Special Issue "Scanning Probe Spectroscopy: From Radio- to Terahertz Frequencies"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Reinhold Koch
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz, Austria
Interests: radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscopy; electron and nuclear spin excitation in single molecules; functional molecules ferromagnet/semiconductor hetero-and nanostructures; magnetologic; stress and magnetostriction of thin epitaxial films; self organization of surfaces and heterostructures
Prof. Dr. Stefan Müllegger
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz, Austria
Interests: radio-frequency scanning tunneling spectroscopy (rf-STS); molecule-based hybrid nanostructures; experimental nanophysics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increasing importance of nanosciences in daily life and technology, there is a strong demand for new investigation tools that have the precision needed for studying and controlling the quantum physical and chemical properties of nanoscale objects. Since the early 1980s, a variety of scanning probe techniques have been established as leading experimental tools in their fields of research. This has enabled the determination and control of, for example, the geometric, electronic, magnetic, and chemical structure of single-crystal surfaces and adsorbates, artificial quantum dots, nanowires and -islands with atomic-scale spatial resolution, and, more recently, even of single atoms and molecules.  

The energy-resolution limit of the established scanning probe spectroscopy techniques—presently ≈0.1 meV—remains among the biggest challenges. Recent spectroscopic resonance experiments utilize either high-frequency AC voltages or THz-laser irradiation. The respective resonance energies range between about 40 neV and a few meV. These novel approaches have revolutionized the field of scanning probe spectroscopy by improving the energy resolution up to 104 times and the sensitivity down to the detection-limit of single spins. Recent studies demonstrate, e.g., the electron and nuclear spin resonance (ESR, NMR), as well as electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) of single atoms and molecules, the excitation of mechanical vibrations in molecules, molecular chains and surface layers, or the detection of subsurface dopants in semiconductors.  

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials attempts to cover the most recent advances in the field of scanning probe spectroscopy operating at resonance frequencies of MHz to THz. Submissions of regular as well as review articles are appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Reinhold Koch
Prof. Dr. Stefan Müllegger
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Single-spin excitation and detection 
  • Mechanical excitation of nanoscale objects (atoms, molecules, clusters, surfaces) 
  • Noise spectroscopy and stochastic resonance 
  • (Sub)surface material characterization 
  • Advances of instrumentation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Towards Laterally Resolved Ferromagnetic Resonance with Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060827 - 31 May 2019
Abstract
We used a homodyne detection to investigate the gyration of magnetic vortex cores in Fe islands on W(110) with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. The technique aims at local detection of the spin precession as a function of frequency using [...] Read more.
We used a homodyne detection to investigate the gyration of magnetic vortex cores in Fe islands on W(110) with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. The technique aims at local detection of the spin precession as a function of frequency using a radio-frequency (rf) modulation of the tunneling bias voltage. The gyration was excited by the resulting spin-polarized rf current in the tunneling junction. A theoretical analysis of different contributions to the frequency-dependent signals expected in this technique is given. These include, besides the ferromagnetic resonance signal, also signals caused by the non-linearity of the I ( U ) characteristics. The vortex gyration was modeled with micromagnetic finite element methods using realistic parameters for the tunneling current, its spin polarization, and the island shape, and simulations were compared with the experimental results. The observed signals are presented and critically analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Scanning Probe Spectroscopy: From Radio- to Terahertz Frequencies)
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