Special Issue "Polymer and Polymeric Nanocomposite Materials for Photonic Applications"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Sergi Gallego Rico
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Universitat d'Alacant, Alicante, Spain
Interests: Photopolymers; holography; biopolymers; h-pdlc; liquid crystal polymers; light-sensitive materials; nanocomposites; spatial light modulators; holographic memories; diffractive optical elements; holographic optical elements
Prof. Yasuo Tomita
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: Photonic nanocomposite materials; nonlinear optics, neutron optics; information photonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Holographic photopolymerization is a simple and low-cost method to fabricate 1D, 2D, and 3D photonic structures. Their periodicity can be modified depending on the method of fabrication, this enables a wide variety of potential applications which include reflecting flat-panel displays, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, diffractive lenses, optical data storage, solar concentrators, wearable/see-through displays, sensors, etc. Depending on the particular application, the chemical composition of the photopolymer should be optimized. During the last two decades, different photopolymerizable nano-compounds were introduced and developed in order to modify polymer properties. In this sense, inorganic and organic nanoparticles have been introduced to increase the refractive index modulation and/or to reduce the shrinkage. In particular, liquid crystal polymer composites have been added to the category of active photopolymer materials with a switchable option under an appropriate electric field.

This Special Issue focuses on polymeric and polymer nanocomposite materials for photonic applications and will aim at demonstrating researchers’ ability to design, synthesize, and manufacture photopolymer-based materials that address the challenges posed by classical and emerging holographic applications.

Prof. Sergi Gallego Rico
Prof. Yasuo Tomita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Self-processing photopolymers
  • Nanocomposite polymer materials
  • Photorefractive polymers
  • HPDLC and POLICRYPS
  • Holographic optical elements
  • Diffractive optical elements
  • Holographic interferometry
  • Photopolymers for holographic data storage
  • Polymers for holographic lithography
  • Theoretical modeling of photosensitive polymers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Complex Diffractive Optical Elements Stored in Photopolymers
Polymers 2019, 11(12), 1920; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11121920 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
We study the recording of complex diffractive elements, such as achromatic lenses, fork gratings or axicons. Using a 3-D diffusion model, previously validated, we are able to predict the behavior of photopolymer during recording. The experimental recording of these complex elements is possible [...] Read more.
We study the recording of complex diffractive elements, such as achromatic lenses, fork gratings or axicons. Using a 3-D diffusion model, previously validated, we are able to predict the behavior of photopolymer during recording. The experimental recording of these complex elements is possible thanks to a new generation spatial light modulator capable of generating periodic and aperiodic profiles. Both experimental and theoretical are analyzed and compared. The results show not only the good response of theoretical model to predict the behavior of the materials, but also the viability of photopolymers to store these kind of elements. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
LED-Cured Reflection Gratings Stored in an Acrylate-Based Photopolymer
Polymers 2019, 11(4), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040632 - 06 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The storage of volume holographic reflection gratings in low-toxicity photopolymers represents a challenge at present since they can be used in many important applications such as biosensors and holographic optical elements. In this context, an acrylate-based photopolymer developed in our research group was [...] Read more.
The storage of volume holographic reflection gratings in low-toxicity photopolymers represents a challenge at present since they can be used in many important applications such as biosensors and holographic optical elements. In this context, an acrylate-based photopolymer developed in our research group was employed to study the recording of unslanted holographic reflection gratings at high spatial frequencies. The optimal preparation conditions of the photopolymer layers were determinated. The diffraction efficiencies are measured in both recording and curing stage and a comparative study of these values was realized. In addition, a theoretical study using Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory was carried out with the aim of understanding the diffraction efficiency behaviour of both processes. In this work, a maximum diffraction efficiency of 14.1% was reached after a curing process in 150 µm layers at a recording wavelength of 488 nm. This value represents a good result compared to that reported in the literature and opens the way to reflection mode holography research using low-toxicity material. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Raed Malallah   Optical Trajectory Manipulations Using the Self-Written Waveguides Technique
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