Controversy about the Origin of the Broad Emission Band in Photoactive Perovskite Materials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics Materials and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 4470

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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia Molecular (ICMol), Universidad de Valencia, Catedrático José Beltrán 2, Paterna, Spain
Interests: perovskite nanoparticles; gold nanoclusters; upconversion nanomaterials; hybrid nanomaterials; photocatalysis
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia Molecular (ICMol), Universidad de Valencia, Catedrático José Beltrán 2, Paterna, Spain
Interests: photoactive nanoparticles; quantum dots; surface chemistry; perovskites nanomaterials; photochemistry; photocatalysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal halide perovskites have attracted great attention in lighting due to their excellent photophysical properties: broad absorption range; high absorption coefficient; a characteristic narrow emission band assigned to the direct exciton recombination, and a small energy shift between the absorption and emission peak positions. These materials can also exhibit a broad and strong Stokes-shifted emission, which is relevant for white-light generation. There is some controversy about the origin of this broad emission, and it has been ascribed to self-trapped excitons (STE) due to the strong carrier–phonon interactions, and/or to defect/impurity-bound excitons in-gap states.

This Special Issue will report on how to prepare customized emissive perovskite materials by providing experimental and theoretical studies that can help to understand the relationship between the observed broad emission and the perovskite’s dimensionality, composition, and crystal structure distortion. This knowledge will boost the development of efficient, broad-emissive perovskites of interest for white-light illumination, among other applications.

We encourage authors to submit studies related to this topic, involving lead and lead-free halide perovskites (solids and colloids) of different dimensionality (3D, 2D, 1D, and 0D) and composition, as well as metal-doped perovskites. It is highly recommended that authors include photoluminescence efficiency, as well as thermal, chemical, and photochemical stability information of the materials. Original contributions and/or perspectives are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Julia Pérez-Prieto
Dr. Raquel E. Galian
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Self-trapping exciton
  • Defect-assisted emission
  • Exciton recombination
  • Photoluminescence efficiency
  • Theoretical calculation
  • Crystal structure dimensionality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 2632 KiB  
Article
Accelerated Formation of 2D Ruddlesden—Popper Perovskite Thin Films by Lewis Bases for High Efficiency Solar Cell Applications
by Swathi M. Gowdru, Jou-Chun Lin, Szu-Tan Wang, Yi-Chia Chen, Kuan-Chang Wu, Cheng-Nan Jiang, Yu-Dian Chen, Shao-Sian Li, Yuan Jay Chang and Di-Yan Wang
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(11), 1816; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12111816 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2169
Abstract
Various types of 2D organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells have been developed and investigated due to better electron transport behavior and environmental stability. Controlling the formation of phases in the 2D perovskite films has been considered to play an important role in influencing the [...] Read more.
Various types of 2D organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells have been developed and investigated due to better electron transport behavior and environmental stability. Controlling the formation of phases in the 2D perovskite films has been considered to play an important role in influencing the stability of perovskite materials and their performance in optoelectronic applications. In this work, Lewis base urea was used as an effective additive for the formation of 2D Ruddlesden—Popper (RP) perovskite (BA)2(MA)n−1PbnI3n+1 thin film with mixed phases (n = 2~4). The detailed structural morphology of the 2D perovskite thin film was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and photoluminescence mapping. The results indicated that the urea additive could facilitate the formation of 2D RP perovskite thin film with larger grain size and high crystallinity. The 2D RP perovskite thin films for solar cells exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.9% under AM 1.5G illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Full article
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Review

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17 pages, 3039 KiB  
Review
Recent Progress in Lanthanide-Doped Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals and Nanoheterostructures: A Future Vision of Bioimaging
by Gowri Manohari Arumugam, Santhosh Kumar Karunakaran, Raquel E. Galian and Julia Pérez-Prieto
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(13), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12132130 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2625
Abstract
All-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals have great potential in optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, their biological applications have not been explored much owing to their poor stability and shallow penetration depth of ultraviolet (UV) excitation light into tissues. Interestingly, the combination of all-inorganic halide [...] Read more.
All-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals have great potential in optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, their biological applications have not been explored much owing to their poor stability and shallow penetration depth of ultraviolet (UV) excitation light into tissues. Interestingly, the combination of all-inorganic halide perovskite nanocrystals (IHP NCs) with nanoparticles consisting of lanthanide-doped matrix (Ln NPs, such as NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs) is stable, near-infrared (NIR) excitable and emission tuneable (up-shifting emission), all of them desirable properties for biological applications. In addition, luminescence in inorganic perovskite nanomaterials has recently been sensitized via lanthanide doping. In this review, we discuss the progress of various Ln-doped all-inorganic halide perovskites (LnIHP). The unique properties of nanoheterostructures based on the interaction between IHP NCs and Ln NPs as well as those of LnIHP NCs are also detailed. Moreover, a systematic discussion of basic principles and mechanisms as well as of the recent advancements in bio-imaging based on these materials are presented. Finally, the challenges and future perspectives of bio-imaging based on NIR-triggered sensitized luminescence of IHP NCs are discussed. Full article
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