Physical, Chemical, and Mechanical Properties of Different Polymers in Dentistry and Correlated Areas

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2023) | Viewed by 9889

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, University of Southern Santa Catarina, Tubarao, Brazil
Interests: dental materials; composite resin; adhesive systems; oral rehabilitation; esthetic dentistry
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Guest Editor
Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry at Araraquara, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara, Brazil
Interests: adhesion; endodontic; fiber post; resinous cement
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Guest Editor
Departamento de Odontologia Conservadora (DOC), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Interests: endodontics; endodontic materials; apical periodontitis; irrigants; randomized clinical trials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many materials made by polymers are used daily to solve different problems in different areas of dentistry and correlated areas. This kind of material can be used in various treatments, and its quality can determine prognosis in the long term. This Special Issue will include manuscripts whose main objective is to study the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of different polymers used in these areas.

Dr. Pereira Jefferson Ricardo
Dr. Milton Carlos Carlos Kuga
Dr. Marcus Vinicius Vinicius Reis Só
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymers
  • fiber
  • composite resin
  • adhesive system
  • acrylic resin
  • dentistry

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2901 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Printing Layer Thickness and Orientation on the Mechanical Properties of DLP 3D-Printed Dental Resin
by Andrei Zoltan Farkas, Sergiu-Valentin Galatanu and Riham Nagib
Polymers 2023, 15(5), 1113; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15051113 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3720
Abstract
Technological advances are closely related to the development of new materials and their processing and manufacturing technologies. In the dental field, the high complexity of the geometrical designs of crowns, bridges and other applications of digital light processing 3D-printable biocompatible resins is the [...] Read more.
Technological advances are closely related to the development of new materials and their processing and manufacturing technologies. In the dental field, the high complexity of the geometrical designs of crowns, bridges and other applications of digital light processing 3D-printable biocompatible resins is the reason for the need for a deep understanding of the mechanical proprieties and behavior of these materials. The aim of the present study is to assess the influence of printing layer direction and thickness on the tensile and compression proprieties of a DLP 3D-printable dental resin. Using the NextDent C&B Micro-Filled Hybrid (MFH), 36 specimens (24 for tensile strength testing, 12 for compression testing) were printed at different layer angulations (0°, 45° and 90°) and layer thicknesses (0.1 mm and 0.05 mm). Brittle behavior was observed in all specimens regardless of the direction of printing and layer thickness for the tensile specimens. The highest tensile values were obtained for specimens printed with a layer thickness of 0.05 mm. In conclusion, both printing layer direction and thickness influence mechanical proprieties and can be used to alter the materials’ characteristics and make the final printed product more suitable for its intended purposes. Full article
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12 pages, 26832 KiB  
Article
FEM Analysis of Individualized Polymeric 3D Printed Guide for Orthodontic Mini-Implant Insertion as Temporary Crown Support in the Anterior Maxillary Area
by Riham Nagib, Andrei Zoltan Farkas and Camelia Szuhanek
Polymers 2023, 15(4), 879; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15040879 - 10 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1713
Abstract
Either due to trauma, extraction or congenital factors, the absence of teeth has aesthetic, functional, financial and psychological consequences. The aim of the current study is to assess an individualized polymeric 3D printed digitally planned surgical guide designed to achieve precision and predictability [...] Read more.
Either due to trauma, extraction or congenital factors, the absence of teeth has aesthetic, functional, financial and psychological consequences. The aim of the current study is to assess an individualized polymeric 3D printed digitally planned surgical guide designed to achieve precision and predictability in non-standard mini-implant orthodontic cases. Twenty-seven patient records with missing anterior teeth were selected from the database of a private clinic in Timisoara, Romania. Based on the analysis of the cases included in the research, a surgical guide for the insertion of mini-implants as provisional crown support was designed. An FEM simulation was performed using the Abaqus numerical analysis software. Finite element simulation revealed the maximum displacements and stresses that occur in the surgical guide. Mini-implant supported provisional crowns can be a simple and low-cost method to increase patient self-esteem and compliance with the orthodontic treatment. Computer aided mechanical simulation is a useful tool in analyzing different polymeric surgical guide designs before being used in clinical situations in order to avoid failure. Full article
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10 pages, 1731 KiB  
Article
The Influence on Fracture Resistance of Different Composite Resins and Prefabricated Posts to Restore Endodontically Treated Teeth
by Saulo Pamato, Weber Adad Ricci, Milton Carlos Kuga, Eliane Cristina Gulin de Oliveira, João Carlos Silos Moraes, Marcus Vinicius Reis Só, Tamara Carolina Trevisan, Newton Fahl Júnior and Jefferson Ricardo Pereira
Polymers 2023, 15(1), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15010236 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2158
Abstract
Recent formulations of resin-based composites have incorporated different combinations of materials. However, the mechanical and bonding behavior of these materials with intraradicular posts are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of light-cure and dual-cure resin composite posts on the fracture resistance [...] Read more.
Recent formulations of resin-based composites have incorporated different combinations of materials. However, the mechanical and bonding behavior of these materials with intraradicular posts are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of light-cure and dual-cure resin composite posts on the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Ninety extracted human upper canines were selected and randomly divided into nine groups (n=10): (G1) endodontically treated teeth without endodontic posts; (G2) glass-fiber post cemented with glass-ionomer cement; (G3) endodontic post by dual-cure composite resin (Rebilda DC); (G4) endodontic post by dual-cure composite resin (Cosmecore); (G5) endodontic post by dual-cure composite resin (Bis-Core); (G6) endodontic post by light-cure composite resin; (G7) glass-fiber post customized with flowable composite resin; (G8) glass-fiber post cemented with light-cure composite resin; (G9) glass-fiber post cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. After the post insertion, all specimens were subjected to mechanical (250,000 cycles) and thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5 °C/55 °C) and immediate loading at 45 degrees in a universal testing machine until fracture. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons using the Fisher LSD Method (p < 0 05). Results: The mean failure loads (±SD) for the groups ranged from 100.7 ± 22.6 N to 221.9 ± 48.9 N. The G1 group (without endodontic posts) had a higher fracture strength than all experimental groups (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Within the limitations, the light- and dual-cure post technique did not present lower fracture resistance values as compared to the conventional glass-fiber post. Full article
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11 pages, 1170 KiB  
Article
Effect of Curing Modes on the Mechanical Properties of Commercial Dental Resin-Based Composites: Comparison between Different LEDs and Microwave Units
by Alef Vermudt, Milton Carlos Kuga, João Felipe Besegato, Eliane Cristina Gulin de Oliveira, Thaís Piragine Leandrin, Marcus Vinicius Reis Só, João Carlos Silos Moraes and Jefferson Ricardo Pereira
Polymers 2022, 14(19), 4020; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14194020 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1693
Abstract
Resin-based composites (RBCs) have transformed restorative dentistry and its procedures. However, the characteristics of RBCs have been modified over the years to enhance the physical and chemical properties of the materials. This context raises the need for studies that evaluate whether the properties [...] Read more.
Resin-based composites (RBCs) have transformed restorative dentistry and its procedures. However, the characteristics of RBCs have been modified over the years to enhance the physical and chemical properties of the materials. This context raises the need for studies that evaluate whether the properties of the RBCs that are commercially available are clinically adequate with different curing modes. This study aimed to evaluate the mechanical behavior of commercial RBCs after undergoing different curing modes. Twenty-three RBCs of different classes were evaluated. For curing the specimens, a microwave (BMS45, Brastemp) (for 3 min at 450 W) and three LED units were used: an Emitter A Fit (Schuster (second generation)) (light-curing for 15 s with an irradiance of 1250 mW/cm2), VALO (Ultradent (third generation)) (light-curing for 15 s with an irradiance of 1100 mW/cm2), and Emitter Now Duo (Schuster (second generation)) (light-curing for 15 s with an irradiance of 1100 mW/cm2). A total of 670 RBC specimens of 8 mm in diameter and 1 mm in depth were obtained. Afterward, a biaxial flexure strength test was performed until the failure of the specimens, using a universal testing machine set at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The same specimens were subjected to infrared spectroscopy for evaluating the degree of conversion. Tukey’s test was used for multiple comparisons at a significance level of 5%. The light-curing mode did not affect the flexure strength of the RBCs (p > 0.05), but the type and shade of RBCs did so (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the type of RBC directly interferes with the mechanical behavior of the material. However, the curing modes within the same RBC did not change the mechanical properties. Full article
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