Special Issue "Laser–Plasma Interactions and Applications"

A special issue of Plasma (ISSN 2571-6182).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 3797

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Victor Kantsyrev
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557, USA
Interests: high energy density physics with focus in z-pinch and laser plasma physics; physics of z-pinch and laser plasma (solid and gas-puff targets) sources of x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (euv) radiation; inertial confinement fusion; pulsed power physics; x-ray/euv spectroscopy and polarimetry; x-ray/euv diagnostics and instrumentation for hot plasma and atomic physics research; glass-capillary optics for x-ray and euv radiation; surface modification with laser and x-ray beams in science and technology; x-ray lithography with laser plasma and z-pinch plasma sources of radiation for microelectronics; x-ray microscopy with plasma x-ray sources for biology and medicine; optoelectronics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Laser–plasma interactions and applications cover the fundamental and applied aspects of high-power laser plasma physics. These include studies of the interaction of laser radiation with matter under extreme conditions (the effect of a radiation field on excitation and ionization in non-LTE high energy density plasmas, energetic electron generation and transport in laser plasma, shock waves and equations of state related to laser plasma, etc.), inertial confinement fusion research, laser plasma particles and radiation sources (laser plasma accelerators, coherent light sources in x-ray and extreme ultraviolet, generation of femtosecond and attosecond radiation pulses, etc.).

In this Special Issue titled “Laser–Plasma Interactions and Applications”, we invite submissions reporting new results in experiments, theory and numerical simulations, as well as papers discussing recent and potential applications. Topics of interest generally include (but are not limited to):

  • High-intensity lasers;
  • Laser-produced plasmas;
  • Plasma physics;
  • Electron beams;
  • X-ray emission;
  • Plasma diagnostics;
  • Plasma simulations;
  • Inertial confinement fusion;
  • Plasma sources;
  • Solid state targets;
  • Gas jet targets.

Prof. Dr. Victor Kantsyrev
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plasma is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high-intensity lasers
  • laser-produced plasmas
  • plasma physics
  • electron beams
  • x-ray and euv emission
  • plasma diagnostics
  • plasma simulations
  • inertial confinement fusion
  • plasma sources
  • solid state targets
  • gas jet targets

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Parametric Study of Proton Acceleration from Laser-Thin Foil Interaction
Plasma 2021, 4(4), 670-680; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4040034 - 02 Oct 2021
Viewed by 957
Abstract
We experimentally investigated the accelerated proton beam characteristics such as maximum energy and number by varying the incident laser parameters. For this purpose, we varied the laser energy, focal spot size, polarization, and pulse duration. The proton spectra were recorded using a single-shot [...] Read more.
We experimentally investigated the accelerated proton beam characteristics such as maximum energy and number by varying the incident laser parameters. For this purpose, we varied the laser energy, focal spot size, polarization, and pulse duration. The proton spectra were recorded using a single-shot Thomson parabola spectrometer equipped with a microchannel plate and a high-resolution charge-coupled device with a wide detection range from a few tens of keV to several MeV. The outcome of the experimental findings is discussed in detail and compared to other theoretical works. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser–Plasma Interactions and Applications)
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Article
An Investigation into the Approximations Used in Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics for the Study of Warm Dense Matter
Plasma 2021, 4(2), 294-308; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4020020 - 27 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1240
Abstract
Wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) has recently received a lot of attention as a computationally fast tool with which to study dynamical processes in warm dense matter beyond the Born–Oppenheimer approximation. These techniques, typically, employ many approximations to achieve computational efficiency while implementing [...] Read more.
Wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) has recently received a lot of attention as a computationally fast tool with which to study dynamical processes in warm dense matter beyond the Born–Oppenheimer approximation. These techniques, typically, employ many approximations to achieve computational efficiency while implementing semi-empirical scaling parameters to retain accuracy. We investigated three of the main approximations ubiquitous to WPMD: a restricted basis set, approximations to exchange, and the lack of correlation. We examined each of these approximations in regard to atomic and molecular hydrogen in addition to a dense hydrogen plasma. We found that the biggest improvement to WPMD comes from combining a two-Gaussian basis with a semi-empirical correction based on the valence-bond wave function. A single parameter scales this correction to match experimental pressures of dense hydrogen. Ultimately, we found that semi-empirical scaling parameters are necessary to correct for the main approximations in WPMD. However, reducing the scaling parameters for more ab-initio terms gives more accurate results and displays the underlying physics more readily. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser–Plasma Interactions and Applications)
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Article
Method for Measuring the Laser Field and the Opacity of Spectral Lines in Plasmas
Plasma 2021, 4(1), 65-74; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma4010003 - 20 Jan 2021
Viewed by 680
Abstract
In experimental studies of laser-plasma interactions, the laser radiation can exist inside plasma regions where the electron density is below the critical density (“underdense” plasma), as well as at the surface of the critical density. The surface of the critical density could exhibit [...] Read more.
In experimental studies of laser-plasma interactions, the laser radiation can exist inside plasma regions where the electron density is below the critical density (“underdense” plasma), as well as at the surface of the critical density. The surface of the critical density could exhibit a rich physics. Namely, the incident laser radiation can get converted in transverse electromagnetic waves of significantly higher amplitudes than the incident radiation, due to various nonlinear processes. We proposed a diagnostic method based on the laser-produced satellites of hydrogenic spectral lines in plasmas. The method allows measuring both the laser field (or more generally, the field of the resulting transverse electromagnetic wave) and the opacity from experimental spectrum of a hydrogenic line exhibiting satellites. This spectroscopic diagnostic should be useful for a better understanding of laser-plasma interactions, including relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser–Plasma Interactions and Applications)
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