Special Issue "Advanced Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Parasitic Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2022) | Viewed by 707

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Takashi Kumagai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan
Interests: schistosomiasis; molecular diagnosis; helminthology; extracellular vesicles; RNA interference; miRNA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Schistosomiasis is one of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) defined by World Health Organization (WHO), posing a transmission risk to more than 800 million people worldwide and causing high morbidity and mortality. The WHO is implementing measures centered on MDAs with the goal of “elimination as a public health risk” by 2030. However, there is an urgent need to develop diagnostic and post-treatment monitoring methods with high sensitivity and specificity, as well as systems for monitoring infected snails. In this Special Issue, we will discuss novel and innovative human and animal diagnostic methods for schistosomiasis, including immunological diagnosis methods (ELISA, simple rapid diagnostic kits), molecular diagnosis methods (qPCR, digital-droplet PCR, LAMP, miRNA detection), and gene detection technologies for monitoring intermediate host snails (environmental DNA, risk mapping, etc.). We would appreciate your consideration of our contribution.

Dr. Takashi Kumagai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • schistosomiasis
  • diagnosis
  • ELISA
  • qPCR
  • CCA
  • qPCR
  • ddPCR
  • LAMP
  • environmental DNA
  • miRNA
  • risk mapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Detection of Schistosoma mekongi DNA in Human Stool and Intermediate Host Snail Neotricula aperta via Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay in Lao PDR
Pathogens 2022, 11(12), 1413; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11121413 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 165
Abstract
Schistosomiasis mekongi infection represents a public health concern in Laos and Cambodia. While both countries have made significant progress in disease control over the past few decades, eradication has not yet been achieved. Recently, several studies reported the application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification [...] Read more.
Schistosomiasis mekongi infection represents a public health concern in Laos and Cambodia. While both countries have made significant progress in disease control over the past few decades, eradication has not yet been achieved. Recently, several studies reported the application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detecting Schistosoma DNA in low-transmission settings. The objective of this study was to develop a LAMP assay for Schistosoma mekongi using a simple DNA extraction method. In particular, we evaluated the utility of the LAMP assay for detecting S. mekongi DNA in human stool and snail samples in endemic areas in Laos. We then used the LAMP assay results to develop a risk map for monitoring schistosomiasis mekongi and preventing epidemics. A total of 272 stool samples were collected from villagers on Khon Island in the southern part of Laos in 2016. DNA for LAMP assays was extracted via the hot-alkaline method. Following the Kato-Katz method, we determined that 0.4% (1/272) of the stool samples were positive for S. mekongi eggs, as opposed to 2.9% (8/272) for S. mekongi DNA based on the LAMP assays. Snail samples (n = 11,762) were annually collected along the riverside of Khon Island from 2016 to 2018. DNA was extracted from pooled snails as per the hot-alkaline method. The LAMP assay indicated that the prevalence of S. mekongi in snails was 0.26% in 2016, 0.08% in 2017, and less than 0.03% in 2018. Based on the LAMP assay results, a risk map for schistosomiasis with kernel density estimation was created, and the distribution of positive individuals and snails was consistent. In a subsequent survey of residents, schistosomiasis prevalence among villagers with latrines at home was lower than that among villagers without latrines. This is the first study to develop and evaluate a LAMP assay for S. mekongi detection in stools and snails. Our findings indicate that the LAMP assay is an effective method for monitoring pathogen prevalence and creating risk maps for schistosomiasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis)
Article
The Efficiency of Commercial Immunodiagnostic Assays for the Field Detection of Schistosoma japonicum Human Infections: A Meta-Analysis
Pathogens 2022, 11(7), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11070791 - 13 Jul 2022
Viewed by 417
Abstract
Although great strides have been achieved, schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public health concern in China. Immunodiagnostics have been widely accepted as the first choice in large-scale screening of Schistosoma japonicum human infections, and indirect hemagglutination test (IHA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and [...] Read more.
Although great strides have been achieved, schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public health concern in China. Immunodiagnostics have been widely accepted as the first choice in large-scale screening of Schistosoma japonicum human infections, and indirect hemagglutination test (IHA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and dipstick dye immunoassay (DDIA) are currently the three most common immunological tests for the diagnosis of S. japonicum human infections in China. This meta-analysis aimed to comprehensively assess the performance of IHA, ELISA, and DDIA for the field diagnosis of S. japonicum human infections. A total of 37 eligible publications were enrolled in the final analysis, including 29 Chinese publications and 8 English publications. No significant heterogeneities were detected among the studies reporting ELISA (I2 = 88%, p < 0.05), IHA (I2 = 95%, p < 0.05), or DDIA (I2 = 84%, p < 0.05). DDIA showed the highest pooled sensitivity (90.8%, 95% CI: 84.6% to 94.7%) and IHA presented the highest pooled specificity for detection of S. japonicum human infections (71.6%, 95% CI: 65.9% to 76.7%). Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve analysis showed that IHA exhibited the highest area under the SROC curve (AUC) (0.88, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.9), and ELISA presented the lowest AUC (0.85, 95% CI: 0.82 to 0.88). Deeks’ funnel plots indicated no publication bias. IHA presented the highest sensitivity in medium-endemicity regions and the highest specificity for diagnosis of S. japonicum human infections in low-endemicity regions, and ELISA showed the highest diagnostic sensitivity in high-endemicity regions and the highest specificity in medium-endemicity regions, while DDIA exhibited the highest diagnostic sensitivity in high-endemicity regions and the highest specificity in low-endemicity regions. IHA and DDIA presented a higher efficiency for the diagnosis of S. japonicum human infections in marshland and lake regions than in hilly and mountainous regions, while ELISA showed a comparable diagnostic sensitivity between in marshland and lake regions and hilly and mountainous regions (88.3% vs. 88.6%), and a higher specificity in marshland and lake regions than in hilly and mountainous regions (60% vs. 48%). Our meta-analysis demonstrates a comparable diagnostic accuracy of IHA, ELISA, and DDIA for S. japonicum human infections, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of IHA, ELISA, and DDIA vary in types and infection prevalence of endemic regions. DDIA combined with IHA is recommended as a tool for screening chemotherapy targets and seroepidemiological surveys during the stage moving towards schistosomiasis elimination in China. Further studies to examine the effectiveness of combinations of two or three immunological tests for diagnosis of S. japonicum human infections are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop