Nano-Bio Hybrid Systems for Biomimetic Applications

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 4011

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: multiscale computation; graphene; self-assembly monolayers; light harvesting proteins; fluorophores; lipid bilayers

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: computational chemistry; catalysis; molecular modeling; nanoscience; physical and organic chemistry; olefin metathesis; green chemistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, immense research effort has been devoted to the generation of hybrid materials which change the electronic properties of one constituent by changing the optoelectronic properties of another. The most appealing approach to design such materials relies on the combination of organic materials with biological systems like redox-active proteins. Despite strong advances in the field, the efficiency of the final devices is usually very low due to two main problems related to the interfacing of such different materials: charge recombination at the interface and the high possibility of losing the function of the biological component, which leads to inactivation of the entire device. The present Special Issue of Nanomaterials is aimed at presenting and giving a balanced view of the current state-of-the-art and recent advances in the field of nano-bio hybrid materials that can be used as bio-sensors, bio-fuel cells, biohybrid photoelectrochemical cells, and nanostructured photoelectronic devices. Experimental as well as theoretical contributions are welcome, including full papers, communications, and reviews to obtain a complete snapshot of the ongoing research activity.

Dr. Silvio Osella
Dr. Bartosz Trzaskowski
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nano-bio materials
  • direct electron transport
  • charge separation
  • solar fuel production
  • coupled electron-proton transfer
  • semi-artificial photosynthesis
  • photoelectrochemistry
  • bio-hybrid photovoltaic devices

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

37 pages, 6308 KiB  
Review
Artificial Photosynthesis: Is Computation Ready for the Challenge Ahead?
by Silvio Osella
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(2), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11020299 - 24 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3328
Abstract
A tremendous effort is currently devoted to the generation of novel hybrid materials with enhanced electronic properties for the creation of artificial photosynthetic systems. This compelling and challenging problem is well-defined from an experimental point of view, as the design of such materials [...] Read more.
A tremendous effort is currently devoted to the generation of novel hybrid materials with enhanced electronic properties for the creation of artificial photosynthetic systems. This compelling and challenging problem is well-defined from an experimental point of view, as the design of such materials relies on combining organic materials or metals with biological systems like light harvesting and redox-active proteins. Such hybrid systems can be used, e.g., as bio-sensors, bio-fuel cells, biohybrid photoelectrochemical cells, and nanostructured photoelectronic devices. Despite these efforts, the main bottleneck is the formation of efficient interfaces between the biological and the organic/metal counterparts for efficient electron transfer (ET). It is within this aspect that computation can make the difference and improve the current understanding of the mechanisms underneath the interface formation and the charge transfer efficiency. Yet, the systems considered (i.e., light harvesting protein, self-assembly monolayer and surface assembly) are more and more complex, reaching (and often passing) the limit of current computation power. In this review, recent developments in computational methods for studying complex interfaces for artificial photosynthesis will be provided and selected cases discussed, to assess the inherent ability of computation to leave a mark in this field of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Bio Hybrid Systems for Biomimetic Applications)
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