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Special Issue "Biosensors in Clinical Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. María Jesús Lobo-Castañón
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Física y Analítica Universidad de Oviedo Av. Julián Clavería 8 33006 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: electrochemical biosensors; SPR sensors; aptamers; molecularly imprinted polymers; biomimetic receptors; food analysis; clinical analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthcare relies on the capability to measure different disease markers in biofluids, not only blood and urine but also external secretions such as saliva, tears, and sweat. Since the development of the first biosensor by Clark and Lyons in 1962 for the measurement of glucose in blood, many different biosensing platforms have been developed for measuring nearly any desired analyte in these fluids. These platforms integrate a biological or biomimetic receptor, such as enzymes, antibodies, aptamers, or peptides with a suitable physicochemical transducer, with the final aim of providing a direct reading of the levels of a specific analyte in the sample. This technology seeks to facilitate point-of-care diagnostics, bringing the clinical laboratory to the doctor or the patient.

This Special Issue will provide an overview of the most recent developments in the design of biosensing platforms for clinical applications. Regardless of what combination of recognition element/signal transduction is employed, research articles and reviews focused on devices useful for non-invasive or minimally invasive measurement of analytes in biofluids are welcome. Biosensors that are at multiple stages of development and even in the commercialization pathway can be presented, thus, providing an idea of the multiple opportunities in this field.

Prof. Dr. María Jesús Lobo-Castañón
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aptasensors
  • Enzyme-based sensors
  • Healthcare
  • Immunosensors
  • Nano-enabled biosensors
  • Nucleic acid sensor
  • Personalized medicine
  • Printed biosensor
  • Wearables

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
High-Sensitivity Dual-Probe Detection of Urinary miR-141 in Cancer Patients via a Modified Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode-Based Electrochemical Biosensor
Sensors 2021, 21(9), 3183; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21093183 - 03 May 2021
Viewed by 354
Abstract
The screening and diagnosis of cancer are hallmarks of medicine in the aging population. Recently, microRNAs have shown potential for use as biomarkers, which could advance the field of diagnostics. The presence of miRNA-141 in the serum has been well described in several [...] Read more.
The screening and diagnosis of cancer are hallmarks of medicine in the aging population. Recently, microRNAs have shown potential for use as biomarkers, which could advance the field of diagnostics. The presence of miRNA-141 in the serum has been well described in several malignancies. However, the invasive approach used for sampling represents the major limitation for its practical application and, hence, its notable absence as a method for screening the general population. In light of this, we aimed to develop a high-sensitivity microRNA (miR) biosensor for application in the diagnosis of all miR-141-associated cancers, such as colorectal cancer (CRC) and breast cancer (BC). The novelty lies in our dual-probe design, which is reliant on the hybridization of the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) targeting probe onto an existing sample of urinary miR-141 in the first step, followed by complementary binding with a biotinylated probe that has been coated on a modified screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). The hybridization of the probe and sensor produces signals via the catalytic reduction of H2O2 at HRP-modified SPCEs in the presence of H2O, which was measured by either cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry (CA) currents. In our study, the detection and expression of miR-141 in a cohort of colorectal cancer (n = 6) and breast cancer (n = 4) samples showed that its levels were significantly higher than in a healthy cohort (n = 9) (p < 0.004). Moreover, our miR sensor demonstrated high stability, reliability, and sensitivity (p < 0.0001). This work hopefully provides new information for the detection and monitoring of de novo and existing cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Clinical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
New Uses for the Personal Glucose Meter: Detection of Nucleic Acid Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Screening
Sensors 2020, 20(19), 5514; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195514 - 26 Sep 2020
Viewed by 636
Abstract
A personal glucose meter (PGM)-based method for quantitative detection of a urinary nucleic acid biomarker in prostate cancer screening, the so-called PCA3, is reported herein. A sandwich-type genoassay is conducted on magnetic beads to collect the target from the sample by specific hybridization, [...] Read more.
A personal glucose meter (PGM)-based method for quantitative detection of a urinary nucleic acid biomarker in prostate cancer screening, the so-called PCA3, is reported herein. A sandwich-type genoassay is conducted on magnetic beads to collect the target from the sample by specific hybridization, making the assay appropriate for PCA3 detection in biological fluids. The success of the method hinges on the use of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to link the amount of nucleic acid biomarker to the generation of glucose. In particular, specifically attached ALP molecules hydrolyze D-glucose-1-phosphate into D-glucose, thus enabling the amplification of the recorded signal on the personal glucose meter. The developed genoassay exhibits good sensitivity (3.3 ± 0.2 mg glucose dL−1 pM−1) for PCA3, with a dynamic range of 5 to 100 pM and a quantification limit of 5 pM. Likewise, it facilitates point-of-care testing of nucleic acid biomarkers by using off-the-shelf PGM instead of complex instrumentation involved in traditional laboratory-based tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Clinical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Designing and Implementing an Implantable Wireless Micromanometer System for Real-Time Bladder Pressure Monitoring: A Preliminary Study
Sensors 2020, 20(16), 4610; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20164610 - 17 Aug 2020
Viewed by 528
Abstract
Many mini-implantable devices have been developed and fabricated for diagnostic and treatment purposes. Wireless implantable biomicrosystems provide a desirable approach for long-term physiological signal monitoring. In this study, we implemented a wireless implantable biomicrosystem for bladder-cavity pressure measurements in a freely moving rabbit. [...] Read more.
Many mini-implantable devices have been developed and fabricated for diagnostic and treatment purposes. Wireless implantable biomicrosystems provide a desirable approach for long-term physiological signal monitoring. In this study, we implemented a wireless implantable biomicrosystem for bladder-cavity pressure measurements in a freely moving rabbit. To manage the power more effectively, a magnetic reed switch was applied to turn on/off the implantable module using a neodymium–iron–boron (NdFeB) magnet. The measured bladder pressure signal was wirelessly transmitted from the implantable module to a host unit. Our results indicated that the implantable biomicrosystem exhibited satisfactory performance and safety, as evidenced by an error percentage of less than ±1% for pressure measurements and less than 2 °C of a temperature rise under normal operation. The wireless biomicrosystem was implanted into the bladder cavity of a rabbit. Bladder pressure was simultaneously measured by both the biomicrosystem and conventional cystometry in the animal. The two signals were similar during the voiding phase, with a correlation coefficient of 0.885. Additionally, the biomicrosystem coated with polydimethylsiloxane in this study showed no cytotoxicity, which confirmed its biocompatibility. In conclusion, we demonstrated a good biocompatible wireless biomicrosystem which showed good reproducibility with respect to pressure monitoring by conventional cystometry. Further studies are needed to confirm the results of this preliminary feasibility study for actual clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Clinical Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Revisiting Electrochemical Biosensing in the 21st Century Society for Inflammatory Cytokines Involved in Autoimmune, Neurodegenerative, Cardiac, Viral and Cancer Diseases
Sensors 2021, 21(1), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010189 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 638
Abstract
The multifaceted key roles of cytokines in immunity and inflammatory processes have led to a high clinical interest for the determination of these biomolecules to be used as a tool in the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of several diseases of great current [...] Read more.
The multifaceted key roles of cytokines in immunity and inflammatory processes have led to a high clinical interest for the determination of these biomolecules to be used as a tool in the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of several diseases of great current relevance (autoimmune, neurodegenerative, cardiac, viral and cancer diseases, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes). Therefore, the rapid and accurate determination of cytokine biomarkers in body fluids, cells and tissues has attracted considerable attention. However, many currently available techniques used for this purpose, although sensitive and selective, require expensive equipment and advanced human skills and do not meet the demands of today’s clinic in terms of test time, simplicity and point-of-care applicability. In the course of ongoing pursuit of new analytical methodologies, electrochemical biosensing is steadily gaining ground as a strategy suitable to develop simple, low-cost methods, with the ability for multiplexed and multiomics determinations in a short time and requiring a small amount of sample. This review article puts forward electrochemical biosensing methods reported in the last five years for the determination of cytokines, summarizes recent developments and trends through a comprehensive discussion of selected strategies, and highlights the challenges to solve in this field. Considering the key role demonstrated in the last years by different materials (with nano or micrometric size and with or without magnetic properties), in the design of analytical performance-enhanced electrochemical biosensing strategies, special attention is paid to the methods exploiting these approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors in Clinical Applications)
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