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Special Issue "Advances in Metamaterials or Plasmonics-Based Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Shinpei Ogawa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Advanced Technology R&D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Tokoy, Japan
Interests: plasmonics; metamaterials; graphene; 2D materials; IR sensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Masafumi Kimata
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan
Interests: uncooled (thermal) infrared detectors; Type-II superlattice infrared detectors; infrared detectors; MEMS technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

The fields of metamaterials and plasmonics have seen significant advances for both fundamental scientific understanding and applications. Metamaterials are artificially engineered structures and can realize new functions that cannot be obtained in nature, while plasmonics can manipulate electromagnetic waves beyond the diffraction limit. These technologies are combined primarily at optical wavelengths to produce unique properties that cannot be achieved by conventional technologies. In particular, various types of high-performance or new functional sensors such as optical, biological, medical, gas, and chemical sensors based on metamaterials and plasmonics have been proposed. This special issue aims to introduce a wide range of recent advances in the metamaterials- and/or plasmonics-based sensor applications as well as related fundamental studies such as those on 2D material-based metamaterials or plasmonics for sensor applications.

We hope that this special issue will inspire both academic and industrial communities to take advantage of these technologies and will stimulate the development of next-generation sensor products.

Dr. Shinpei Ogawa

Dr. Masafumi Kimata
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metamaterials
  • Metasurfaces
  • Plasmonics
  • Sensors
  • Graphene
  • 2D materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessCommunication
Frequency-Tunable Terahertz Plasmonic Structure Based on the Solid Immersed Method for Sensing
Sensors 2021, 21(4), 1419; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041419 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Terahertz waves are located in the frequency band between radio waves and light, and they are being considered for various applications as a light source. Generally, the use of light requires focusing; however, when a terahertz wave is irradiated onto a small detector [...] Read more.
Terahertz waves are located in the frequency band between radio waves and light, and they are being considered for various applications as a light source. Generally, the use of light requires focusing; however, when a terahertz wave is irradiated onto a small detector or a small measurement sample, its wavelength, which is much longer than that of visible light, causes problems. The diffraction limit may make it impossible to focus the terahertz light down to the desired range by using common lenses. The Bull’s Eye structure, which is a plasmonic structure, is a promising tool for focusing the terahertz light beyond the diffraction limit and into the sub-wavelength region. By utilizing the surface plasmon propagation, the electric field intensity and transmission coefficient can be enhanced. In this study, we improved the electric field intensity and light focusing in a small region by adapting the solid immersion method (SIM) from our previous study, which had a frequency-tunable nonconcentric Bull’s Eye structure. Through electromagnetic field analysis, the electric field intensity was confirmed to be approximately 20 times higher than that of the case without the SIM, and the transmission measurements confirmed that the transmission through an aperture had a gap of 1/20 that of the wavelength. This fabricated device can be used in imaging and sensing applications because of the close contact between the transmission aperture and the measurement sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metamaterials or Plasmonics-Based Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Graphene Plasmonics in Sensor Applications: A Review
Sensors 2020, 20(12), 3563; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20123563 - 23 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1318
Abstract
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated in graphene at frequencies in the mid-infrared to terahertz range, which is not possible using conventional plasmonic materials such as noble metals. Moreover, the lifetime and confinement volume of such SPPs are much longer and smaller, [...] Read more.
Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated in graphene at frequencies in the mid-infrared to terahertz range, which is not possible using conventional plasmonic materials such as noble metals. Moreover, the lifetime and confinement volume of such SPPs are much longer and smaller, respectively, than those in metals. For these reasons, graphene plasmonics has potential applications in novel plasmonic sensors and various concepts have been proposed. This review paper examines the potential of such graphene plasmonics with regard to the development of novel high-performance sensors. The theoretical background is summarized and the intrinsic nature of graphene plasmons, interactions between graphene and SPPs induced by metallic nanostructures and the electrical control of SPPs by adjusting the Fermi level of graphene are discussed. Subsequently, the development of optical sensors, biological sensors and important components such as absorbers/emitters and reconfigurable optical mirrors for use in new sensor systems are reviewed. Finally, future challenges related to the fabrication of graphene-based devices as well as various advanced optical devices incorporating other two-dimensional materials are examined. This review is intended to assist researchers in both industry and academia in the design and development of novel sensors based on graphene plasmonics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metamaterials or Plasmonics-Based Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Microscopic Study on Excitation and Emission Enhancement by the Plasmon Mode on a Plasmonic Chip
Sensors 2020, 20(22), 6415; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20226415 - 10 Nov 2020
Viewed by 447
Abstract
Excitation and emission enhancement by using the plasmon mode formed on a plasmonic chip was studied with a microscope and micro-spectroscope. Surface plasmon resonance wavelengths were observed on one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) plasmonic chips by measuring reflection and transmission spectra, and they [...] Read more.
Excitation and emission enhancement by using the plasmon mode formed on a plasmonic chip was studied with a microscope and micro-spectroscope. Surface plasmon resonance wavelengths were observed on one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) plasmonic chips by measuring reflection and transmission spectra, and they were assigned to the plasmon modes predicted by the theoretical resonance wavelengths. The excitation and emission enhancements were evaluated using the fluorescence intensity of yellow–green fluorescence particles. The 2D grating had plasmon modes of kgx45(2) (diagonal direction with m = 2) in addition to the fundamental mode of kgx(1) (direction of a square one side) in the visible range. In epifluorescence detection, the excitation enhancement factors of kgx(2) on the 1D and 2D chips were found to be 1.3–1.4, and the emission enhancement factor of kgx45(2) on the 2D chip was 1.5–1.8, although the emission enhancement was not found on the 1D chip. Moreover, enhancement factors for the other fluorophores were also studied. The emission enhancement factor of kgx(1) was shown to depend on the fluorescence quantum yield. The emission enhancement of 2D was 1.3-fold larger than that of 1D considering all azimuth components, and the 2D pattern was shown to be advantageous for bright fluorescence microscopic observation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metamaterials or Plasmonics-Based Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Scalable and High-Throughput Top-Down Manufacturing of Optical Metasurfaces
Sensors 2020, 20(15), 4108; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154108 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Metasurfaces have shown promising potential to miniaturize existing bulk optical components thanks to their extraordinary optical properties and ultra-thin, small, and lightweight footprints. However, the absence of proper manufacturing methods has been one of the main obstacles preventing the practical application of metasurfaces [...] Read more.
Metasurfaces have shown promising potential to miniaturize existing bulk optical components thanks to their extraordinary optical properties and ultra-thin, small, and lightweight footprints. However, the absence of proper manufacturing methods has been one of the main obstacles preventing the practical application of metasurfaces and commercialization. Although a variety of fabrication techniques have been used to produce optical metasurfaces, there are still no universal scalable and high-throughput manufacturing methods that meet the criteria for large-scale metasurfaces for device/product-level applications. The fundamentals and recent progress of the large area and high-throughput manufacturing methods are discussed with practical device applications. We systematically classify various top-down scalable patterning techniques for optical metasurfaces: firstly, optical and printing methods are categorized and then their conventional and unconventional (emerging/new) techniques are discussed in detail, respectively. In the end of each section, we also introduce the recent developments of metasurfaces realized by the corresponding fabrication methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metamaterials or Plasmonics-Based Sensors)
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