Next Article in Journal
Religious Identity and Public Pro-Environmental Behavior in China: The Mediating Role of Environmental Risk Perception
Next Article in Special Issue
‘He Will Rescue Us Again’: Affliction and Hope in 2 Corinthians 1:8–11
Previous Article in Journal
Is Comparison Based on Translatable Formal Concepts?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Lullaby: Births, Deaths and Narratives of Hope
Open AccessArticle

Thoughtfulness and Hospitality: On Refusing Antagonistic Politics at the End of History

Philosophy, Theology and Moral Theology, St Athanasius College, Donvale VIC3111, Australia
Religions 2020, 11(4), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11040164
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 23 March 2020 / Accepted: 24 March 2020 / Published: 1 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hope in Dark Times)
The paper is constructed around the issues involved for the critical interrogation of the instrumental rationality generating political thoughtlessness in the following claim: “Humanity is in crisis—and there is no exit from that crisis other than solidarity of humans”. [Zygmunt Bauman] To even interrogate this as a crisis requires a depth-analysis of the hegemony of subject-formation, and this occurs in two markedly different ways. The first takes shape around a critical investigation of the neoliberalisation of subjectivity through Francis Fukuyama’s important text, The End of History and the Last Man. The second subjects the neoliberal post-political global subject to a competing antagonistic political construal in Samuel Huntington’s influential The Clash of Civilizations. The implication is of their importance to a genealogy of the range of contemporary political possibilities. The suggested repair takes the form of a particular gesture: a gesture towards subjecting the globally fractured subject takes shape within a theological configuration in terms of a Christic politics of neighbourliness. View Full-Text
Keywords: thought and thoughtlessness; Hannah Arendt; the political; neoliberalism; friend/enemy; refugees; disposable persons; Henry Giroux; Francis Fukuyama; Samuel Huntington; critical theory; the neighbour; Immanuel Kant; Nicholas Lash thought and thoughtlessness; Hannah Arendt; the political; neoliberalism; friend/enemy; refugees; disposable persons; Henry Giroux; Francis Fukuyama; Samuel Huntington; critical theory; the neighbour; Immanuel Kant; Nicholas Lash
MDPI and ACS Style

McDowell, J.C. Thoughtfulness and Hospitality: On Refusing Antagonistic Politics at the End of History. Religions 2020, 11, 164.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop