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Special Issue "I3S 2015 Selected Papers"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hans Peter Lang

University of Basel, Institute of Physics, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: ++41612673769
Interests: cantilever sensors; cantilever array sensors; nanomechanical cantilever arrays; membrane surface stress sensors; biosensors; chemical sensors; beam-deflection; piezoresistive sensors; biochemical sensing; exhaled breath sensing

Special Issue Information

The 4th edition of the International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S) will be held from 13th to 15th July 2015 in Basel, Switzerland under the patronage of University of Basel. It will comprise 5 plenary sessions and one afternoon with three parallel topical sessions that will cover the most exciting aspects of sensor science (see below for a list of topics). A conference dinner will take place on the second evening of the conference.

Confirmed Speakers
Session 1: Sensors Breakthrough

Christof Fattinger, Roche Innovation Center, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. Basel, Switzerland
Vladimir Mirsky, Faculty of Natural Sciences / Nanobiotechnology, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Senftenberg, Germany
Patricia A. Broderick, The Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, The City College of New York, and NYU Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center NY, New York, NY, USA
Evgeny Katz, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA

Session 2: Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

W. Rudolf Seitz, Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, USA
Alex Star, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Huangxian Ju, State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P.R.China
Spas Kolev, School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Session 3: Extreme Sensing

Debbie Senesky, Stanford XLab, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
Adrian M. Ionescu, NANOLAB, EPFL STI IEL, Lausanne, Switzerland

Session 4: Single Chip Sensors

Andrew J. deMello, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Christian Schönenberger, Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

Session 5.1: Photonic Sensing

Christian Pedersen, Institut for Fotonik, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Roskilde, Danmark
Vittorio Passaro, Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Politecnico di Bari, Bari, Italy
Markus Sigrist, Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Session 6: Sensor Networks

Patrick Thomas Eugster, Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

last update: 2 October 2014

Keywords

  • sensors sreakthrough
  • biosensors and chemical sensors
  • extreme sensing
  • single chip sensors
  • photonic sensing
  • remote and micropower sensors
  • neurosensors
  • sensor networks

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Delay/Disruption Tolerant Network-Based Message Forwarding for a River Pollution Monitoring Wireless Sensor Network Application
Sensors 2016, 16(4), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16040436
Received: 16 December 2015 / Revised: 14 March 2016 / Accepted: 21 March 2016 / Published: 25 March 2016
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (2317 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Communications from remote areas that may be of interest is still a problem. Many innovative projects applied to remote sites face communications difficulties. The GOLDFISH project was an EU-funded project for river pollution monitoring in developing countries. It had several sensor clusters, with [...] Read more.
Communications from remote areas that may be of interest is still a problem. Many innovative projects applied to remote sites face communications difficulties. The GOLDFISH project was an EU-funded project for river pollution monitoring in developing countries. It had several sensor clusters, with floating WiFi antennas, deployed along a downstream river’s course. Sensor clusters sent messages to a Gateway installed on the riverbank. This gateway sent the messages, through a backhaul technology, to an Internet server where data was aggregated over a map. The communication challenge in this scenario was produced by the antennas’ movement and network backhaul availability. Since the antennas were floating on the river, communications could be disrupted at any time. Also, 2G/3G availability near the river was not constant. For non-real-time applications, we propose a Delay/Disruption Tolerant Network (DTN)-based solution where all nodes have persistent storage capabilities and DTN protocols to be able to wait minutes or hours to transmit. A mechanical backhaul will periodically visit the river bank where the gateway is installed and it will automatically collect sensor data to be carried to an Internet-covered spot. The proposed forwarding protocol delivers around 98% of the messages for this scenario, performing better than other well-known DTN routing protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue I3S 2015 Selected Papers)
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Open AccessArticle Investigation of the Performance of HEMT-Based NO, NO2 and NH3 Exhaust Gas Sensors for Automotive Antipollution Systems
Sensors 2016, 16(3), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16030273
Received: 31 December 2015 / Revised: 9 February 2016 / Accepted: 18 February 2016 / Published: 23 February 2016
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (15158 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We report improved sensitivity to NO, NO2 and NH3 gas with specially-designed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) that are suitable for operation in the harsh environment of diesel exhaust systems. The gate of the HEMT device is functionalized using a [...] Read more.
We report improved sensitivity to NO, NO2 and NH3 gas with specially-designed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) that are suitable for operation in the harsh environment of diesel exhaust systems. The gate of the HEMT device is functionalized using a Pt catalyst for gas detection. We found that the performance of the sensors is enhanced at a temperature of 600 °C, and the measured sensitivity to 900 ppm-NO, 900 ppm-NO2 and 15 ppm-NH3 is 24%, 38.5% and 33%, respectively, at 600 °C. We also report dynamic response times as fast as 1 s for these three gases. Together, these results indicate that HEMT sensors could be used in a harsh environment with the ability to control an anti-pollution system in real time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue I3S 2015 Selected Papers)
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Open AccessArticle A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials
Sensors 2016, 16(2), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16020191
Received: 2 November 2015 / Revised: 20 January 2016 / Accepted: 29 January 2016 / Published: 4 February 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (2440 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of [...] Read more.
Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue I3S 2015 Selected Papers)
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Open AccessConference Report 4th International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S2015): Conference Report
Sensors 2015, 15(9), 24458-24465; https://doi.org/10.3390/s150924458
Received: 2 September 2015 / Accepted: 15 September 2015 / Published: 23 September 2015
PDF Full-text (214 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An international scientific conference was sponsored by the journal Sensors under the patronage of the University of Basel. The 4th edition of the International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S2015) ran from 13 to 15 July 2015 in Basel, Switzerland. It comprised five plenary [...] Read more.
An international scientific conference was sponsored by the journal Sensors under the patronage of the University of Basel. The 4th edition of the International Symposium on Sensor Science (I3S2015) ran from 13 to 15 July 2015 in Basel, Switzerland. It comprised five plenary sessions and one morning with three parallel sessions. The conference covered the most exciting aspects and the latest developments in sensor science. The conference dinner took place on the second evening of the conference. The I3S2015 brought together 170 participants from 40 different countries. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue I3S 2015 Selected Papers)
Sensors EISSN 1424-8220 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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