant youth in the U.S. (often referred to as DREAMers) within a rapidly globalizing world; this placement re-frames the DREAMers’ movement from a fight for U.S. citizenship to a broader critique of the [...] Read more.
My analysis places the assertions of political presence by non-citizen immigrant youth in the U.S. (often referred to as DREAMers) within a rapidly globalizing world; this placement re-frames the DREAMers’ movement from a fight for U.S. citizenship to a broader critique of the limits and impossibility of liberal democratic citizenship, which claims to be all-inclusive. Increased transnational migration has brought into stark relief the inequality that current frameworks of nation-state citizenship, as a caste-system of rights, have codified. I am interested in the activism of immigrant youth as a place to explore where immigrants themselves are reasserting the right to politics. This reassertion privileges the social embeddedness of family ties and community above the notion of individual choice or individual rationality. In doing so, this articulation of politics is a critique of the liberal order by forcing the consideration of the contexts and structures that create migration, exploitation, and transnational communities of belonging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
Open AccessArticle
The Struggles of Solidarity: Chicana/o-Mexican Networks, 1960s–1970s
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(3), 520-532; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4030520
Received: 15 May 2015 / Accepted: 9 June 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, members of the Chicana/o Movement reached across class, borders, and ideologies to proclaim a political solidarity with the Mexican Left. Both, Chicana/os and Mexican activists expressed a narrative of political solidarity that encompassed a perceived shared experience of [...] Read more.
Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, members of the Chicana/o Movement reached across class, borders, and ideologies to proclaim a political solidarity with the Mexican Left. Both, Chicana/os and Mexican activists expressed a narrative of political solidarity that encompassed a perceived shared experience of oppression and struggles for liberation. I contend, however, that both groups saw the source of their oppression and forms of resistance through different lenses. Chicana/o activists identified racism, discrimination, and cultural erasure with oppression, and they retrofit Mexican nationalism with political radicalism. In contrast, Mexican activists celebrated Marxist ideologies as radical political resistance against an increasing authoritarian government and associated Mexican nationalism with state repression and political manipulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
Open AccessArticle
Cross-Border Governance: Balancing Formalized and Less Formalized Co-Operations
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(3), 499-519; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4030499
Received: 19 May 2015 / Revised: 19 May 2015 / Accepted: 10 July 2015 / Published: 21 July 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1067 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper analyses cross-border co-operation with regard to its degree of formalization. Herewith, the focus is not on single cross-border organizations, but on the encompassing governance systems in the respective regions. That means that the specific combination of differently organized cross-border arrangements is [...] Read more.
The paper analyses cross-border co-operation with regard to its degree of formalization. Herewith, the focus is not on single cross-border organizations, but on the encompassing governance systems in the respective regions. That means that the specific combination of differently organized cross-border arrangements is analyzed. Cross-border governance systems are facing multiple governance challenges which ask either for a certain degree of institutionalization or for more informal solutions. Based on an empirical comparison of the two experienced, but differently organized, cross-border regions in Europe the Lake Constance Region and the Upper-Rhine Region, the paper illustrates that the organizational variation of cross-border governance systems show specific patterns. From these findings, first arguments are deduced for balancing formalized and more informal co-operations in cross-border governance systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
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Open AccessArticle
Imagined Borders: (Un)Bounded Spaces of Oil Extraction and Indigenous Sociality in “Post-Neoliberal” Ecuador
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(2), 434-458; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4020434
Received: 3 May 2015 / Revised: 4 June 2015 / Accepted: 5 June 2015 / Published: 10 June 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (257 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we analyze state practices of border-making through an ethnographic focus on Ecuadorian Amazonia and the Waorani, an Indigenous society, who, before sustained contact with the outside world began in 1958, possessed stark spatial and social borders often reinforced through warfare. [...] Read more.
In this paper, we analyze state practices of border-making through an ethnographic focus on Ecuadorian Amazonia and the Waorani, an Indigenous society, who, before sustained contact with the outside world began in 1958, possessed stark spatial and social borders often reinforced through warfare. Following that contact and the creation of various iterations of a legally-demarcated Waorani territory, the spatial and social borders of Waorani culture, based on a common property regime, came into conflict with the borders produced by the state in cooperation with transnational capitalism in the form of the oil industry. We discuss how these shifting borders led to cascading effects on Waorani reciprocity, their relationship to natural resources, sense of security and designation of membership in the community. Finally, we discuss how the leftist Ecuadorian state under President Rafael Correa justifies and facilitates the country’s oil-focused spatial processes through a post-neoliberal discourse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cross-Border Movements and Subjectivities in a Globalized World)
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