Special Issue "Application of Chromatography and Different Extraction Techniques in Analysis of Polyphenolic Compounds"

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739). This special issue belongs to the section "Analysis of Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 2918

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Danijela Ašperger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: sample preparation; extraction techniques; liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry
Dr. Ivana Tomaz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Viticulture and Enology, Faculty Agriculture, University of Zagreb, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: LC-MS; GC-MS; UHPLC; electrophoresis; SPME; SPE; SLE; proteomics; metabolomics; extractions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polyphenolic compounds comprise a diverse class of chemical compounds present in different plants. Analysis of these compounds could be a challenge due to the complexity of plant materials and polyphenols. Notably, chromatographic methods are the golden standard for the separation and quantitation of these interesting molecules. Due to the different properties of various plant materials, it is mandatory to have a precise and reliable extraction and chromatographic method for the analysis of phenolic compounds.

This Special Issue will comprise research articles, short communications, and reviews related to the main analytical tools used for the analysis of polyphenolic compounds. Manuscripts concerning new analytical approaches with regard to plants, foods, and other products are welcome. Furthermore, research regarding other aspects, such as the application of chromatographic methods for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in a different type of sample, is also encouraged.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Danijela Ašperger
Dr. Ivana Tomaz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenolic compounds
  • plants
  • food
  • extraction techniques
  • liquid chromatography
  • mass spectrometry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Simple Method for the Determination of Polyphenolic Compounds from Grapevine Leaves
Separations 2022, 9(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9020024 - 20 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 761
Abstract
Grapevine leaves are photosynthetically the most active green organs providing carbohydrates that are of utmost importance for the regular vine’s metabolism and growth. Moreover, leaves are the pioneers of fungal infections caused by B. cinerea, E. necator, and P. viticola. Plant [...] Read more.
Grapevine leaves are photosynthetically the most active green organs providing carbohydrates that are of utmost importance for the regular vine’s metabolism and growth. Moreover, leaves are the pioneers of fungal infections caused by B. cinerea, E. necator, and P. viticola. Plant response to these microorganisms mostly depends on the content and composition of phenolic compounds abundantly found in the leaf’s outer tissues (epidermis, cuticle, trichomes). In order to obtain a satisfactory quantity of phenolic compounds, an experiment was conducted towards optimizing a solid–liquid extraction method. Variables were as follows: the type of organic solvent, the sample weight, the extraction temperature, and the extraction time. The optimal conditions were obtained by applying the response surface methodology. Therefore, by using acetonitrile as the organic solvent, conducting a single-step extraction at the temperature of 48 °C during the time period of 2 h and 25 min with a solid-to-solvent ratio of 1:56 g mL−1 (178 mg of leaves powder and 10 mL of extraction solvent) the optimal content of phenolic compounds was obtained. This protocol is reliable, fast, and relatively easy to perform for the determination of the abovementioned compounds. Full article
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Article
Identification of Tentative Traceability Markers with Direct Implications in Polyphenol Fingerprinting of Red Wines: Application of LC-MS and Chemometrics Methods
Separations 2021, 8(12), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8120233 - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 761
Abstract
This study investigated the potential of using the changes in polyphenol composition of red wine to enable a more comprehensive chemometric differentiation and suitable identification of authentication markers. Based on high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) data collected from Feteasca Neagra, Merlot, and [...] Read more.
This study investigated the potential of using the changes in polyphenol composition of red wine to enable a more comprehensive chemometric differentiation and suitable identification of authentication markers. Based on high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) data collected from Feteasca Neagra, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon finished wines, phenolic profiles of relevant classes were investigated immediately after vinification (Stage 1), after three months (Stage 2) and six months (Stage 3) of storage, respectively. The data were subjected to multivariate analysis, and resulted in an initial vintage differentiation by principal component analysis (PCA), and variety grouping by canonical discriminant analysis (CDA). Based on polyphenol common biosynthesis route and on the PCA correlation matrix, additional descriptors were investigated. We observed that the inclusion of specific compositional ratios into the data matrix allowed for improved sample differentiation. We obtained simultaneous discrimination according to the considered oenological factors (variety, vintage, and geographical origin) as well as the respective clustering applied during the storage period. Subsequently, further discriminatory investigations to assign wine samples to their corresponding classes relied on partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA); the classification models confirmed the clustering initially obtained by PCA. The benefits of the presented fingerprinting approach might justify its selection and warrant its potential as an applicable tool with improved authentication capabilities in red wines. Full article
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Article
Development of a Simple High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Based Method to Quantify Synergistic Compounds and Their Composition in Dried Leaf Extracts of Piper Sarmentosum Roxb.
Separations 2021, 8(9), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8090152 - 13 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 847
Abstract
There is a growing demand to enhance pharmaceutical and food safety using synergistic compounds from Piper sarmentosum Roxb., such as polyphenols and water-soluble vitamins. However, information on standardized analytical methods to identify and quantify these compounds of interest is limited. A reversed-phase high-performance [...] Read more.
There is a growing demand to enhance pharmaceutical and food safety using synergistic compounds from Piper sarmentosum Roxb., such as polyphenols and water-soluble vitamins. However, information on standardized analytical methods to identify and quantify these compounds of interest is limited. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD)-based method was developed to simultaneously detect and quantify the amounts of tannin, flavonoid, cinnamic acid, essential oil, and vitamins extracted from P. sarmentosum leaves using methanol, chloroform, and hexane. Commercially and non-commercially-cultivated P. sarmentosum leaves were subjected to seven different drying treatments (shade; sun; air oven at 40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C, and 100 °C; and freeze-drying) for three consecutive months. Most compounds were detected most efficiently at a detection wavelength of 272 nm. The developed method displayed good detection limits (LOD, 0.026–0.789 µg/mL; LOQ, 0.078–2.392 µg/mL), linearity (R2 > 0.999), precision (%RSD, <1.00), and excellent accuracy (96–102%). All P. sarmentosum leaf extracts were simultaneously tested and analytically compared without time-consuming fractionation. Methanolic plant extracts showed better peak area and retention time splits compared to chloroformic and hexanoic extracts. Differences in synergistic compound composition were dependent on the type of drying treatment but not on cultivation site and time of sampling. Flavonoid was identified as the dominant phytochemical component in P. sarmentosum leaves, followed by the essential oil, cinnamic acid, ascorbic acid, and tannin. Overall, we present a simple and reproducible chromatographic method that can be applied to identify different plant compounds. Full article
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