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Special Issue "Whole-Cell Biosensors: Recent Advances"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rawil F. Fakhrullin
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kreml uramı 18, Kazan 420008, Republic of Tatarstan, Russian Federation
Interests: drug delivery vehicles; tissue engineering; halloysite; whole-cell biosensors; electrochemical biosensors; quarz crystal microbalance; microscopy; cell surface engineering; nanotoxicology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Fabrication of whole-cell biosensors is a fascinating direction in bioanalytical chemistry. Arguably, whole-cell biosensors represent the most interesting and intriguing part of the biosensors family. In whole-cell biosensor, we benefit from the analytical response of the cellular machinery orchestrated by the synergy of nucleic acids and enzymes. Essentially, the simplest (yet fully functional) whole-cell biosensors do not even require any physical transduser, relying on direct observations of cellular responses to various analytes manifested in luminescence intesity changes or similar sygnals. More elaborate devices, in general, follow the classical biosensor setup structure, where the biological sensing elements (live cells) are incorporated into a certain elecronic device capable of sensing the (bio)chemical changes within the cells. This opens avenues for effective and selective detection of various analytes. Therefore, whole-cell biosensors hold a great promise in current bioanalytical chemistry, attracting attention of the researchers worldwide.

This Special Issue is focused on recent advances in the field of whole-cells biosensors. Both review and original research articles are invited. In addition to papers reproting the fabrication and applications of whole-cell biosensors, contributions featuring other areas related to whole-cells biosensors, such as genetic modifications of reporter cell or cell immobilisation or cell surface modifications. In addition, manuscripts reporting technological advances towards more effective whole-cell biosensors, such as development of novel analytical platforms, improvement of data acquisition and introduction of novel measurement or data processing techniques will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Rawil F. Fakhrullin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Whole-cell biosensors
  • Diagnostics
  • Reporter cells
  • Microfluidic biosensing devices
  • Electrochemical biosensors
  • Cell surface engineering

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
CellCountCV—A Web-Application for Accurate Cell Counting and Automated Batch Processing of Microscopic Images Using Fully Convolutional Neural Networks
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3653; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133653 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
In vitro cellular models are promising tools for studying normal and pathological conditions. One of their important applications is the development of genetically engineered biosensor systems to investigate, in real time, the processes occurring in living cells. At present, there are fluorescence, protein-based, [...] Read more.
In vitro cellular models are promising tools for studying normal and pathological conditions. One of their important applications is the development of genetically engineered biosensor systems to investigate, in real time, the processes occurring in living cells. At present, there are fluorescence, protein-based, sensory systems for detecting various substances in living cells (for example, hydrogen peroxide, ATP, Ca2+ etc.,) or for detecting processes such as endoplasmic reticulum stress. Such systems help to study the mechanisms underlying the pathogenic processes and diseases and to screen for potential therapeutic compounds. It is also necessary to develop new tools for the processing and analysis of obtained microimages. Here, we present our web-application CellCountCV for automation of microscopic cell images analysis, which is based on fully convolutional deep neural networks. This approach can efficiently deal with non-convex overlapping objects, that are virtually inseparable with conventional image processing methods. The cell counts predicted with CellCountCV were very close to expert estimates (the average error rate was < 4%). CellCountCV was used to analyze large series of microscopic images obtained in experimental studies and it was able to demonstrate endoplasmic reticulum stress development and to catch the dose-dependent effect of tunicamycin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Whole-Cell Biosensors: Recent Advances)
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