Special Issue "Remote Sensing in Forest Hydrology"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Karsten Schulz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Water Management, Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering (IWHW), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), Muthgasse 18 1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: catchment hydrology; remote sensing; uncertainty estimation; soil-plant-atmosphere interactions; hydrological modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest hydrology investigates hydrological processes in forest-dominated ecosystems. This includes the transport and storage of water, snow and water vapour in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, and addresses the complex interaction between the forest vegetation and the abiotic system, e.g. root water uptake that is controlled by atmospheric conditions and photosynthetic activity of the plants. In order to understand and predict energy-driven processes, such as evapotranspiration or snow melt, some knowledge of the radiation and energy balances of a forest catchment is required. Forest hydrology also studies the quality of water and the mobilization and transport of chemical substances within the soil, stream or plant, and requires an understanding of forest/plant physiological and ecological processes.

While those processes and interactions can be well-studied using sophisticated instrumentations at the plot scale, remote sensing technologies are urgently required when processes are monitored, or when forested catchments are managed at larger scales.

We invite submissions of outstanding articles to this Special Issue that will advance the current knowledge of any these processes, states and interaction in forested catchments. Remote sensing techniques may range from optical, thermal, to microwave systems, as well as LIDAR   and ultra-sonic instruments, and can be satellite, aircraft, drone or ground based.

Prof. Dr. Karsten Schulz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Forest Hydrology
  • Remote Sensing
  • Thermal Remote Sensing
  • Evapotranspiration
  • Interception
  • Transpiration
  • Infiltration
  • Runoff
  • Water Balance
  • Snow
  • Snow Cover
  • Energy Balance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Canopy Effects on Snow Accumulation: Observations from Lidar, Canonical-View Photos, and Continuous Ground Measurements from Sensor Networks
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(11), 1769; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10111769 - 08 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
A variety of canopy metrics were extracted from the snow-off airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements over three study areas in the central and southern Sierra Nevada. Two of the sites, Providence and Wolverton, had wireless snow-depth sensors since 2008, with the [...] Read more.
A variety of canopy metrics were extracted from the snow-off airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements over three study areas in the central and southern Sierra Nevada. Two of the sites, Providence and Wolverton, had wireless snow-depth sensors since 2008, with the third site, Pinecrest having sensors since 2014. At Wolverton and Pinecrest, images were captured and the sky-view factors were derived from hemispherical-view photos. We found the variation of snow accumulation across the landscape to be significantly related to canopy-cover conditions. Using a regularized regression model Elastic Net to model the normalized snow accumulation with canopy metrics as independent variables, we found that about 50 % of snow accumulation variability at each site can be explained by the canopy metrics from lidar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Forest Hydrology)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Estimating Water-Use Efficiency in a Temperate Forest
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(5), 796; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10050796 - 20 May 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Water-use efficiency (WUE) is a critical variable describing the interrelationship between carbon uptake and water loss in land ecosystems. Different WUE formulations (WUEs) including intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi), inherent water use efficiency (IWUE), and underlying water use efficiency (uWUE) have [...] Read more.
Water-use efficiency (WUE) is a critical variable describing the interrelationship between carbon uptake and water loss in land ecosystems. Different WUE formulations (WUEs) including intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi), inherent water use efficiency (IWUE), and underlying water use efficiency (uWUE) have been proposed. Based on continuous measurements of carbon and water fluxes and solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) at a temperate forest, we analyze the correlations between SIF emission and the different WUEs at the canopy level by using linear regression (LR) and Gaussian processes regression (GPR) models. Overall, we find that SIF emission has a good potential to estimate IWUE and uWUE, especially when a combination of different SIF bands and a GPR model is used. At an hourly time step, canopy-level SIF emission can explain as high as 65% and 61% of the variances in IWUE and uWUE. Specifically, we find that (1) a daily time step by averaging hourly values during daytime can enhance the SIF-IWUE correlations, (2) the SIF-IWUE correlations decrease when photosynthetically active radiation and air temperature exceed their optimal biological thresholds, (3) a low Leaf Area Index (LAI) has a negative effect on the SIF-IWUE correlations due to large evaporation fluxes, (4) a high LAI in summer also reduces the SIF-IWUE correlations most likely due to increasing scattering and (re)absorption of the SIF signal, and (5) the observation time during the day has a strong impact on the SIF-IWUE correlations and SIF measurements in the early morning have the lowest power to estimate IWUE due to the large evaporation of dew. This study provides a new way to evaluate the stomatal regulation of plant-gas exchange without complex parameterizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Forest Hydrology)
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