Advances in the Development of Cutting-Edge Drug Delivery Systems for the Effective Treatment of Chronic Skin Wounds, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 2769

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: biomaterial design; polyurethane synthesis; bioprinting; wound healing; drug delivery systems; multi-stimuli-responsive polymers; bioink design; cell culture; tissue modeling; inflammation modelling; hydrogels
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hard-to-close wounds represent a huge burden on both society and healthcare systems, and their impact is expected to progressively grow due to the aging population and increasing incidence of obesity. To tackle this critical issue, a great variety of wound dressings have been developed that aim to locally release therapeutic agents, promptly address infections, and provide a proper wound environment to enhance tissue healing. Advancements in biomaterial design, diagnostic imaging, and material processing techniques have significantly supported the research on smart and innovative platforms. However, the ideal wound dressing still does not exist.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims at critically discussing the state of the art of wound dressings and highlighting future directions for the development of advanced systems to treat chronic skin wounds. We welcome the submission of original research articles and short communications, as well as reviews, mini-reviews, and systematic review articles. Special attention will be devoted to works dealing with the design of innovative drug delivery carriers (e.g., nanoparticles, hydrogels, membranes, scaffolds), smart patches, wound-responsive systems, drug-releasing bioinks, antimicrobial materials, and antibiotic-free treatments.

Dr. Monica Boffito
Dr. Rossella Laurano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • wound healing
  • hard-to-close skin wounds
  • biofilm
  • infected wounds
  • drug delivery systems
  • controlled drug release
  • stimuli-responsive hydrogels
  • biomaterials
  • antimicrobial materials
  • 3D bioprinted wound dressings
  • nanofibrous membranes
  • personalized wound dressings
  • tissue engineering
  • antibiotic-free treatments
  • nanoparticles

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

27 pages, 2197 KiB  
Review
Photodynamic Therapy, Probiotics, Acetic Acid, and Essential Oil in the Treatment of Chronic Wounds Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa
by Jaeson D. Chin, Lei Zhao, Trenton G. Mayberry, Braydon C. Cowan, Mark R. Wakefield and Yujiang Fang
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(6), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15061721 - 13 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2230
Abstract
As a prevalent medical problem that burdens millions of patients across the world, chronic wounds pose a challenge to the healthcare system. These wounds, often existing as a comorbidity, are vulnerable to infections. Consequently, infections hinder the healing process and complicate clinical management [...] Read more.
As a prevalent medical problem that burdens millions of patients across the world, chronic wounds pose a challenge to the healthcare system. These wounds, often existing as a comorbidity, are vulnerable to infections. Consequently, infections hinder the healing process and complicate clinical management and treatment. While antibiotic drugs remain a popular treatment for infected chronic wounds, the recent rise of antibiotic-resistant strains has hastened the need for alternative treatments. Future impacts of chronic wounds are likely to increase with aging populations and growing obesity rates. With the need for more effective novel treatments, promising research into various wound therapies has seen an increased demand. This review summarizes photodynamic therapy, probiotics, acetic acid, and essential oil studies as developing antibiotic-free treatments for chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clinicians may find this review informative by gaining a better understanding of the state of current research into various antibiotic-free treatments. Furthermore. this review provides clinical significance, as clinicians may seek to implement photodynamic therapy, probiotics, acetic acid, or essential oils into their own practice. Full article
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