Special Issue "Fungal Pathogens of Forest Trees"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Robert E. Marra
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Pathology & EcologyThe Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Of the principle taxonomic groups of organisms that cause biotic diseases in trees, fungi are by far the most important and consequential; this statement has even greater veracity if we include with the true fungi the many important tree pathogens in the morphologically similar but phylogenetically unrelated phylum, the Oomycota. Tree diseases caused by fungi can be grouped broadly according to the targeted host tissue and the pathogens’ principal mode of attack, resulting in a strong correlation between disease types and the fungal groups that cause them. Hence, most foliar diseases are caused by specific orders within the Ascomycota, as well as rusts in the Basidiomycota. Ascomycetes also predominate as canker-causing fungi as well as those that cause the devastating vascular wilts. Stem, butt, and root rots are caused principally by species in the Basidiomycota.

As trees of the forest—both urban and woodland—experience increasing stressors due to global warming, climate change, and the pressures of a growing human population, fungal pathogens will manifest synergistically with these stressors in increasingly greater expression of decline and disease.

For this Special Issue, we invite research papers and review articles covering all aspects of the biology and epidemiology of fungal pathogens of forest trees, particularly those that involve complex interactions with other biotic (e.g., insect vectors) and abiotic (e.g., climate change) stressors. We look forward to publishing your research results and review articles.

Dr. Robert E. Marra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Forest pathology
  • Mycology
  • Ascomycota
  • Basidiomycota
  • Oomycota

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Bacillus licheniformis MH48 on Control of Foliar Fungal Diseases and Growth Promotion of Camellia oleifera Seedlings in the Coastal Reclaimed Land of Korea
Pathogens 2019, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8010006 - 09 Jan 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This study investigated the control of foliar fungal diseases and growth promotion of Camellia oleifera seedlings in coastal reclaimed land through the use of Bacillus licheniformis MH48. B. licheniformis MH48 can produce lytic enzymes chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase that can inhibit foliar pathogens by [...] Read more.
This study investigated the control of foliar fungal diseases and growth promotion of Camellia oleifera seedlings in coastal reclaimed land through the use of Bacillus licheniformis MH48. B. licheniformis MH48 can produce lytic enzymes chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase that can inhibit foliar pathogens by 37.4 to 50.5%. Nevertheless, foliar diseases appeared in the seedlings with bacterial inoculation, and their survival rate decreased because they were unable to withstand salt stress. However, B. licheniformis MH48 significantly increased the total nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the soils through fixing atmospheric nitrogen and solubilizing phosphorus. The growth of seedlings with bacterial inoculation increased, particularly in root dry weight, by 7.42 g plant−1, which was 1.7-fold greater than that of the control. B. licheniformis MH48 produces the phytohormone auxin, which potentially stimulates seedling root growth. C. oleifera seedlings significantly increased in total nitrogen content to 317.57 mg plant−1 and total phosphorus content to 46.86 mg plant−1. Our results revealed the effectiveness of B. licheniformis MH48 not only in the control of foliar fungal diseases but also in the growth promotion of C. oleifera seedlings in coastal lands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Pathogens of Forest Trees)
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Review

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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceReview
Armillaria Root-Rot Pathogens: Species Boundaries and Global Distribution
Pathogens 2018, 7(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens7040083 - 24 Oct 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
This review considers current knowledge surrounding species boundaries of the Armillaria root-rot pathogens and their distribution. In addition, a phylogenetic tree using translation elongation factor subunit 1-alpha (tef-1α) from isolates across the globe are used to present a global phylogenetic framework [...] Read more.
This review considers current knowledge surrounding species boundaries of the Armillaria root-rot pathogens and their distribution. In addition, a phylogenetic tree using translation elongation factor subunit 1-alpha (tef-1α) from isolates across the globe are used to present a global phylogenetic framework for the genus. Defining species boundaries based on DNA sequence-inferred phylogenies has been a central focus of contemporary mycology. The results of such studies have in many cases resolved the biogeographic history of species, mechanisms involved in dispersal, the taxonomy of species and how certain phenotypic characteristics have evolved throughout lineage diversification. Such advances have also occurred in the case of Armillaria spp. that include important causal agents of tree root rots. This commenced with the first phylogeny for Armillaria that was based on IGS-1 (intergenic spacer region one) DNA sequence data, published in 1992. Since then phylogenies were produced using alternative loci, either as single gene phylogenies or based on concatenated data. Collectively these phylogenies revealed species clusters in Armillaria linked to their geographic distributions and importantly species complexes that warrant further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Pathogens of Forest Trees)
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