Sustainability, Resilience and Inclusivity through the ‘15-Minute City’ Concept

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Science and Humanities for Smart Cities".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 33031

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chaire Entrepreneuriat Territoire Innovation (ETI), Groupe de Recherche en Gestion des Organisations (GREGOR), IAE Paris – Sorbonne Business School, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, 75013 Paris, France
Interests: sustainability; complexity; climate change; 15-minute city; smart cities

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chaire Entrepreneuriat Territoire Innovation (ETI), Groupe de Recherche en Gestion des Organisations (GREGOR), IAE Paris – Sorbonne Business School, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, 75013 Paris, France
Interests: entrepreneurship; urban governance; urban economics; sustainability; resilience

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chaire Entrepreneuriat Territoire Innovation (ETI), Groupe de Recherche en Gestion des Organisations (GREGOR), IAE Paris – Sorbonne Business School, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, 75013 Paris, France
Interests: smart cities; 15-minute city; resilience; innovation; entrepreneurship

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Curtin Mauritius, Charles Telfair Campus, Moka, Mauritius
Interests: smart cities; resilience; future cities; sustainability; urban theory
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban areas have improved over the years to pursue increased sustainability, livability status, and resilience, as well as better economic and social dimensions, aided with the context of the digital revolution. Unsurprisingly, smart cities have been put under scrutiny, and have led to numerous debates regarding their technological biases, their (un)sustainability, or their (in)ability to cope with social issues. The COVID-19 pandemic has further fragmented societies and accelerated technological adoption in cities, which is now seen as a necessity. This calls for reinforcing discussions about the necessity of re-designing cities that promote a better quality of life through technological setups.

An emerging urban concept which advocates for the use of technology for sustainability, resilience, and place identity is that of the “15-minute city”, which also gained traction during the pandemic. The concept, riding on proximity-based planning ideals, encourages urban neighborhoods to accommodate an optimal density with access to basic essential services within a 15-min walking or cycling distance. The concept envisions that residents will thus be able to experience a higher quality of life, as they will be required to travel less to access basic facilities such as public spaces, with increased time and opportunities to interact with other members of the community and accomplish other social functions, which are increasingly important but which have been lacking as a core function of contemporary urban planning models. This Issue thus welcomes contributions that explores the concept of the “15-minute city” across the intersecting themes of urban theory, smart cities and urban sustainability, and relating to urban concepts of hyper-proximity, topophilia, chrono-urbanism, and further calls for contributions that dwell into proximity-based planning ideals within urban technological milieus. We are particularly interested in welcoming submissions that approach both theory and practice, including case studies and best practices, and support full articles, short communications, and perspective papers.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Moreno
Prof. Dr. Didier Chabaud
Dr. Florent Pratlong
Dr. Zaheer Allam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 15-minute city
  • sustainable cities
  • urban economics
  • smart cities
  • urban resilience
  • place identity

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 1744 KiB  
Article
Urban Planning in the 15-Minute City: Revisited under Sustainable and Smart City Developments until 2030
by Georgia Pozoukidou and Margarita Angelidou
Smart Cities 2022, 5(4), 1356-1375; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities5040069 - 13 Oct 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 17681
Abstract
The 15-minute-city concept represents an increasingly popular urban policymaking and planning paradigm that seeks to shift attention to the neighborhood as a “place” rather merely a spatial and functional planning unit. The core premise of the concept is that critical urban services and [...] Read more.
The 15-minute-city concept represents an increasingly popular urban policymaking and planning paradigm that seeks to shift attention to the neighborhood as a “place” rather merely a spatial and functional planning unit. The core premise of the concept is that critical urban services and amenities should be reachable within 15 min of walking or cycling from a residence. The urban-planning principles that enable the realization of the 15-minute city variably embody planning in mixed-use neighborhood units, proximity-based planning, planning for active transport, citizen participation in planning, and innovation and intelligence-driven planning. We revisit these urban-planning premises in the light of emerging social, physical, and structural developments through 2030, with a focus on European cases. The findings provide important additions and recommendations to the urban-planning principles of 15-minute cities along the themes of proximity-based planning, the use of land and urban form, urban governance and citizen participation, and inclusive digitalization. The paper moves the discussion on the 15-minute city forward and will be helpful for urban planners, policymakers, and scholars seeking to envision and create a more sustainable, inclusive, and vibrant future in cities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 63967 KiB  
Article
Barcelona under the 15-Minute City Lens: Mapping the Accessibility and Proximity Potential Based on Pedestrian Travel Times
by Carles Ferrer-Ortiz, Oriol Marquet, Laia Mojica and Guillem Vich
Smart Cities 2022, 5(1), 146-161; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities5010010 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 51 | Viewed by 14156
Abstract
Many academics, urban planners and policymakers subscribe to the benefits of implementing the concept of the 15-Minute City (FMC) in metropolises across the globe. Despite the interest raised by the concept, and other variants of chrono-urbanism, to date, only a few studies have [...] Read more.
Many academics, urban planners and policymakers subscribe to the benefits of implementing the concept of the 15-Minute City (FMC) in metropolises across the globe. Despite the interest raised by the concept, and other variants of chrono-urbanism, to date, only a few studies have evaluated cities from the FMC perspective. Most studies on the subject also lack a proper well-defined methodology that can properly assess FMC conditions. In this context, this study contributes to the development of an appropriate FMC-measuring method by using network analysis for services and activities in the City of Barcelona (Catalonia, northeastern Spain). By using network analyst and basing our analysis on cadastral parcels, this study is able to detail the overall accessibility conditions of the city and its urban social functions based on the FMC perspective. The resulting spatial synthetic index is enhanced with the creation of partial indexes measuring the impact of education, provisioning, entertainment, public and non-motorized transport, and care facilities. The results show that most residents of this dense and compact city live in areas with proximity to services, that can clearly be labeled as FMC, although there are some shortfalls in peripheral areas. Results validate the FMC methodology as a viable method to highlight spatial inequalities at the microscale level, a valuable tool for the development of effective planning policies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop