Special Issue "Advances in Micro/Nanomotors"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Beatriz Jurado Sánchez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Alcalá, Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona, Km. 33.600, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain
Tel. +34 918856392
Interests: nanotechnology; micromotors; sensors; analytical chemistry; quantum dots; 2D nanomaterials; carbon nanomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Self-propelled micro and nanomotors are nanoscale devices capable of converting energy into movement and forces. The self-propelled structure can be equipped with sensing and actuating attachments to perform myriad complex tasks. Nanomotors are currently the subject of intense interest due to their potential applications in nanomachinery, nanomedicine, fluidic systems, nanoscale transport, and assembly. The type of nanomaterial used in their fabrication plays a critical role in future functionality, enabling important biomedical, analytical, and environmental applications.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the most recent and promising technologies in nano- and micromotors, their materials, fabrication, and applications. Reviews, original research papers, and communications are all welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  1. Micro- and nanomaterials for micromotor fabrication.
  2. Role of micro- and nanomaterials in micromotor propulsion.
  3. Recent advances in fuel-free (magnetic and light-propelled) micromotors.
  4. Applications in analytical sensing, biomedicine, or environmental remediation.

Prof. Beatriz Jurado Sánchez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Micromotors
  • Nanomotors
  • Self-propulsion
  • Nanomaterials
  • Fuel-free
  • Magnetic propulsion
  • Might propulsion
  • Sensing
  • Biomedicine
  • Environmental remediation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Self-Propelled Janus Microdimer Swimmers under a Rotating Magnetic Field
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1672; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121672 - 22 Nov 2019
Abstract
Recent strides in micro- and nanofabrication technology have enabled researchers to design and develop new micro- and nanorobots for biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Due to its non-invasive remote actuation and convenient navigation abilities, magnetic propulsion has been widely used in micro- and nanoscale [...] Read more.
Recent strides in micro- and nanofabrication technology have enabled researchers to design and develop new micro- and nanorobots for biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Due to its non-invasive remote actuation and convenient navigation abilities, magnetic propulsion has been widely used in micro- and nanoscale robotic systems. In this article, a highly efficient Janus microdimer swimmer propelled by a rotating uniform magnetic field was investigated experimentally and numerically. The velocity of the Janus microdimer swimmer can be modulated by adjusting the magnetic field frequency with a maximum speed of 133 μm·s−1 (≈13.3 body length s−1) at the frequency of 32 Hz. Fast and accurate navigation of these Janus microdimer swimmers in complex environments and near obstacles was also demonstrated. This efficient propulsion behavior of the new Janus microdimer swimmer holds considerable promise for diverse future practical applications ranging from nanoscale manipulation and assembly to nanomedicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Micro/Nanomotors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Self-Propulsion Strategies for Artificial Cell-Like Compartments
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121680 - 25 Nov 2019
Abstract
Reconstitution of life-like properties in artificial cells is a current research frontier in synthetic biology. Mimicking metabolism, growth, and sensing are active areas of investigation; however, achieving motility and directional taxis are also challenging in the context of artificial cells. To tackle this [...] Read more.
Reconstitution of life-like properties in artificial cells is a current research frontier in synthetic biology. Mimicking metabolism, growth, and sensing are active areas of investigation; however, achieving motility and directional taxis are also challenging in the context of artificial cells. To tackle this problem, recent progress has been made that leverages the tools of active matter physics in synthetic biology. This review surveys the most significant achievements in designing motile cell-like compartments. In this context, strategies for self-propulsion are summarized, including, compartmentalization of catalytically active particles, phoretic propulsion of vesicles and emulsion droplet motion driven by Marangoni flows. This work showcases how the realization of motile protocells may impact biomedical engineering while also aiming at answering fundamental questions in locomotion of prebiotic cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Micro/Nanomotors)
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