Special Issue "Current Operational Issues in Open Access"

A special issue of Publications (ISSN 2304-6775).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Ms. Barbara Meyers Ford

President of Meyers Consulting Services, 6610 Christy Acres Circle, Mount Airy, MD 21771-7473, USA
E-Mail
Interests: professional & scholarly communications; learned society management; publishing education & training; STM research & publishing; economic, educational, environmental, equality, and social changes needed in the world
Guest Editor
Ms. Mary Anne Baynes

Chief Marketing Officer – Overleaf, 1421 Bridgeport Dr., Raleigh, NC 27615, USA
E-Mail
Phone: 919-452-6742
Interests: professional and scholarly communications; STM research and publishing; facilitating global, interdisciplinary scientific research; cloud-based collaborative tools and technology; encouraging innovation in the scientific and publishing communities through amazing new technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to be a Guest Editor for a Special Issue of Publications, on the subject of “Operational Issues in Open Access Publishing”. As we all know, Open Access (OA) is no longer an option for professional and scholarly publishing. Rather, it is a challenge to incorporate this new business model into current publishing programs. The Special Issue will look at a variety of issues, such as (but not limited to):

  • new publisher-author relationships
  • integrating new standards into manuscript submission systems
  • developing and incorporating data management and mining in support of increased discoverability which has become all the more essential with OA publishing
  • comparative research in such areas as article-processing charges (setting and collecting Article Processing Charge (APC))
  • collaboration among organizations (Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), Ringgold, Technology Companies, etc.) to support publishing operations

Barbara Meyers Ford
Mary Anne Baynes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Publications is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  •     Open Access
  •     OA Operational Issues
  •     Publishers and Open Access
  •     OA Stakeholders
  •     OA Collaboration
  •     OA Technology
  •     Open Access and Author Relations

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Research Articles about Open Access Indexed by Scopus: A Content Analysis
Publications 2016, 4(4), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications4040031
Received: 31 May 2016 / Revised: 19 August 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 11 October 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study analyzes research articles about open access (OA) indexed by the Scopus database, published from 2001 to 2015, in order to: (a) propose a categorization scheme about OA; (b) categorize the scientific production about OA; and (c) identify research trends on OA [...] Read more.
This study analyzes research articles about open access (OA) indexed by the Scopus database, published from 2001 to 2015, in order to: (a) propose a categorization scheme about OA; (b) categorize the scientific production about OA; and (c) identify research trends on OA through disciplines at international level over time. The authors used descriptive statistical methods and deductive content analysis using an unconstrained matrix in 347 selected research articles. The most explored themes were found to be “overview, current state, and growth of OA” counting for 98 articles (28.2%), and “awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward OA” for 75 articles (21.6%). As a conclusion, this study reveals a continuous and growing research interest by the OA community in studies focused on case studies regarding the development or evolution of OA in relation to certain groups, institutions, regions, periods, and how different actors perceive and address the OA movement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Open Access, Innovation, and Research Infrastructure
Publications 2016, 4(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications4020017
Received: 25 March 2016 / Accepted: 10 June 2016 / Published: 20 June 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (181 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article we argue that the current endeavors to achieve open access in scientific literature require a discussion about innovation in scholarly publishing and research infrastructure. Drawing on path dependence theory and addressing different open access (OA) models and recent political endeavors, [...] Read more.
In this article we argue that the current endeavors to achieve open access in scientific literature require a discussion about innovation in scholarly publishing and research infrastructure. Drawing on path dependence theory and addressing different open access (OA) models and recent political endeavors, we argue that academia is once again running the risk of outsourcing the organization of its content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
Open AccessArticle
Stepping up Open Science Training for European Research
Publications 2016, 4(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications4020016
Received: 7 April 2016 / Accepted: 9 June 2016 / Published: 17 June 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (947 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as [...] Read more.
Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
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Other

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Open AccessEssay
Open Access in Context: Connecting Authors, Publications and Workflows Using ORCID Identifiers
Publications 2016, 4(4), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications4040030
Received: 1 April 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (182 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As scholarly communications became digital, Open Access and, more broadly, open research, emerged among the most exciting possibilities of the academic Web. However, these possibilities have been constrained by phenomena carried over from the print age. Information resources dwell in discrete silos. It [...] Read more.
As scholarly communications became digital, Open Access and, more broadly, open research, emerged among the most exciting possibilities of the academic Web. However, these possibilities have been constrained by phenomena carried over from the print age. Information resources dwell in discrete silos. It is difficult to connect authors and others unambiguously to specific outputs, despite advances in algorithmic matching. Connecting funding information, datasets, and other essential research information to individuals and their work is still done manually at great expense in time and effort. Given that one of the greatest benefits of the modern web is the rich array of links between digital objects and related resources that it enables, this is a significant failure. The ability to connect, discover, and access resources is the underpinning premise of open research, so tools to enable this, themselves open, are vital. The increasing adoption of resolvable, persistent identifiers for people, digital objects, and research information offers a means of providing these missing connections. This article describes some of the ways that identifiers can help to unlock the potential of open research, focusing on the Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier (ORCID), a person identifier that also serves to link other identifiers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Operational Issues in Open Access)
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