Special Issue "Separation Techniques for Dairy Analysis"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Gavino Sanna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, via Vienna 2, Sassari 07100, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; validation of analytical methods; chemometrics and data analysis; environmental chemistry and monitoring; food chemistry and analysis; speciation analysis; science of materials; electroanalytical methods; sensors and biosensors, modification of electrode surfaces; gas-chromatography; liquid chromatography; hyphenated methods; ICP-MS methods; FT-IR methods; determination of trace analytes in foods; food georeferencing and traceability; bioaccumulation of toxic elements in cereals; synthesis and characterization of conductive polymers; biomedical analysis in dental research, studies of equilibria in solution between metal ions and ligands of biological interest; ability of vegetal biomasses in removal of organic pollutants by wastewaters
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among major foods, milk plays a peculiar role due to its extraordinary complexity. As a matter of fact, proteins are dispersed and globules of lipids are emulsified in an aqueous solution containing saccharides, and organic and inorganic salts. Since each of these classes is represented by hundreds (or sometimes thousands) of individual chemical species, separation techniques have always played a crucial role in the analysis of milk and dairy foods. In addition, all of them contain a wide number of minor species, like vitamins, enzymes, and other bioactive compounds (peptides, nucleotides, hormones, etc.), all of th utmost importance in the nutrition of humans. Nowadays, modern analytical chemistry has to fulfil exciting and urgent challenges regarding a number of frontier aspects regarding quality and safety. Hence, this Special Issue of Separations is mainly focused on reporting the most recent and performing separation methods of all classes of compounds of milk and dairy products. A particular emphasis will be devoted to reporting on the assessment of fully-validated methods, able to couple high sensitivity and accuracy to significant savings of time and cost.

Prof. Dr. Gavino Sanna
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • dairy products
  • separations
  • chromatography
  • electrophoresis
  • mass spectrometry
  • lipids
  • fatty acids
  • proteins
  • saccharides
  • trace compounds
  • food quality
  • food safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biogenic Amines in Traditional Fiore Sardo PDO Sheep Cheese: Assessment, Validation and Application of an RP-HPLC-DAD-UV Method
Separations 2019, 6(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations6010011 - 19 Feb 2019
Abstract
This contribution aimed to measure for the first time the amount of biogenic amines (BAs) in one of the most ancient and traditional sheep cheese produced in Sardinia, Italy: the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Fiore Sardo. To achieve this, an original RP-HPLC-DAD-UV [...] Read more.
This contribution aimed to measure for the first time the amount of biogenic amines (BAs) in one of the most ancient and traditional sheep cheese produced in Sardinia, Italy: the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Fiore Sardo. To achieve this, an original RP-HPLC-DAD-UV method has been developed that was completely validated in terms of LoD, LoQ, linearity, precision and trueness, and tested on 36 real Fiore Sardo PDO cheese samples produced by four different cheesemakers and marketed by four stores. The average total concentration of the eight BAs (i.e., tyramine, tryptamine, histidine, putrescine, cadaverine, 2-phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine) measured in Fiore Sardo cheese was 700 mg/kg, with a range between 170 mg/kg and 1100 mg/kg. A great variability in the total amount of BAs has been evidenced among the Fiore Sardo marketed in the four stores as well as for the cheeses purchased in different times in the same store. Tyramine (350 mg/kg), putrescine (150 mg/kg), histamine (80 mg/kg) and cadaverine (30 mg/kg) are the most abundant BAs found in this matrix. Among the many factors concurring, the dominant microflora of Fiore Sardo PDO is likely the principal cause of the qualitative and quantitative distribution of BAs in this matrix. Finally, the total amount of BAs found in Fiore Sardo PDO is not able to cause any health alert situation for consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Separation Techniques for Dairy Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Total and Free Fatty Acids Analysis in Milk and Dairy Fat
Separations 2019, 6(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations6010014 - 05 Mar 2019
Abstract
Dairy fat is one of the most complex natural fats because of its fatty acid (FA) composition. Ruminant dairy fat contains more than 400 different FA varying in carbon chain length, and degree, position and configuration of unsaturation. The following article reviews the [...] Read more.
Dairy fat is one of the most complex natural fats because of its fatty acid (FA) composition. Ruminant dairy fat contains more than 400 different FA varying in carbon chain length, and degree, position and configuration of unsaturation. The following article reviews the different methods available to analyze FA (both total and free) in milk and dairy products. The most widely used methodology for separating and analyzing dairy FA is gas chromatography, coupled to a flame ionization detector (CG-FID). Alternatively, gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is also used. After lipid extraction, total FA (TFA) are commonly converted into their methyl esters (fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) prior to chromatographic analysis. In contrast, free FA (FFA) can be analyzed after conversion to FAME or directly as FFA after extraction from the product. One of the key questions when analyzing FAME from TFA is the selection of a proper column for separating them, which depends mainly on the objective of the analysis. Quantification is best achieved by the internal standard method. Recently, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been reported as promising techniques to analyze FA in milk and dairy products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Separation Techniques for Dairy Analysis)
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