Special Issue "Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers""

A special issue of Particles (ISSN 2571-712X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 4760

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Diego González-Díaz
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxías (IGFAE)
Interests: gaseous detectors, neutrino physics, rare event searches
Dr. Paul Colas
E-Mail
Guest Editor
CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Saclay

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,


Since their introduction in 1974, Time Projection Chambers have played a pivotal role in landmark experiments in both particle and nuclear physics. Despite the fact that TPCs were originally devised for collider geometry, they have eventually become a synonym for the 'perfect experiment' in which maximal information about the nature of a particle's interaction needs to be obtained. This inexhaustible drive towards perfection is recognizable in many modern implementations and keeps fueling the technology beyond its original boundaries 46 years after its invention, with no sign of fatigue.

So, we are happy to announce that selected papers from the topical workshop "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers" https://indico.cern.ch/event/889369/page/19876-topical-workshop will be published in this Special Issue of Particles, an MDPI open-access journal. The papers submitted are expected to reflect original work or be a balanced review of some key TPC technological aspect. All submissions will be peer-reviewed by internationally recognized experts.

As Guest Editors, we would like to invite you to submit your unpublished and original research relevant to this topic for publication in this Special Issue of Particles. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for submissions from the workshop will be free.

Dr. Diego González-Díaz
Dr. Paul Colas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Particles is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Electrostatic Simulations for the DUNE ND-GAr Field Cage
Particles 2022, 5(2), 110-127; https://doi.org/10.3390/particles5020010 - 06 Apr 2022
Viewed by 386
Abstract
ND-GAr is one of three detector systems in the design of the DUNE Near Detector complex, which will be located on the Fermilab campus, sixty meters underground and 570 m from the source of an intense neutrino beam. ND-GAr will consist of a [...] Read more.
ND-GAr is one of three detector systems in the design of the DUNE Near Detector complex, which will be located on the Fermilab campus, sixty meters underground and 570 m from the source of an intense neutrino beam. ND-GAr will consist of a cylindrical 10-bar gaseous Argon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and a surrounding sampling electromagnetic calorimeter embedded within a superconducting solenoid, the cryostat and yoke for which together serve as the pressure vessel. While various options for the specific configuration of ND-GAr are being explored, essential design work for the detector has moved forward in recent months. This document describes basic mechanical, electrostatic, and gas flow design features of the ND-GAr TPC and presents results of electrostatic simulations of the interior of the pressure vessel for both single and dual-anode arrangements. Simulations are implemented with the Elmer finite-element software suite and related programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers")
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Track Reconstruction in a High-Density Environment with ALICE
Particles 2022, 5(1), 84-95; https://doi.org/10.3390/particles5010008 - 10 Mar 2022
Viewed by 596
Abstract
ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its main tracking and particle-identification detector is a large volume Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TPC has been designed to perform well in the high-track density environment created in high-energy [...] Read more.
ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its main tracking and particle-identification detector is a large volume Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TPC has been designed to perform well in the high-track density environment created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. In this proceeding, we describe the track reconstruction procedure in ALICE. In particular, we focus on the two main challenges that were faced during the Run 2 data-taking period (2015–2018) of the LHC, which were the baseline fluctuations and the local space charge distortions in the TPC. We present the corresponding solutions in detail and describe the software tools that allowed us to circumvent these challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers")
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Techniques for TPC Calibration: Application to Liquid Ar-TPCs
Particles 2022, 5(1), 74-83; https://doi.org/10.3390/particles5010007 - 23 Feb 2022
Viewed by 658
Abstract
Large liquid argon TPCs are playing an increasingly important role in neutrino physics, and their calibration will be an essential component of their capability to reach the required performance and precision. Natural sources are extensively used but present limitations, since natural radioactivity from [...] Read more.
Large liquid argon TPCs are playing an increasingly important role in neutrino physics, and their calibration will be an essential component of their capability to reach the required performance and precision. Natural sources are extensively used but present limitations, since natural radioactivity from 39Ar is of low energy, and the rate of cosmic ray muons is low when the detectors are placed deep underground. Argon gas TPCs have been calibrated with ionizing laser beams for several decades, and more recently the technique has been further developed for use in liquid TPCs. Other recent ideas include the use of external neutron generators creating pulses that propagate into the detector. This paper reviews the development of the laser and neutron methods for the calibration of argon TPCs and describes their planned implementation in the upcoming DUNE experiment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers")
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Directional Dark Matter Searches with CYGNO
Particles 2021, 4(3), 343-353; https://doi.org/10.3390/particles4030029 - 06 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1258
Abstract
The CYGNO project aims at developing a high resolution Time Projection Chamber with optical readout for directional dark matter searches and solar neutrino spectroscopy. Peculiar CYGNO’s features are the 3D tracking capability provided by the combination of photomultipliers and scientific CMOS camera signals, [...] Read more.
The CYGNO project aims at developing a high resolution Time Projection Chamber with optical readout for directional dark matter searches and solar neutrino spectroscopy. Peculiar CYGNO’s features are the 3D tracking capability provided by the combination of photomultipliers and scientific CMOS camera signals, combined with a helium-fluorine-based gas mixture at atmospheric pressure amplified by gas electron multipliers structures. In this paper, the performances achieved with CYGNO prototypes and the prospects for the upcoming underground installation at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of a 50-L detector in fall 2021 will be discussed, together with the plans for a 1-m3 experiment. The synergy with the ERC consolidator, grant project INITIUM, aimed at realising negative ion drift operation within the CYGNO 3D optical approach, will be further illustrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers")
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Compact Muon Tracker for Dynamic Tomography of Density Based on a Thin Time Projection Chamber with Micromegas Readout
Particles 2021, 4(3), 333-342; https://doi.org/10.3390/particles4030028 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 973
Abstract
Tomography based on cosmic muon absorption is a rising technique because of its versatility and its consolidation as a geophysics tool over the past decade. It allows us to address major societal issues such as long-term stability of natural and man-made large infrastructures [...] Read more.
Tomography based on cosmic muon absorption is a rising technique because of its versatility and its consolidation as a geophysics tool over the past decade. It allows us to address major societal issues such as long-term stability of natural and man-made large infrastructures or sustainable underwater management. Traditionally, muon trackers consist of hodoscopes or multilayer detectors. For applications with challenging available volumes or the wide field of view required, a thin time projection chamber (TPC) associated with a Micromegas readout plane can provide a good tradeoff between compactness and performance. This paper details the design of such a TPC aiming at maximizing primary signal and minimizing track reconstruction artifacts. The results of the measurements performed during a case study addressing the aforementioned applications are discussed. The current works lines and perspectives of the project are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from "New Horizons in Time Projection Chambers")
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop