Special Issue "Cyberphenomenology: Technominds Revolution"

A special issue of Philosophies (ISSN 2409-9287).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2016) | Viewed by 7336

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jordi Vallverdú
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Philosophy Department, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (BCN), Spain
Interests: robot emotions; affective computing; computational cognitive science; human-robot interaction; philosophy of technology; Bayesian probability; blended cognition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite your contributions to the Special Issue “Cyberphenomenology and the Technominds Revolution”.

This Special Issue will be devoted to the challenges expected from two close, and possibly combined, events: a) the upgrading of human minds and bodies (i.e., cyborgs) thanks to technological extensions and bodily implementations, and b) the advent of complex machines with consciousness and emotional interactions.

These mixed agents will require a new view on the notion of ‘body’, ‘nature’, ‘evolution’, ‘moral’, ‘reality’, ‘social sphere’, ‘experience’, and ‘reality/virtuality/augmented reality’. It implies not only an epistemic or moral revolution, but will need a new view on the meaning of ‘Being’.

Jordi Vallverdú
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Philosophies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyberphenomenology
  • cyborg
  • singularity
  • robot
  • AI
  • reality
  • consciousness
  • emotion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Swarm Intelligence via the Internet of Things and the Phenomenological Turn
Philosophies 2017, 2(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies2030019 - 23 Aug 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2001
Abstract
Considering the current advancements in biometric sensors and other related technologies, as well as the use of bio-inspired models for AI improvements, we can infer that the swarm intelligence paradigm can be implemented in human daily spheres through the connectivity between user gadgets [...] Read more.
Considering the current advancements in biometric sensors and other related technologies, as well as the use of bio-inspired models for AI improvements, we can infer that the swarm intelligence paradigm can be implemented in human daily spheres through the connectivity between user gadgets connected to the Internet of Things. This is a first step towards a real Ambient Intelligence, but also of a Global Intelligence. This unconscious (by the user) connectivity may alter the way by which we feel the world. Besides, with the arrival of new augmented ways of capturing and providing information or radical new ways of expanding our bodies (through synthetic biology or artificial prosthesis like brain–computer connections), we can be very close to a change which may radically affect our experience of ourselves and of the feeling of collectivity. We call it the techno-phenomenological turn. We show social implications, present challenges, and and open questions for the new kind of swarm intelligence-enhanced society, and provide the taxonomy of the field of study. We will also explore the possible roadmaps of this next possible situation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberphenomenology: Technominds Revolution)
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Article
Exploring the Computational Explanatory Gap
Philosophies 2017, 2(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies2010005 - 16 Jan 2017
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2780
Abstract
While substantial progress has been made in the field known as artificial consciousness, at the present time there is no generally accepted phenomenally conscious machine, nor even a clear route to how one might be produced should we decide to try. Here, we [...] Read more.
While substantial progress has been made in the field known as artificial consciousness, at the present time there is no generally accepted phenomenally conscious machine, nor even a clear route to how one might be produced should we decide to try. Here, we take the position that, from our computer science perspective, a major reason for this is a computational explanatory gap: our inability to understand/explain the implementation of high-level cognitive algorithms in terms of neurocomputational processing. We explain how addressing the computational explanatory gap can identify computational correlates of consciousness. We suggest that bridging this gap is not only critical to further progress in the area of machine consciousness, but would also inform the search for neurobiological correlates of consciousness and would, with high probability, contribute to demystifying the “hard problem” of understanding the mind–brain relationship. We compile a listing of previously proposed computational correlates of consciousness and, based on the results of recent computational modeling, suggest that the gating mechanisms associated with top-down cognitive control of working memory should be added to this list. We conclude that developing neurocognitive architectures that contribute to bridging the computational explanatory gap provides a credible and achievable roadmap to understanding the ultimate prospects for a conscious machine, and to a better understanding of the mind–brain problem in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberphenomenology: Technominds Revolution)
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Article
Of Cyborgs and Brutes: Technology-Inherited Violence and Ignorance
Philosophies 2017, 2(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies2010001 - 26 Dec 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2235
Abstract
The broad aim of this paper is to question the ambiguous relationship between technology and intelligence. More specifically, it addresses the reasons why the ever-increasing reliance on smart technologies and wide repositories of data does not necessarily increase the display of “smart” or [...] Read more.
The broad aim of this paper is to question the ambiguous relationship between technology and intelligence. More specifically, it addresses the reasons why the ever-increasing reliance on smart technologies and wide repositories of data does not necessarily increase the display of “smart” or even “intelligent” behaviors, but rather increases new instances of “brutality” as a mix of ignorance and violence. We claim that the answer can be found in the cyborg theory, and more specifically in the possibility to blend (not always for the best) different kinds of intentionality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberphenomenology: Technominds Revolution)
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