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Special Issue "Sensors for IoT"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Internet of Things".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Elfed Lewis
Website
Guest Editor
Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre (OFSRC), University of Limerick, Limerick V94 T9PX, Ireland
Interests: optical fibre sensors; medical sensors; optical fibre instrumentation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to solicit advances in the fundamental research, development of new and existing technologies, and innovative industrial applications of sensors for “Internet of Things” (IoT).  Ranging from on-body bio-sensors, to instrumented smart homes, to sensor systems for industrial use and manufacturing, to area-wide networks of environmental sensors, sensors and sensor systems are at the core of all IoT-based activities. The data generated from sensors is an essential building block in IoT for driving the decisions and actions that create value and that enable new capabilities.  The Special Issue will specifically address the requirements, development, implementation, and operations of sensors and sensor systems. Contributions that cover any sensor technologies that are applicable to IoT are welcome. Reviews must offer a critical overview of the state-of-the-art on fundamentals, technologies, and applications pertinent to sensors for IoT.

Topic areas include, but are not limited to, are the following:

  • Agriculture
  • Automotive and transportation
  • Healthcare, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices
  • Industrial IoT
  • Maritime IoT
  • Smart cities and public safety

Prof. Dr. Elfed Lewis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Smart Sensor Architectures for Multimedia Sensing in IoMT
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051400 - 04 Mar 2020
Abstract
Today, a wide range of developments and paradigms require the use of embedded systems characterized by restrictions on their computing capacity, consumption, cost, and network connection. The evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT) towards Industrial IoT (IIoT) or the Internet of Multimedia [...] Read more.
Today, a wide range of developments and paradigms require the use of embedded systems characterized by restrictions on their computing capacity, consumption, cost, and network connection. The evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT) towards Industrial IoT (IIoT) or the Internet of Multimedia Things (IoMT), its impact within the 4.0 industry, the evolution of cloud computing towards edge or fog computing, also called near-sensor computing, or the increase in the use of embedded vision, are current examples of this trend. One of the most common methods of reducing energy consumption is the use of processor frequency scaling, based on a particular policy. The algorithms to define this policy are intended to obtain good responses to the workloads that occur in smarthphones. There has been no study that allows a correct definition of these algorithms for workloads such as those expected in the above scenarios. This paper presents a method to determine the operating parameters of the dynamic governor algorithm called Interactive, which offers significant improvements in power consumption, without reducing the performance of the application. These improvements depend on the load that the system has to support, so the results are evaluated against three different loads, from higher to lower, showing improvements ranging from 62% to 26%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for IoT)
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Open AccessArticle
Designing Laboratory for IoT Communication Infrastructure Environment for Remote Maritime Surveillance in Equatorial Areas Based on the Gulf of Guinea Field Experiences
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1349; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051349 - 29 Feb 2020
Abstract
The steady increase of the world population and economy leads to an increase in both types and amounts of goods transported over seas, which further inevitably leads to an increase of criminal activities in the maritime arena. In order to stifle criminal activities [...] Read more.
The steady increase of the world population and economy leads to an increase in both types and amounts of goods transported over seas, which further inevitably leads to an increase of criminal activities in the maritime arena. In order to stifle criminal activities nations are forced to develop sophisticated sensor networks. The backbone of any sensor network is a communication network which connects all sensors with the command centers, most often located hundreds of kilometers away from the sensors. In developing countries, communication networks are very often poorly developed, leaving only satellite links as somewhat reliable means of communication. Henceforth, in this paper, a laboratory for the Internet of Things (IoT) communication infrastructure environment designed to facilitate maritime sensor network design process in areas where communication network is dependent on data transfer over satellite links is presented. In order to successfully describe and develop a laboratory for IoT communication infrastructure environment, necessary data are collected during the design and deployment of a maritime surveillance network in the Gulf of Guinea. The main advantage of the proposed laboratory environment is the inclusion of satellite link simulation in the IoT laboratory environment. This feature provides an opportunity to cover a much broader scope of IoT solutions compared to other IoT laboratories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for IoT)
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Open AccessArticle
Analog Least Mean Square Loop for Self-Interference Cancellation: A Practical Perspective
Sensors 2020, 20(1), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20010270 - 03 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Self-interference (SI) is the key issue that prevents in-band full-duplex (IBFD) communications from being practical. Analog multi-tap adaptive filter is an efficient structure to cancel SI since it can capture the nonlinear components and noise in the transmitted signal. Analog least mean square [...] Read more.
Self-interference (SI) is the key issue that prevents in-band full-duplex (IBFD) communications from being practical. Analog multi-tap adaptive filter is an efficient structure to cancel SI since it can capture the nonlinear components and noise in the transmitted signal. Analog least mean square (ALMS) loop is a simple adaptive filter that can be implemented by purely analog means to sufficiently mitigate SI. Comprehensive analyses on the behaviors of the ALMS loop have been published in the literature. This paper proposes a practical structure and presents an implementation of the ALMS loop. By employing off-the-shelf components, a prototype of the ALMS loop including two taps is implemented for an IBFD system operating at the carrier frequency of 2.4 GHz. The prototype is firstly evaluated in a single carrier signaling IBFD system with 20 MHz and 50 MHz bandwidths, respectively. Measured results show that the ALMS loop can provide 39 dB and 33 dB of SI cancellation in the radio frequency domain for the two bandwidths, respectively. Furthermore, the impact of the roll-off factor of the pulse shaping filter on the SI cancellation level provided by the prototype is presented. Finally, the experiment with multicarrier signaling shows that the performance of the ALMS loop is the same as that in the single carrier system. These experimental results validate the theoretical analyses presented in our previous publications on the ALMS loop behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for IoT)
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Open AccessArticle
A Vibration Energy Harvester and Power Management Solution for Battery-Free Operation of Wireless Sensor Nodes
Sensors 2019, 19(17), 3776; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19173776 - 31 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Electromagnetic Vibration Energy Harvesting (EM-VEH) is an attractive alternative to batteries as a power source for wireless sensor nodes that enable intelligence at the edge of the Internet of Things (IoT). Industrial environments in particular offer an abundance of available kinetic energy, in [...] Read more.
Electromagnetic Vibration Energy Harvesting (EM-VEH) is an attractive alternative to batteries as a power source for wireless sensor nodes that enable intelligence at the edge of the Internet of Things (IoT). Industrial environments in particular offer an abundance of available kinetic energy, in the form of machinery vibrations that can be converted into electrical power through energy harvesting techniques. These ambient vibrations are generally broadband, and multi-modal harvesting configurations can be exploited to improve the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion. However, the additional challenge of energy conditioning (AC-to-DC conversion) to make the harvested energy useful brings into question what specific type of performance is to be expected in a real industrial application. This paper reports the operation of two practical IoT sensor nodes, continuously powered by the vibrations of a standard industrial compressor, using a multi-modal EM-VEH device, integrated with customised power management. The results show that the device and the power management circuit provide sufficient energy to receive and transmit data at intervals of less than one minute with an overall efficiency of about 30%. Descriptions of the system, test-bench, and the measured outcomes are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for IoT)
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Open AccessArticle
Wavelet-Based Analysis of Physical Activity and Sleep Movement Data from Wearable Sensors among Obese Adults
Sensors 2019, 19(17), 3710; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19173710 - 27 Aug 2019
Abstract
Decreased physical activity in obese individuals is associated with a prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Physicians usually recommend that obese individuals change their lifestyle, specifically changes in diet, exercise, and other physical activities for obesity management. Therefore, understanding physical activity and sleep [...] Read more.
Decreased physical activity in obese individuals is associated with a prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Physicians usually recommend that obese individuals change their lifestyle, specifically changes in diet, exercise, and other physical activities for obesity management. Therefore, understanding physical activity and sleep behavior is an essential aspect of obesity management. With innovations in mobile and electronic health care technologies, wearable inertial sensors have been used extensively over the past decade for monitoring human activities. Despite significant progress with the wearable inertial sensing technology, there is a knowledge gap among researchers regarding how to analyze longitudinal multi-day inertial sensor data to explore activities of daily living (ADL) and sleep behavior. The purpose of this study was to explore new clinically relevant metrics using movement amplitude and frequency from longitudinal wearable sensor data in obese and non-obese young adults. We utilized wavelet analysis to determine movement frequencies on longitudinal multi-day wearable sensor data. In this study, we recruited 10 obese and 10 non-obese young subjects. We found that obese participants performed more low-frequency (0.1 Hz) movements and fewer movements of high frequency (1.1–1.4 Hz) compared to non-obese counterparts. Both obese and non-obese subjects were active during the 00:00–06:00 time interval. In addition, obesity affected sleep with significantly fewer transitions, and obese individuals showed low values of root mean square transition accelerations throughout the night. This study is critical for obesity management to prevent unhealthy weight gain by the recommendations of physical activity based on our results. Longitudinal multi-day monitoring using wearable sensors has great potential to be integrated into routine health care checkups to prevent obesity and promote physical activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for IoT)
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