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Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Advanced Sensing and Imaging Technologies

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensing and Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4770

Special Issue Editors

Laser Biomedical Research Center, G. R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Interests: label-free cellular and tissue imaging; turbidity suppression imaging; optical coherence tomography; quantitative phase imaging; optofluidics
Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW, UK
Interests: polarization imaging; electromagnetic theory; whispering gallery mode resonators; plasmonic sensing; disordered media; information theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensing and imaging technologies are pervasive in many scientific fields and applications since they enable us to measure and view the world around us at scales ranging from the nanoscopic to the astronomical. Rapid advances in terms of sensitivity, resolution, speed, and signal processing are allowing ever more complex problems and challenges, such as study of dynamic biological processes, single molecule sensing, imaging in scattering and in-vivo environments and remote environmental monitoring, to be approached.

This Special Issue, organized by invited members of the editorial board of the Sensing and Imaging section, will collect together the latest scientific achievements in advanced sensing and imaging technologies and their applications. We cordially invite contributors to submit original research articles, and reviews on all aspects of these fields. This includes, but is not limited to, novel sensing platforms or imaging instruments, bio- and physical sensors, imaging in scattering media, superresolution, multimodal or computational imaging methods and associated machine learning algorithms.

Dr. Zahid Yaqoob
Dr. Matthew Foreman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3293 KiB  
Article
Live Cell Imaging by Single-Shot Common-Path Wide Field-of-View Reflective Digital Holographic Microscope
Sensors 2024, 24(3), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24030720 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 405
Abstract
Quantitative phase imaging by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a nondestructive and label-free technique that has been playing an indispensable role in the fields of science, technology, and biomedical imaging. The technique is competent in imaging and analyzing label-free living cells and investigating [...] Read more.
Quantitative phase imaging by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a nondestructive and label-free technique that has been playing an indispensable role in the fields of science, technology, and biomedical imaging. The technique is competent in imaging and analyzing label-free living cells and investigating reflective surfaces. Herein, we introduce a new configuration of a wide field-of-view single-shot common-path off-axis reflective DHM for the quantitative phase imaging of biological cells that leverages several advantages, including being less-vibration sensitive to external perturbations due to its common-path configuration, also being compact in size, simple in optical design, highly stable, and cost-effective. A detailed description of the proposed DHM system, including its optical design, working principle, and capability for phase imaging, is presented. The applications of the proposed system are demonstrated through quantitative phase imaging results obtained from the reflective surface (USAF resolution test target) as well as transparent samples (living plant cells). The proposed system could find its applications in the investigation of several biological specimens and the optical metrology of micro-surfaces. Full article
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12 pages, 3108 KiB  
Article
Deep Learning Approach for the Localization and Analysis of Surface Plasmon Scattering
Sensors 2023, 23(19), 8100; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23198100 - 27 Sep 2023
Viewed by 652
Abstract
Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) combines the principles of traditional microscopy with the versatility of surface plasmons to develop label-free imaging methods. This paper describes a proof-of-principles approach based on deep learning that utilized the Y-Net convolutional neural network model to improve the [...] Read more.
Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) combines the principles of traditional microscopy with the versatility of surface plasmons to develop label-free imaging methods. This paper describes a proof-of-principles approach based on deep learning that utilized the Y-Net convolutional neural network model to improve the detection and analysis methodology of SPRM. A machine-learning based image analysis technique was used to provide a method for the one-shot analysis of SPRM images to estimate scattering parameters such as the scatterer location. The method was assessed by applying the approach to SPRM images and reconstructing an image from the network output for comparison with the original image. The results showed that deep learning can localize scatterers and predict other variables of scattering objects with high accuracy in a noisy environment. The results also confirmed that with a larger field of view, deep learning can be used to improve traditional SPRM such that it localizes and produces scatterer characteristics in one shot, considerably increasing the detection capabilities of SPRM. Full article
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14 pages, 3656 KiB  
Article
“Grafting-To” Covalent Binding of Plasmonic Nanoparticles onto Silica WGM Microresonators: Mechanically Robust Single-Molecule Sensors and Determination of Activation Energies from Single-Particle Events
Sensors 2023, 23(7), 3455; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23073455 - 25 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1156
Abstract
We hereby present a novel “grafting-to”-like approach for the covalent attachment of plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) onto whispering gallery mode (WGM) silica microresonators. Mechanically stable optoplasmonic microresonators were employed for sensing single-particle and single-molecule interactions in real time, allowing for the differentiation between binding [...] Read more.
We hereby present a novel “grafting-to”-like approach for the covalent attachment of plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) onto whispering gallery mode (WGM) silica microresonators. Mechanically stable optoplasmonic microresonators were employed for sensing single-particle and single-molecule interactions in real time, allowing for the differentiation between binding and non-binding events. An approximated value of the activation energy for the silanization reaction occurring during the “grafting-to” approach was obtained using the Arrhenius equation; the results agree with available values from both bulk experiments and ab initio calculations. The “grafting-to” method combined with the functionalization of the plasmonic nanoparticle with appropriate receptors, such as single-stranded DNA, provides a robust platform for probing specific single-molecule interactions under biologically relevant conditions. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 1996 KiB  
Review
Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy: A Review of Recent Advances in Parallelisation and Depth Discrimination Techniques
Sensors 2023, 23(23), 9338; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23239338 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 785
Abstract
Diffuse correlation spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical modality used to measure cerebral blood flow in real time, and it has important potential applications in clinical monitoring and neuroscience. As such, many research groups have recently been investigating methods to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, [...] Read more.
Diffuse correlation spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical modality used to measure cerebral blood flow in real time, and it has important potential applications in clinical monitoring and neuroscience. As such, many research groups have recently been investigating methods to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, and spatial resolution of diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Such methods have included multispeckle, long wavelength, interferometric, depth discrimination, time-of-flight resolution, and acousto-optic detection strategies. In this review, we exhaustively appraise this plethora of recent advances, which can be used to assess limitations and guide innovation for future implementations of diffuse correlation spectroscopy that will harness technological improvements in the years to come. Full article
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Other

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14 pages, 3427 KiB  
Perspective
Chewing Analysis by Means of Electromagnetic Articulography: Current Developments and New Possibilities
Sensors 2023, 23(23), 9511; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23239511 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 579
Abstract
Chewing is a complex procedure that involves sensory feedback and motor impulses controlled by the trigeminal system in the brainstem. The analysis of mandibular movement is a first approximation to understanding these mechanisms. Several recording methods have been tested to achieve this. Video, [...] Read more.
Chewing is a complex procedure that involves sensory feedback and motor impulses controlled by the trigeminal system in the brainstem. The analysis of mandibular movement is a first approximation to understanding these mechanisms. Several recording methods have been tested to achieve this. Video, ultrasound, the use of external markers and kinesiographs are examples of recording systems used in research. Electromagnetic articulography is an alternative method to those previously mentioned. It consists of the use of electromagnetic fields and receiver coils. The receiver coils are placed on the points of interest and the 3D coordinates of movement are saved in binary files. In the Oral Physiology Laboratory of the Dental Sciences Research Center (Centro de Investigación en Ciencias Odontológicas—CICO), in the Faculty of Dentistry at the Universidad de La Frontera (Temuco, Chile) several research studies have been carried out using the AG501 3D EMA articulograph (Carstens Medizinelektronik, Lenglern, Germany). With this device, they developed a series of protocols to record mandibular movement and obtain new information, such as the 3D Posselt polygon, the area of each polygon, individualized masticatory cycles and speed and acceleration profiles. Other investigations have analyzed these parameters, but separately. The AG501 allows for holistic analysis of all these data without altering natural movement. A limitation of this technology is the interference generated by its metallic elements. The aim of the present work is to show the developed methods used to record mandibular movement in the CICO, using the AG501 and compare them with others used in several research studies. Full article
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6 pages, 1620 KiB  
Brief Report
Automatic Alignment Method for Controlled Free-Space Excitation of Whispering-Gallery Resonances
Sensors 2023, 23(21), 9007; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23219007 - 06 Nov 2023
Viewed by 511
Abstract
Whispering-gallery mode microresonators have gained wide popularity as experimental platforms for different applications, ranging from biosensing to nonlinear optics. Typically, the resonant modes of dielectric microresonators are stimulated via evanescent wave coupling, facilitated using tapered optical fibers or coupling prisms. However, this method [...] Read more.
Whispering-gallery mode microresonators have gained wide popularity as experimental platforms for different applications, ranging from biosensing to nonlinear optics. Typically, the resonant modes of dielectric microresonators are stimulated via evanescent wave coupling, facilitated using tapered optical fibers or coupling prisms. However, this method poses serious shortcomings due to fabrication and access-related limitations, which could be elegantly overcome by implementing a free-space coupling approach; although additional alignment procedures are needed in this case. To address this issue, we have developed a new algorithm to excite the microresonator automatically. Here, we show the working mechanism and the preliminary results of our experimental method applied to a home-made silica microsphere, using a visible laser beam with a spatial light modulator and a software control. Full article
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