Special Issue "Surfactant-Based Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Shawn Wettig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: surfactants; drug delivery; nanoparticles; cancer; formulation
Dr. Emmanuel Ho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory for Drug Delivery and Biomaterials, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, Kitchener, Ontatio, Canada
Interests: nanoparticles; surfactants; medical devices; HIV/AIDS; wound healing, cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of surfactants in the field of pharmaceutical sciences is ubiquitous to nearly every type of dosage form.  Surfactants function in the same roles as in other industries, ranging from solubilizers to lubricants, wetting agents, emulsifiers/suspending agents, disinfectants, and so on; however, the importance of surfactants in the design of novel drug delivery systems makes this class of excipients even more important. 

We invite you to submit an article in the area of “Surfactant-Based Drug Delivery”, in which the focus of the article is defined by the surfactant(s) used in the drug delivery system.  Review articles, communications, and original research manuscripts involving the use of traditional surfactants, novel surfactants, polymeric surfactants, biosurfactants, etc., will all be considered for this Special Issue.

Dr. Shawn Wettig
Dr. Emmanuel Ho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surfactant
  • drug delivery
  • dosage form
  • biosurfactant
  • polymeric surfactant.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Self-Micellizing Technology Improves the Properties of Ezetimibe and Increases Its Effect on Hyperlipidemic Rats
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(12), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11120647 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work was to develop ezetimibe self-micellizing solid dispersions using Kolliphor® RH40 (MS-K) as a surfactant incorporating ezetimibe (EZ) into the croscarmellose hydrophilic carrier. Different ezetimibe:Kolliphor® ratios were studied to select micellar systems that improve the dissolution properties [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to develop ezetimibe self-micellizing solid dispersions using Kolliphor® RH40 (MS-K) as a surfactant incorporating ezetimibe (EZ) into the croscarmellose hydrophilic carrier. Different ezetimibe:Kolliphor® ratios were studied to select micellar systems that improve the dissolution properties of ezetimibe. The different formulations were characterized by means of solid state analysis by SEM, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dissolution studies. These physicochemical studies showed a decrease from the crystalline structure of ezetimibe (EZ) to its amorphous state in the micellar systems (MS-K). A rapid dissolution profile was observed in these micellar systems compared to the drug raw material and physical mixture. Efficacy studies were conducted using a high-fat diet that induced hyperlipidemic rats. The micellar system selected (MS-K 1:0.75) revealed a significant improvement in serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and triglycerides (TG) compared to ezetimibe raw material. The histopathological examination of liver tissue also showed that this micellar system exhibited more beneficial effects on liver steatosis compared to ezetimibe raw material (EZ-RM) and the high-fat diet group (HFD). This study suggests that EZ micellar systems using Kolliphor® RH40 could enhance the antihyperlipidemic effect of ezetimibe and reduce liver steatosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surfactant-Based Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Lipid Corona on Rifampicin Intramacrophagic Transport Using Inhaled Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Surface-Decorated with a Mannosylated Surfactant
Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(10), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11100508 - 01 Oct 2019
Abstract
The mimicking of physiological conditions is crucial for the success of accurate in vitro studies. For inhaled nanoparticles, which are designed for being deposited on alveolar epithelium and taken up by macrophages, it is relevant to investigate the interactions with pulmonary surfactant lining [...] Read more.
The mimicking of physiological conditions is crucial for the success of accurate in vitro studies. For inhaled nanoparticles, which are designed for being deposited on alveolar epithelium and taken up by macrophages, it is relevant to investigate the interactions with pulmonary surfactant lining alveoli. As a matter of fact, the formation of a lipid corona layer around the nanoparticles could modulate the cell internalization and the fate of the transported drugs. Based on this concept, the present research focused on the interactions between pulmonary surfactant and Solid Lipid Nanoparticle assemblies (SLNas), loaded with rifampicin, an anti-tuberculosis drug. SLNas were functionalized with a synthesized mannosylated surfactant, both alone and in a blend with sodium taurocholate, to achieve an active targeting to mannose receptors present on alveolar macrophages (AM). Physico-chemical properties of the mannosylated SLNas satisfied the requirements relative to suitable respirability, drug payload, and AM active targeting. Our studies have shown that a lipid corona is formed around SLNas in the presence of Curosurf, a commercial substitute of the natural pulmonary surfactant. The lipid corona promoted an additional resistance to the drug diffusion for SLNas functionalized with the mannosylated surfactant and this improved drug retention within SLNas before AM phagocytosis takes place. Moreover, lipid corona formation did not modify the role of nanoparticle mannosylation towards the specific receptors on MH-S cell membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surfactant-Based Drug Delivery)
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