Special Issue "Natural Polymers 2014"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2014).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christine E. Schmidt
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, BMSB JG-42, P.O. Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Tel. +1 352-273-9222; Fax: +1 352-273-9221
Interests: biomaterials; scaffolds; natural polymers; electrically conducting polymers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue came as the natural consequence of the great success of the previous one “Natural Polymers”.

Contributions are invited that specifically involve polymers of a natural or biological origin, namely proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. Of particular interest are research studies or review articles related to the following areas: (1) connections between polymer science fundamentals with the understanding and applications of natural polymers, including the structure, behavior and uses of natural polymers in solutions, complexes and at interfaces with other materials; (2) bioengineering applications of natural polymers, including tissue engineering, clinical medicine, as well as pharmaceutical and food technologies; and we particularly encourage; (3) novel applications of natural polymers, including their use in bioMEMs devices and nanotechnology as well as novel modifications of natural polymers to enhance their properties by functionalization, cross-linking, or forming composite or co-polymer structures with other materials.

Prof. Dr. Christine E. Schmidt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Biopolymer Based Transdermal Films of Metoclopramide as an Alternative Delivery Approach
Polymers 2014, 6(5), 1350-1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym6051350 - 09 May 2014
Cited by 13
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to develop and to characterize sodium alginate based matrix-type transdermal films of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC) in order to improve patient compliance to treatment. The suitability of sodium alginate was shown to be a natural film former in [...] Read more.
The objectives of this study were to develop and to characterize sodium alginate based matrix-type transdermal films of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC) in order to improve patient compliance to treatment. The suitability of sodium alginate was shown to be a natural film former in terms of the physicochemical, mechanical, and bioadhesive features of the MTC loaded transdermal films. Terpinolene provided the highest drug release among the different terpenes (nerolidol, eucalyptol, dl-limonene, or terpinolene) assessed as enhancer. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis performed to evaluate the effect of the transdermal films on skin barrier confirmed enhancer induced lipid bilayer disruption in stratum corneum, indicating its permeation enhancement effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Polymers 2014)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of the Influence of the Fiber Type in Polymer Matrix/Fiber Bond Using Natural Organic Polymer Stabilizer
Polymers 2014, 6(4), 977-994; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym6040977 - 31 Mar 2014
Cited by 16
Abstract
This research study compares the effect of polypropylene and wool fibers on the mechanical properties of natural polymer based stabilized soils. Biocomposites are becoming increasingly prevalent and this growth is expected to continue within a number of sectors including building materials. The aim [...] Read more.
This research study compares the effect of polypropylene and wool fibers on the mechanical properties of natural polymer based stabilized soils. Biocomposites are becoming increasingly prevalent and this growth is expected to continue within a number of sectors including building materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different fiber reinforced natural polymer stabilized soils with regards to mechanical properties and fiber adhesion characteristics. The polymer includes alginate, which is used in a wide range of applications but has not been commonly used within engineering and construction applications. In recent years, natural fibers have started to be used as an ecological friendly alternative for soil reinforcement within a variety of construction applications. Test results in this study have compared the effects of adding natural and synthetic fibers to clay soils and discussed the importance of an optimum soil specification. A correlation between the micro structural analysis using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fiber typology, fiber–matrix bonds and the mechanical properties of the stabilized soils is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Polymers 2014)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Naturapolyceutics: The Science of Utilizing Natural Polymers for Drug Delivery
Polymers 2014, 6(5), 1312-1332; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym6051312 - 05 May 2014
Cited by 19
Abstract
Naturapolyceutics defines the emerging science and technology platform that blends natural polymers and pharmaceutics for the design and development of drug delivery systems. Natural polymers due to their biological properties, sustainability, chemical flexibility, human and eco-friendliness are promising in this field. As drug [...] Read more.
Naturapolyceutics defines the emerging science and technology platform that blends natural polymers and pharmaceutics for the design and development of drug delivery systems. Natural polymers due to their biological properties, sustainability, chemical flexibility, human and eco-friendliness are promising in this field. As drug delivery advances, there will be need for more polymers. Given that polymers utilized in pharmaceuticals require regulatory approval, robust processes are undertaken to facilitate the production of pharmaceutical grade natural polymers. This review provides insight into the processes—extraction, purification, modifications and characterizations—involved in the eventual utilization of natural polymers for drug delivery. The versatility of natural polymers and particularly modified natural polymers in targeted drug delivery, micro-/nano-drug delivery, theranostics, BioMEMs and generally in research and development of highly efficient, safe and quality products is demonstrated. Natural polymers are polymers of today and tomorrow. Therefore, the shift to undertake training, extensive research and subsequent commercialization of more natural polymers—novel and underutilized—for drug delivery is now! Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Polymers 2014)
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