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Special Issue "Textile-Based Sensors: E-textiles, Devices, and Integrated Systems"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hyun-Joong Chung
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Interests: soft materials; hydrogels; elastomers; bioelectronics; e-textiles
Dr. Patricia Dolez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Human Ecology, Faculty of Agriculture, Life, Environmental Sciences, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Interests: Application of nanotechnologies; smart textiles; natural fibres; and recycled materials in personal protective equipment and other textile-based products & aging behavior of protective materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The comfort of the wearers is the most important feature for wearable sensors and electronics for healthcare, Internet of Things, soft robotics, and other work-related and general consumer applications. From thousands of years of history, textiles have been developed to ensure optimal comfort for wearers. System integration of these sensory devices can be benefited from recently burgeoning fields of smart textiles and stretchable electronics. The field of “Textile-Based Sensors” is an interdisciplinary engineering field that requires a comprehensive understanding of textile science, materials science, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemistry, and physics at practical levels, as well as the 'human' aspects such as ergonomics, psychology, and rehabilitation medicine.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together innovative developments in a broad spectrum of sensors that utilizes textiles as wearable substrates or as an active component of the devices. Papers addressing the wide range of aspects of this technology are sought, including, but not limited to, recent developments in new active and passive material components for textile-based electronics and sensors, fundamental and applied science issues underlying e-textile systems and their fabrication, technologies for process integration, and studies on real-life applications, including clinical healthcare applications.

Both review articles and original research papers are solicited. There is particular interest in papers envisioning innovative sensor applications that have not been possible with conventional rigid materials and form factors.

Dr. Hyun-Joong Chung
Dr. Patricia Dolez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • E-textiles
  • Smart textiles
  • Materials and coatings for functional fibers
  • Printed electronics/sensors
  • Electronic yarns and novel fabric materials
  • Technology transfer from fibers to the garment
  • Sensor hardware system integration
  • Packaging, wearability and user-acceptance
  • Reliability, washability and durability
  • Energy harvesting and power storage
  • Hardware and software co-design
  • Wearable healthcare prototypes and applications
  • Rehabilitation, sensory monitoring and injury prevention
  • Applications to fashion industries
  • Internet of Things
  • System energy/power management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ultrasensitive Strain Sensor Based on Pre-Generated Crack Networks Using Ag Nanoparticles/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) Hybrid Fillers and a Polyester Woven Elastic Band
Sensors 2021, 21(7), 2531; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072531 - 04 Apr 2021
Viewed by 360
Abstract
Flexible strain sensors are receiving a great deal of interest owing to their prospective applications in monitoring various human activities. Among various efforts to enhance the sensitivity of strain sensors, pre-crack generation has been well explored for elastic polymers but rarely on textile [...] Read more.
Flexible strain sensors are receiving a great deal of interest owing to their prospective applications in monitoring various human activities. Among various efforts to enhance the sensitivity of strain sensors, pre-crack generation has been well explored for elastic polymers but rarely on textile substrates. Herein, a highly sensitive textile-based strain sensor was fabricated via a dip-coat-stretch approach: a polyester woven elastic band was dipped into ink containing single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with silver paste and pre-stretched to generate prebuilt cracks on the surface. Our sensor demonstrated outstanding sensitivity (a gauge factor of up to 3550 within a strain range of 1.5–5%), high stability and durability, and low hysteresis. The high performance of this sensor is attributable to the excellent elasticity and woven structure of the fabric substrate, effectively generating and propagating the prebuilt cracks. The strain sensor integrated into firefighting gloves detected detailed finger angles and cyclic finger motions, demonstrating its capability for subtle human motion monitoring. It is also noteworthy that this novel strategy is a very quick, straightforward, and scalable method of fabricating strain sensors, which is extremely beneficial for practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile-Based Sensors: E-textiles, Devices, and Integrated Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Inductive Textile Sensor Design and Validation for a Wearable Monitoring Device
Sensors 2021, 21(1), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21010225 - 01 Jan 2021
Viewed by 699
Abstract
Textile sensors have gained attention for wearable devices, in which the most popular are the resistive textile sensor. However, these sensors present high hysteresis and a drift when stretched for long periods of time. Inductive textile sensors have been commonly used as antennas [...] Read more.
Textile sensors have gained attention for wearable devices, in which the most popular are the resistive textile sensor. However, these sensors present high hysteresis and a drift when stretched for long periods of time. Inductive textile sensors have been commonly used as antennas and plethysmographs, and their applications have been extended to measure heartbeat, wireless data transmission, and motion and gesture capturing systems. Inductive textile sensors have shown high reliability, stable readings, low production cost, and an easy manufacturing process. This paper presents the design and validation of an inductive strain textile sensor. The anthropometric dimensions of a healthy participant were used to define the maximum dimensions of the inductive textile sensor. The design of the inductive sensor was studied through theoretical calculations and simulations. Parameters such as height, width, area, perimeter, and number of complete loops were considered to calculate and evaluate the inductance value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textile-Based Sensors: E-textiles, Devices, and Integrated Systems)
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