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Special Issue "Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shinya Maenosono

School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +81 761 51 1625
Interests: nanoparticles; nanocrystals; quantum dots; thermoelectrics; nanobiotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inorganic probes—including metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles—have attracted much attention both from fundamental and practical points of view, because of their size-dependent properties and fascinating functionality.

In particular, applications of inorganic nanoparticles cover a wide range of areas which take advantage of characteristics such as localized surface plasmon resonance, the quantum confinement effect and superparamagnetism. In addition, their flexibility for surface modification/functionalization helps to extend the range of applications, particularly in the biomedical field.

This special issue aims to cover all various aspects including, but not limited to, synthesis of novel inorganic nanoparticles as biological probes, and biomedical applications (imaging, sensing, diagnostics, therapeutics, etc.) of inorganic nanoparticles.

Prof. Dr. Shinya Maenosono
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning
Sensors 2015, 15(9), 24409-24427; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150924409
Received: 15 May 2015 / Revised: 2 September 2015 / Accepted: 14 September 2015 / Published: 22 September 2015
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete [...] Read more.
Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes)
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Open AccessArticle
Simultaneous Imaging of Two Different Cancer Biomarkers Using Aptamer-Conjugated Quantum Dots
Sensors 2015, 15(4), 8595-8604; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150408595
Received: 10 March 2015 / Revised: 6 April 2015 / Accepted: 9 April 2015 / Published: 13 April 2015
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (767 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studying gene expression profile in a single cancer cell is important because multiple genes are associated with cancer development. Quantum dots (QDs) have been utilized as biological probes for imaging and detection. QDs display specific optical and electrical properties that depend on their [...] Read more.
Studying gene expression profile in a single cancer cell is important because multiple genes are associated with cancer development. Quantum dots (QDs) have been utilized as biological probes for imaging and detection. QDs display specific optical and electrical properties that depend on their size that can be applied for imaging and sensing applications. In this study, simultaneous imaging of the cancer biomarkers, tenascin-C and nucleolin, was performed using two types of aptamer-conjugated QDs. The simultaneous imaging of these two different cancer markers in three cancer cell lines was reliable and cell line-specific. Current requirements for cancer imaging technologies include the need for simple preparation methods and the ability to detect multiple cancer biomarkers and evaluate their intracellular localizations. The method employed in this study is a feasible solution to these requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biomedical Probes Based on Inorganic Nanoparticles for Electrochemical and Optical Spectroscopy Applications
Sensors 2015, 15(9), 21427-21477; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150921427
Received: 30 June 2015 / Revised: 7 August 2015 / Accepted: 10 August 2015 / Published: 28 August 2015
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2087 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inorganic nanoparticles usually provide novel and unique physical properties as their size approaches nanometer scale dimensions. The unique physical and optical properties of nanoparticles may lead to applications in a variety of areas, including biomedical detection. Therefore, current research is now increasingly focused [...] Read more.
Inorganic nanoparticles usually provide novel and unique physical properties as their size approaches nanometer scale dimensions. The unique physical and optical properties of nanoparticles may lead to applications in a variety of areas, including biomedical detection. Therefore, current research is now increasingly focused on the use of the high surface-to-volume ratios of nanoparticles to fabricate superb chemical- or biosensors for various detection applications. This article highlights various kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, including metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, nanocomposites, and semiconductor nanoparticles that can be perceived as useful materials for biomedical probes and points to the outstanding results arising from their use in such probes. The progress in the use of inorganic nanoparticle-based electrochemical, colorimetric and spectrophotometric detection in recent applications, especially bioanalysis, and the main functions of inorganic nanoparticles in detection are reviewed. The article begins with a conceptual discussion of nanoparticles according to types, followed by numerous applications to analytes including biomolecules, disease markers, and pharmaceutical substances. Most of the references cited herein, dating from 2010 to 2015, generally mention one or more of the following characteristics: a low detection limit, good signal amplification and simultaneous detection capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes)
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Open AccessReview
Magnetic-Particle-Sensing Based Diagnostic Protocols and Applications
Sensors 2015, 15(6), 12983-12998; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150612983
Received: 16 April 2015 / Revised: 18 May 2015 / Accepted: 19 May 2015 / Published: 4 June 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3684 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Magnetic particle-labeled biomaterial detection has attracted much attention in recent years for a number of reasons; easy manipulation by external magnetic fields, easy functionalization of the surface, and large surface-to-volume ratio, to name but a few. In this review, we report on our [...] Read more.
Magnetic particle-labeled biomaterial detection has attracted much attention in recent years for a number of reasons; easy manipulation by external magnetic fields, easy functionalization of the surface, and large surface-to-volume ratio, to name but a few. In this review, we report on our recent investigations into the detection of nano-sized magnetic particles. First, the detection by Hall magnetic sensor with lock-in amplifier and alternative magnetic field is summarized. Then, our approach to detect sub-200 nm diameter target magnetic particles via relatively large micoro-sized “columnar particles” by optical microscopy is described. Subsequently, we summarize magnetic particle detection based on optical techniques; one method is based on the scattering of the magnetically-assembled nano-sized magnetic bead chain in rotating magnetic fields and the other one is based on the reflection of magnetic target particles and porous silicon. Finally, we report recent works with reference to more familiar industrial products (such as smartphone-based medical diagnosis systems and magnetic removal of unspecific-binded nano-sized particles, or “magnetic washing”). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes)
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Open AccessReview
Fabrication and Robotization of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors for Molecule Detection with Raman Scattering
Sensors 2015, 15(5), 10422-10451; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150510422
Received: 4 January 2015 / Revised: 9 April 2015 / Accepted: 14 April 2015 / Published: 4 May 2015
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (7092 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of [...] Read more.
In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles as Biomedical Probes)
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