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Special Issue "Design and Applications of Magnetic Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2021) | Viewed by 4421

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Seoksoo Yoon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Department, Andong Natuional University, 1375 Gyeongdong-Ro, Andong, GyeongSangBuk-Do, 36729, Korea
Interests: magnetic sensors; geomangetic sensors; magnetic biosensors; signal conditioning circuits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent R&D on magnetic sensors has opened up a new application area of biomedicine and vital signal monitoring. As for performing these applications, the enhancement of sensor sensitivity is a crucial factor, which has been improved mostly through the development of materials like magnetoresistance (MR) effects in magnetic multilayers, and electronic and measurement technologies for the noise reduction and effective signal acquisition. Herein, magnetic sensors successfully demonstrate the molecular diagnosis with the help of magnetic particle labels, and biomagnetic signal detection from human organs. Here, these technology demonstrations indicated that biosensing sub-systems/systems with MR sensors were validated in operational environments, in addition to SQUID system.

This Special Issue aims at bringing together contributions from researchers and engineers who could greatly benefit from these biomedical applications and advanced sensors technologies. The focus is on the latest developments and applications of magnetic sensors on magnetic biochip and sensing systems for vital signal monitoring of organs. Papers devoted to overviews of the evolution of biomagnetism advanced sensor technologies are also welcome in original and review article format.

Prof. CheolGi Kim
Prof. Seoksoo Yoon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced integrated electronics
  • biomagnetism
  • biochip
  • biomedicine
  • cardiovascular signal
  • electromagnetic vital signals
  • flexible sensor
  • high resolution sensor
  • magnetocardiography
  • neuro-signals
  • magnetic sensors
  • biomangetic sensor
  • biosensor
  • vital signal monitoring
  • magnetoresistance
  • SQUID

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Operational Parameters for Sub-Nano Tesla Field Resolution of PHMR Sensors in Harsh Environments
Sensors 2021, 21(20), 6891; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21206891 - 18 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 832
Abstract
The resolution of planar-Hall magnetoresistive (PHMR) sensors was investigated in the frequency range from 0.5 Hz to 200 Hz in terms of its sensitivity, average noise level, and detectivity. Analysis of the sensor sensitivity and voltage noise response was performed by varying operational [...] Read more.
The resolution of planar-Hall magnetoresistive (PHMR) sensors was investigated in the frequency range from 0.5 Hz to 200 Hz in terms of its sensitivity, average noise level, and detectivity. Analysis of the sensor sensitivity and voltage noise response was performed by varying operational parameters such as sensor geometrical architectures, sensor configurations, sensing currents, and temperature. All the measurements of PHMR sensors were carried out under both constant current (CC) and constant voltage (CV) modes. In the present study, Barkhausen noise was revealed in 1/f noise component and found less significant in the PHMR sensor configuration. Under measured noise spectral density at optimized conditions, the best magnetic field detectivity was achieved better than 550 pT/√Hz at 100 Hz and close to 1.1 nT/√Hz at 10 Hz for a tri-layer multi-ring PHMR sensor in an unshielded environment. Furthermore, the promising feasibility and possible routes for further improvement of the sensor resolution are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Magnetic Sensors)
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Article
Clusters of Spin Valve Sensors in 3D Magnetic Field of a Label
Sensors 2021, 21(11), 3595; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21113595 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 668
Abstract
Magnetic field sensors based on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect have a number of practical current and future applications. We report on a modeling of the magnetoresistive response of moving spin-valve (SV) GMR sensors combined in certain cluster networks to an inhomogeneous magnetic [...] Read more.
Magnetic field sensors based on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect have a number of practical current and future applications. We report on a modeling of the magnetoresistive response of moving spin-valve (SV) GMR sensors combined in certain cluster networks to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a label. We predicted a large variety of sensor responses dependent on the number of sensors in the cluster, their types of interconnections, the orientation of the cluster, and the trajectory of sensor motion relative to the label. The model included a specific shape of the label, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The results can be used for the optimal design of positioning devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Magnetic Sensors)
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Communication
Bridge Resistance Compensation for Noise Reduction in a Self-Balanced PHMR Sensor
Sensors 2021, 21(11), 3585; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21113585 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1255
Abstract
Advanced microelectromechanical system (MEMS) magnetic field sensor applications demand ultra-high detectivity down to the low magnetic fields. To enhance the detection limit of the magnetic sensor, a resistance compensator integrated self-balanced bridge type sensor was devised for low-frequency noise reduction in the frequency [...] Read more.
Advanced microelectromechanical system (MEMS) magnetic field sensor applications demand ultra-high detectivity down to the low magnetic fields. To enhance the detection limit of the magnetic sensor, a resistance compensator integrated self-balanced bridge type sensor was devised for low-frequency noise reduction in the frequency range of 0.5 Hz to 200 Hz. The self-balanced bridge sensor was a NiFe (10 nm)/IrMn (10 nm) bilayer structure in the framework of planar Hall magnetoresistance (PHMR) technology. The proposed resistance compensator integrated with a self-bridge sensor architecture presented a compact and cheaper alternative to marketable MEMS MR sensors, adjusting the offset voltage compensation at the wafer level, and led to substantial improvement in the sensor noise level. Moreover, the sensor noise components of electronic and magnetic origin were identified by measuring the sensor noise spectral density as a function of temperature and operating power. The lowest achievable noise in this device architecture was estimated at ~3.34 nV/Hz at 100 Hz. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Magnetic Sensors)
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Letter
Characterization and Miniaturization of Silver-Nanoparticle Microcoil via Aerosol Jet Printing Techniques for Micromagnetic Cochlear Stimulation
Sensors 2020, 20(21), 6087; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216087 - 26 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1150
Abstract
According to the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders 2012 report, the number of cochlear implant (CI) users is steadily increasing from 324,000 CI users worldwide. The cochlea, located in the inner ear, is a snail-like structure that exhibits a tonotopic [...] Read more.
According to the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders 2012 report, the number of cochlear implant (CI) users is steadily increasing from 324,000 CI users worldwide. The cochlea, located in the inner ear, is a snail-like structure that exhibits a tonotopic geometry where acoustic waves are filtered spatially according to frequency. Throughout the cochlea, there exist hair cells that transduce sensed acoustic waves into an electrical signal that is carried by the auditory nerve to ultimately reach the auditory cortex of the brain. A cochlear implant bridges the gap if non-functional hair cells are present. Conventional CIs directly inject an electrical current into surrounding tissue via an implanted electrode array and exploit the frequency-to-place mapping of the cochlea. However, the current is dispersed in perilymph, a conductive bodily fluid within the cochlea, causing a spread of excitation. Magnetic fields are more impervious to the effects of the cochlear environment due to the material properties of perilymph and surrounding tissue, demonstrating potential to improve precision. As an alternative to conventional CI electrodes, the development and miniaturization of microcoils intended for micromagnetic stimulation of intracochlear neural elements is described. As a step toward realizing a microcoil array sized for cochlear implantation, human-sized coils were prototyped via aerosol jet printing. The batch reproducible aerosol jet printed microcoils have a diameter of 1800 μm, trace width and trace spacing of 112.5 μm, 12 μm thickness, and inductance values of approximately 15.5 nH. Modelling results indicate that the coils have a combined depolarization–hyperpolarization region that spans 1.5 mm and produce a more restrictive spread of activation when compared with conventional CI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Applications of Magnetic Sensors)
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