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Special Issue "Biological In Vitro Models"

A special issue of Sci (ISSN 2413-4155).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021) | Viewed by 6311

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Eleonore Fröhlich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biological testing of medicines and environmental toxins traditionally begins with cell culture and continues with animal experiments, usually in small laboratory rodents. Animal studies, compared to conventional cell culture, have the advantage of more realistic exposure conditions and the ability to evaluate effects on more cell types and on their interaction. Animal experiments are considered the gold standard for biological testing.

Better knowledge of inter-species differences in physiology, particularly regarding the immune system; directives issued by authorities like the European Union to replace animal experimentation; and the development of more physiologically relevant cell culture models will change the currently used tiered testing strategies. It is expected that the role of in silico techniques and cellular models will increase in comparison to animal experiments.

This Special Issue invites submissions on the topic of cellular testing, including but not limited to the comparison between different in vitro models, correlation of in vitro and in vivo models, analytical tools for evaluation of cellular processes, and development of advanced (e.g. dynamic, 3D models, co-culture) in vitro models.

Prof. Eleonore Fröhlich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sci is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D culture systems
  • High throughput screening
  • In vitro cell differentiation
  • Long-term culture
  • Bioreactors
  • Co-culture systems
  • Organs on a chip
  • Tools for standardization
  • High content analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Introducing an Efficient In Vitro Cornea Mimetic Model for Testing Drug Permeability
Sci 2021, 3(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci3030030 - 22 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3167
Abstract
There is a growing need for novel in vitro corneal models to replace animal-based ex vivo tests in drug permeability studies. In this study, we demonstrated a corneal mimetic that models the stromal and epithelial compartments of the human cornea. Human corneal epithelial [...] Read more.
There is a growing need for novel in vitro corneal models to replace animal-based ex vivo tests in drug permeability studies. In this study, we demonstrated a corneal mimetic that models the stromal and epithelial compartments of the human cornea. Human corneal epithelial cells (HCE-T) were grown on top of a self-supporting porcine collagen-based hydrogel. Cross-sections of the multi-layers were characterized by histological staining and immunocytochemistry of zonula oc-cludens-1 protein (ZO-1) and occludin. Furthermore, water content and bssic elastic properties of the synthetized collagen type I-based hydrogels were measured. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values of a representative set of ophthalmic drugs were measured and correlated to rabbit cornea Papp values found in the literature. A multilayered structure of HCE-T cells and the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in the full thickness of the multilayer were observed. The hydrogel-based corneal model exhibited an excellent correlation to rabbit corneal permeability (r = 0.96), whereas the insert-grown HCE-T multilayer was more permeable and the correlation to the rabbit corneal permeability was lower (r = 0.89). The hydrogel-based human corneal model predicts the rabbit corneal permeability more reliably in comparison to HCE-T cells grown in inserts. This in vitro human corneal model can be successfully employed for drug permeability tests whilst avoiding ethical issues and reducing costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological In Vitro Models)
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Review

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Review
Replacement Strategies for Animal Studies in Inhalation Testing
Sci 2021, 3(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci3040045 - 01 Dec 2021
Viewed by 2141
Abstract
Animal testing is mandatory in drug testing and is the gold standard for toxicity and efficacy evaluations. This situation is expected to change in the future as the 3Rs principle, which stands for the replacement, reduction, and refinement of the use of animals [...] Read more.
Animal testing is mandatory in drug testing and is the gold standard for toxicity and efficacy evaluations. This situation is expected to change in the future as the 3Rs principle, which stands for the replacement, reduction, and refinement of the use of animals in science, is reinforced by many countries. On the other hand, technologies for alternatives to animal testing have increased. The need to develop and use alternatives depends on the complexity of the research topic and also on the extent to which the currently used animal models can mimic human physiology and/or exposure. The lung morphology and physiology of commonly used animal species differs from that of human lungs, and the realistic inhalation exposure of animals is challenging. In vitro and in silico methods can assess important aspects of the in vivo effects, namely particle deposition, dissolution, action at, and permeation through, the respiratory barrier, and pharmacokinetics. This review discusses the limitations of animal models and exposure systems and proposes in vitro and in silico techniques that could, when used together, reduce or even replace animal testing in inhalation testing in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological In Vitro Models)
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