Special Issue "Natural Resources Policy and Economics for Sustainable Development: Theory and Application"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stella Tsani
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Athens University of Economics and Business & International Centre for Research on the Environment and the Economy
Interests: econometric and statistical methods and methodology; computable general equilibrium models; institutions and the macroeconomy; macroeconomic policy; macroeconomic aspects of public finance; labor markets and informal economy; trade; microeconomic behavior; information, knowledge, and uncertainty; intertemporal firm choice: investment, capacity, and financing; prices, business fluctuations, and cycles; international relations, national security, and international political economy; sustainable development; renewable resources and conservation; exhaustible resources and economic development; energy demand and supply; environmental economics, valuation of environmental effects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than ever, the need to manage natural resources in a way that can adequately address the needs of current generations, while maintaining their capacity to provide for future generations, has become apparent. Sustainable development requires integrated approaches that address environmental, economic, technological, institutional, and social issues in an inter- and intra-disciplinary approach.  The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a ground for scientific publications of theoretical and empirical analyses on the topic of integrated sustainable management of natural resources, which address technology, institutional, societal, economic and environmental concerns. The goal is to bridge economic and policy areas of resource management for sustainable development through high-profile publications, to be used and referenced in academic and policy networks. The Special Issue welcomes scientific articles that adopt a multidisciplinary approach to the integrated assessment and management approaches to natural resources, over time and space. Studies linked to Sustainable Development Goals 6, 7, 9, 13, 14 and 16 are particularly welcomed. Topics of research can be situated within policy frameworks and initiatives at global and/or EU level linked to the sustainable management of natural resources.

Dr. Stella Tsani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development
  • energy
  • institutions
  • resource management
  • economic policy
  • ecosystems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Political Law on the Environment: The Authority of the Government and Local Government to File Litigation in Law Number 32 Year 2009 on Environmental Protection and Management
Resources 2018, 7(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7040077 - 23 Nov 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2488
Abstract
The construction of legal norms concerning the government’s right to file litigation for compensation in Article 90 paragraph (1) of Law No. 32 Year 2009 on Environmental Protection and Management (hereafter referred to as UUPPLH) is very important. However, Article 90 paragraph (1) [...] Read more.
The construction of legal norms concerning the government’s right to file litigation for compensation in Article 90 paragraph (1) of Law No. 32 Year 2009 on Environmental Protection and Management (hereafter referred to as UUPPLH) is very important. However, Article 90 paragraph (1) of UUPPLH raises legal problems in the form of obscurity of norms, regarding the basis that underlies government institutions’ and regional governments’ authority to file claims for compensation. The first hypothesis believes that most of the environmental problems are caused by the ineffectiveness of supervision by the government itself. This research focuses on studying the government’s right to file litigation as a law enforcement effort in the natural resources sector. The method used in this research is normative juridical, which comprehensively assesses the norms regulated by the government’s authority on the environment. The result of the study shows that the legal rights of the government can be utilized to claim civil liability in the form of compensation for ecosystem losses. Constitutionally, the legal basis of the government’s right to file litigation is the State’s right to control the earth, water, and natural resources as regulated in ground norm Article 33 paragraph (3) of the 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia. However, to enforce article 90, the government needs to realize that supervision is the key element of preventive measures. Full article
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Article
Coastal Tourism Management Model toward Developing Independent Tourist Village in Central Lombok District, Indonesia
Resources 2018, 7(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7040069 - 05 Nov 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2622
Abstract
Village development aims to improve the welfare of villagers and the quality of human life. The purpose of this study was to formulate a coastal tourism management model toward developing independent tourist villages. This study employed a quantitative approach by using survey methods. [...] Read more.
Village development aims to improve the welfare of villagers and the quality of human life. The purpose of this study was to formulate a coastal tourism management model toward developing independent tourist villages. This study employed a quantitative approach by using survey methods. The data analysis was performed using structural equation modeling (SEM). There were four variables namely: the potential of mangrove ecosystem, the perception of the coastal community, the coastal tourism facilities, and the coastal ecotourism. The results indicated that there were two variables which had a significant effect on the management of coastal tourist villages, namely the perception of coastal community and coastal ecotourism. Furthermore, the management of a coastal tourist village had a significant effect on the development of independent coastal tourist villages, and the management of coastal tourist villages was a strong mediator to develop an independent coastal tourist village. Full article
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Review

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Review
‘Poisoned Chalice’: Law on Access to Biological and Genetic Resources and Associated Traditional Knowledge in Namibia
Resources 2020, 9(7), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9070083 - 03 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1905
Abstract
Many countries in Africa provide ethnobiological resources (more especially ethnomedicinal plants), which are converted by companies and users from developed countries into biopharmaceutical products without any monetary benefits to the countries of origin. To mitigate the lack of benefits, African countries are beginning [...] Read more.
Many countries in Africa provide ethnobiological resources (more especially ethnomedicinal plants), which are converted by companies and users from developed countries into biopharmaceutical products without any monetary benefits to the countries of origin. To mitigate the lack of benefits, African countries are beginning to enact access and benefit-sharing (ABS) legislation, though their wheels turn very slowly. Since many African ABS laws have not been appraised for their feasibility, this paper presents a contextual analysis of Namibia’s new ABS law: The Access to Biological and Genetic Resources and Associated Traditional Knowledge Act No. 2 of 27 June 2017. Even if several international conventions on ABS and local institutional structures guided the evolution of the 2017 Act, the main drivers for the enactment of the ABS legislation in Namibia are: Inequitable sharing of monetary benefits from the green economy, putative, but unproven cases of biopiracy, and political power contestations over ethnobiological resources. A critical analysis of important challenges faced by Namibia’s new ABS law include: Lack of adequate participatory consultations and technical capacity at the local level, discount of the non-commodity cultural value of TK, ambiguous and narrow definition of the term ‘community’, lack of a clause on confidentiality, and assertions that the new ABS law negatively impacts research in Namibian universities and botanic gardens. In contrast to South Africa’s ABS law, Namibia’s law is more onerous because it does not differentiate between commercial and non-commercial research. Full article
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