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The Book of Revelation: Hope in Dark Times
Open AccessArticle

Hope in Exile: In Conversation with Ezekiel

Biblical Department, Yarra Theological Union, University of Divinity, Melbourne VIC 3128, Australia
Religions 2019, 10(8), 476; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10080476
Received: 12 July 2019 / Revised: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 9 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hope in Dark Times)
The question of hope in dark times, though topical, is not new. The Babylonian Exile (597/587–539 BCE) is commonly recognised as perhaps the most profound, yet also most fruitful crisis in biblical (Old Testament) times. It involved the total breakdown of all religious and political structures and institutions that previously had provided meaning and protection, yet it led to significant theological progress, laying the foundations for both Judaism and Christianity. Today the metaphor of exile is sometimes used with reference to the present; however, the connection is usually not further explored. This article examines a biblical exilic voice, the book of Ezekiel, which offers an initial prophetic response to the theological, political and identity crisis of the early Babylonian Exile. While resisting both optimism and despair, Ezekiel arrives at an original, if peculiar, imagination of hope, founded solely on theological conviction. The article outlines this process by discussing select texts of the book as examples, and opens it up to conversation with the present. The logic of Ezekiel’s theocentric hope is bound to ultimately remain foreign to modern thinking. However, while it cannot be directly transferred into our times, the article aims to demonstrate that theological reflection on Ezekiel still yields valuable and transferable impulses for thought. View Full-Text
Keywords: hope; book of Ezekiel; Babylonian Exile; Ezek 37:1–14; Ezek 13:1–16; Ezek 20:1–44; theocentricity; dark times hope; book of Ezekiel; Babylonian Exile; Ezek 37:1–14; Ezek 13:1–16; Ezek 20:1–44; theocentricity; dark times
MDPI and ACS Style

Hiebel, J.M. Hope in Exile: In Conversation with Ezekiel. Religions 2019, 10, 476.

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