Special Issue "Tactileology: Background and Developments"

A special issue of Philosophies (ISSN 2409-9287).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2022) | Viewed by 4332

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yasuhiro Suzuki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Informatics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan
Interests: informatics of sensibility and tactile sense; natural computing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tactile signals are a common language in nature. Humans and animals interact tactilely across species. In addition, virus infection occurs through macromolecular-mediated tactile interactions between sugar chains on the virus's surface and cells. Artificial intelligence and . Information technology has been centered on symbol manipulation, and sensibility and tactile information processing is still a challenge. The symbol is a medium of logic, and tactile language is a medium of sensitivity. With the rapid development of IoT, such as XaaS, people worry that artificial intelligence and science and technology will overtake humans because new technologies do not have the sensibility to communicate with us. If people can have sensibility communications with new technologies via tactile sense, likewise communicating with a cat or dog, new technologies will be merged into society. In this sense, new technologies expand the abilities of human and nature. In nature, for example, infectious diseases will continue to threaten humankind; therefore, it would be of great value to communicate with them via the tactile sense to respect and sustain each existence. Is it not time then, that we reconsider the tactile sense?

This Special Issue's scope is new thoughts and attempts that are not bound by the aesthetics and philosophy of conventional tactile sensations; scientific theory and practice that open up new science and engineering insights; inclusive design; art/design of tactile sense; etc. In particular, the theme is the tactile sensation that changes with time. However, conventional tactile discourse and science and engineering did not have the concept of time. Only tactile sensations that do not change over time, such as "hard" and "soft", have been dealt with. This Special Issue proposes Tactileology, a new cross-disciplinary research field that considers time-evolving tactile sensations. This Special Issue will be a turning point for tactile dissertation and science and engineering. Based on this Special Issue, new sensitivity and tactile informatics will be born.

Dr. Yasuhiro Suzuki
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • tactile sense
  • time-varying tactile sense
  • philosophy/aesthetics of tactile sense
  • engineering and science of tactile sense
  • sensibility informations
  • Kansei informations

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Touching the Sound, Sounding the Touch. The Tactile Experience in the Music of Santiago Diez-Fischer as a Presentational Symbol
Philosophies 2021, 6(3), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6030072 - 01 Sep 2021
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Abstract
The music of Argentinian composer Santiago Diez-Fischer places particular emphasis on the sense of touch. The sonic textures and the notations the composer use illustrate this. In several pieces, his writing indicates surfaces to rub, caress, and press. The resulting sound is complex, [...] Read more.
The music of Argentinian composer Santiago Diez-Fischer places particular emphasis on the sense of touch. The sonic textures and the notations the composer use illustrate this. In several pieces, his writing indicates surfaces to rub, caress, and press. The resulting sound is complex, often on the edge of noise. In this article, I argue that the notion of presentational symbol as proposed by Susanne Langer serves to clarify how such music is an expression of tactile experience. I show how this notion relates to all music in general, and precisely because music is such a symbol that it can be understood and interpreted in its meaning through listening. I make the assumption that all music is presentational; however, such generality must be overcome by a more important requirement. Once we know that music is a presentational symbol, what does it symbolize? I think music symbolizes different things every time and it is possible to understand this, as long as you listen and bring your own experience into play. Here, I have tried to do this by referring to the work of Santiago Diez-Fischer. I argue then that the emotion of touch is then communicated as a specific and unique musical form. In this sense, Diez-Fischer’s music is paradigmatic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactileology: Background and Developments)
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Article
Soundpainting Sign Language: Possibilities and Connections with Tactileology
Philosophies 2021, 6(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6030069 - 16 Aug 2021
Viewed by 560
Abstract
This article introduce and expose the language of Soundpainting (SP), its background, and how this artistic tool is being used as a language of communication and creation. It also presents the real-time composition and its peculiarities and the power of collective creation as [...] Read more.
This article introduce and expose the language of Soundpainting (SP), its background, and how this artistic tool is being used as a language of communication and creation. It also presents the real-time composition and its peculiarities and the power of collective creation as a creative tool and interaction between artistic disciplines. As there are several cases of sensitive and creative languages, such as Soundpainting, that are used to communicate with artificial intelligence, finally, it expose two of them, which are both still in their embryonic state. Both are collaborations and research between SP sign language and Tactileology. Both can lead to creative results that contribute to new ways of perceiving living art, in a sensitive, social and inclusive way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactileology: Background and Developments)
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Article
The Idea of Landing Sites and Its Inheritance through Tactileology
Philosophies 2021, 6(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6030066 - 06 Aug 2021
Viewed by 584
Abstract
From the perspective of sustainability, empowering people to live positively without being dominated by death is an important issue. One thing we can do in this vein is to expand one’s own physical sensation, which is the basis for us to live. From [...] Read more.
From the perspective of sustainability, empowering people to live positively without being dominated by death is an important issue. One thing we can do in this vein is to expand one’s own physical sensation, which is the basis for us to live. From this point of view, Shusaku Arakawa and Madeline Gins’ idea of “landing sites” is very important. Landing sites are physical experiences that result from person–environment collaboration. In order to make as many people as possible aware of their physical sensations through landing sites, Arakawa and Gins created artificial environments such as “Site of Reversible Destiny Yoro” where people could gain new physical sensations. They wanted people to build new ethics and move toward social reformation based on their new physical sensations. However, at present, these artificial environments have some problems. It is the time to seriously consider how we can pass on the experience of landing sites to future generations. The aim of this paper is to provide an answer to the question by Yasuhiro Suzuki’s scientific research on tactile sense, called tactileology. I first introduce Arakawa and Gin’s text about the idea of “landing sites” and make clear its importance. Next, I point out that, now, “landing sites” present certain difficulties. I then confirm that tactileology inherits the idea of “landing sites”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactileology: Background and Developments)
Article
Investigation of Tactile Illusion Based on Gestalt Theory
Philosophies 2021, 6(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6030060 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 797
Abstract
Time-evolving tactile sensations are important in communication between animals as well as humans. In recent years, this research area has been defined as “tactileology,” and various studies have been conducted. This study utilized the tactile Gestalt theory to investigate these sensations. Since humans [...] Read more.
Time-evolving tactile sensations are important in communication between animals as well as humans. In recent years, this research area has been defined as “tactileology,” and various studies have been conducted. This study utilized the tactile Gestalt theory to investigate these sensations. Since humans recognize shapes with their visual sense and melodies with their auditory sense based on the Prägnanz principle in the Gestalt theory, this study assumed that a time-evolving texture sensation is induced by a tactile Gestalt. Therefore, the operation of such a tactile Gestalt was investigated. Two psychophysical experiments were conducted to clarify the operation of a tactile Gestalt using a tactile illusion phenomenon called the velvet hand illusion (VHI). It was confirmed that the VHI is induced in a tactile Gestalt when the laws of closure and common fate are satisfied. Furthermore, it was clarified that the tactile Gestalt could be formulated using the proposed factors, which included the laws of elasticity and translation, and it had the same properties as a visual Gestalt. For example, the strongest Gestalt factor had the highest priority among multiple competing factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactileology: Background and Developments)
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Article
Two Experimental Devices for Record and Playback of Tactile Data
Philosophies 2021, 6(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6030054 - 30 Jun 2021
Viewed by 648
Abstract
A tactile record and playback system will progress tactileology—a new cross-disciplinary field related to tactile sensations—as it will enhance its use in the instruction, archiving, and analysis of human manipulation. In this paper, we describe two key devices for achieving tactileology: a [...] Read more.
A tactile record and playback system will progress tactileology—a new cross-disciplinary field related to tactile sensations—as it will enhance its use in the instruction, archiving, and analysis of human manipulation. In this paper, we describe two key devices for achieving tactileology: a tactile sensor capturing human tactile sense (fingernail color sensor) and a robotic tactile sensor, both of which can detect not only normal force but also tangential force. This is beneficial because people manipulate objects and tools in various ways, such as grasping, picking, and rubbing. The fingernail color sensor registers the three-dimensional (3D) force applied to a fingertip by detecting the fingernail color change caused by blood distribution under the fingernail, which can be observed with green illumination and a miniature camera. Since detecting this color change is more complicated than using a robotic sensor, the relationships between the image and 3D force are learned using a convolutional neural network (CNN). In the robotic sensor, the 3D force applied to a robotic finger transforms into a bright area using an illuminated acrylic core, a rubber robotic finger skin, and a miniature camera. We measure normal force and tangential force by the brightness and movement of the bright area, respectively. Using a force gauge or an electronic scale for measurement, we perform a series of evaluation experiments. The experimental results show that the precision of both the fingernail color sensor and the robotic tactile sensor are sufficient for our system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactileology: Background and Developments)
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