Special Issue "Hope in Dark Times"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. John McDowell

Director of Research, Office of the Vice Chancellor, University of Divinity, Melbourne, 29 College Crescent, Parkville, Melbourne VIC3052, Australia
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: theology of hope, political theory, critical theory, modern German theology, German Idealism, theology of prayer, higher education, violence in popular culture, theology of Karl Barth

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soon after the victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election a striking image appeared on a social media network. This was a photograph of a pavement advertisement board outside a bookshop. The board read: “Dystopian fiction now found in the political history section”. The end of history has not led to the clash of civilisations as much as the very conditions that may force one to ask with Nicholas Lash whether “a global conversation” is now even possible when non-agonistically disciplined relations become scarce and the ‘common’ of common interests or the common good is reduced to semantic nostalgia. A number of academic political analysists have developed Hannah Arendt’s notion of “dark times” in order to capture a sense of political conditions depictable in terms of concerns over the erasure of liberal democracy and the rise of an apocalyptic imagination.

In this special edition on Hope in Dark Times, papers are invited that help wrestle with these crucial questions for the times. Some areas the papers might explore include:

  • The apocalyptic imagination
  • Apocalyptic politics
  • Utopianism/dystopianism
  • The hopefulness of the eschatological imagination
  • Hope in consumer cultures
  • Hope and neo-imperialism
  • Hope in ‘religious’ traditions
  • Hope and common flourishing
  • Hope, terror and liberation
  • Hope’s relation to despair and optimism
  • Hope and the tragic imagination
  • Hope, hospitality and the neighbour

Prof. Dr. John McDowell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charges (APCs) of 550 CHF (Swiss Francs) per published paper are partially funded by institutions through Knowledge Unlatched for a limited number of papers per year. Please contact the editorial office before submission to check whether KU waivers, or discounts are still available. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hope
  • eschtology
  • apocalyptic
  • shared flourishing
  • despair and optimism
  • utopianism and dystopianism
  • the tragic
  • terror
  • liberation
  • hospitality
  • neoliberalism
  • neo-imperialism

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle “‘You Shall Love the Alien as Yourself’: Hope, Hospitality, and Love of the Stranger in the Teachings of Jesus”
Religions 2019, 10(3), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10030220 (registering DOI)
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 18 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
PDF Full-text (209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Trump administration’s controversial immigration policy has provoked significant opposition, including against a 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government over Trump’s insistence on a “wall,” but the most outrage was generated by the “zero-tolerance policy” for refugees and asylum seekers that resulted [...] Read more.
The Trump administration’s controversial immigration policy has provoked significant opposition, including against a 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government over Trump’s insistence on a “wall,” but the most outrage was generated by the “zero-tolerance policy” for refugees and asylum seekers that resulted in the forced separation of thousands of children from their parents. This essay evaluates the current U.S. policy in light of the life and teachings of Jesus as portrayed in the New Testament Gospels, beginning with the flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13–15; cf. Deuteronomy 10:19–20) but focusing primarily on Jesus’s teachings on hospitality—including the love of neighbor and the stranger—for those people with their “backs against the wall,” in the words of Howard Thurman. Key passages include the parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:26–37), the Sheep and Goats (Matthew 25:31–46), and the Great Dinner (Luke 14:15–24). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hope in Dark Times)
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