Special Issue "Potential of Electrospun Nanofibrous Devices: Design and Validation under a Multiapplication Perspective"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 August 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jose D. Badia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: biopolymers; biocomposites; degradation; stability; material valorisation; energy valorisation; biological valorisation; electrospinning; nanofibrous scaffolds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue of Nanomaterials is aimed at presenting the current state of the art in the preparation of electrospun nanofibrous devices, which represents remarkable progress made in recent years in the technology of membranes or scaffolds, with many different types of electrospun devices exhibiting radically enhanced properties for a wide range of industrial applications, such as biomedicine, environmental remediation, fuel cells, and food packaging, among others.

This Special Issue aims at collecting recent findings and comprehensive reviews from experts in this very active field of research, in order to serve as a useful source of information for researchers and technologists.

Contributions from leading groups in the field are invited for this Special Issue, with the aim of giving a balanced view of the current state of the art in this discipline. It is focused on the design, preparation, and validation of novel electrospun devices to respond to the outcome-oriented requirements of the intended application. It also covers proposals of innovative electrospinning-based procedures and original methodological approaches for the improvement of aspects such as the security, compatibility, sustainability, degradation, and stability of the electrospun devices.

Dr. Jose D. Badia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrospinning
  • Electrospun nanofibrous device
  • Scaffold
  • Technology of membranes
  • Design-to-validation
  • Security
  • Compatibility
  • Sustainability
  • Degradation
  • Stability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Antimicrobial Nanofiber Based Filters for High Filtration Efficiency Respirators
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(4), 900; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11040900 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 963
Abstract
Electrospinning has been used to develop and upscale polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers as effective aerosol filtration materials for their potential use in respirators. The fibers were deposited onto non-woven spunbond polypropylene (SPP) and the basis weight (grammage, g/m2) was varied to assess [...] Read more.
Electrospinning has been used to develop and upscale polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers as effective aerosol filtration materials for their potential use in respirators. The fibers were deposited onto non-woven spunbond polypropylene (SPP) and the basis weight (grammage, g/m2) was varied to assess the resulting effect on filtration efficiency and breathing resistance of the materials. The results indicated that a basis weight in excess of 0.4 g/m2 of PAN electrospun fibers yielded a filtration efficiency over 97%, with breathing resistance values that increased proportionally with the amount of basis weight added. With the aim of retaining filter efficiency whilst lowering breathing resistance, the basis weight of 0.4 g/m2 and 0.8 g/m2 of PAN electrospun fibers were strategically split up and stacked with SPP in different configurations. The results suggested that a symmetric structure based on SPP/PAN/PAN/SPP was the optimal structure, as it reduces SPP consumption while maintaining an FFP2-type of filtration efficiency, while reducing breathing resistance, specially at high air flow rates, such as those mimicking FFP2 exhalation conditions. The incorporation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles within the electrospun nanofibers in the form of nanocomposites, retained the high filtration characteristics of the unfilled filter, while exhibiting a strong bactericidal capacity, even after short contact times. This study demonstrates the potential of using the symmetric splitting of the PAN nanofibers layer as a somewhat more efficient configuration in the design of filters for respirators. Full article
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Article
Development of Epidermal Equivalent from Electrospun Synthetic Polymers for In Vitro Irritation/Corrosion Testing
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2528; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122528 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 666
Abstract
The development of products for topical applications requires analyses of their skin effects before they are destined for the market. At present, the ban on animal use in several tests makes the search for in vitro models (such as artificial skin) necessary to [...] Read more.
The development of products for topical applications requires analyses of their skin effects before they are destined for the market. At present, the ban on animal use in several tests makes the search for in vitro models (such as artificial skin) necessary to characterize the risks involved. In this work, tissue engineering concepts were used to manufacture collagen-free three-dimensional scaffolds for cell growth and proliferation. Two different human skin models—reconstructed human epidermis and full-thickness skin—were developed from electrospun scaffolds using synthetic polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate, polybutylene terephthalate, and nylon 6/6. After the construction of these models, their histology was analyzed by H&E staining and immunohistochemistry. The results revealed a reconstructed epidermal tissue, duly stratified, obtained from the nylon scaffold. In this model, the presence of proteins involved in the epidermis stratification process (cytokeratin 14, cytokeratin 10, involucrin, and loricrin) was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The nylon reconstructed human epidermis model’s applicability was evaluated as a platform to perform irritation and corrosion tests. Our results demonstrated that this model is a promising platform to assess the potential of dermal irritation/corrosion of chemical products. Full article
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Article
Performance of Polyester-Based Electrospun Scaffolds under In Vitro Hydrolytic Conditions: From Short-Term to Long-Term Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 786; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050786 - 22 May 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1515
Abstract
The evaluation of the performance of polyesters under in vitro physiologic conditions is essential to design scaffolds with an adequate lifespan for a given application. In this line, the degradation-durability patterns of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), polydioxanone (PDO), polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) scaffolds were [...] Read more.
The evaluation of the performance of polyesters under in vitro physiologic conditions is essential to design scaffolds with an adequate lifespan for a given application. In this line, the degradation-durability patterns of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), polydioxanone (PDO), polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) scaffolds were monitored and compared giving, as a result, a basis for the specific design of scaffolds from short-term to long-term applications. For this purpose, they were immersed in ultra-pure water and phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at 37 °C. The scaffolds for short-time applications were PLGA and PDO, in which the molar mass diminished down to 20% in a 20–30 days lifespan. While PDO developed crystallinity that prevented the geometry of the fibres, those of PLGA coalesced and collapsed. The scaffolds for long-term applications were PCL and PHB, in which the molar mass followed a progressive decrease, reaching values of 10% for PCL and almost 50% for PHB after 650 days of immersion. This resistant pattern was mainly ascribed to the stability of the crystalline domains of the fibres, in which the diameters remained almost unaffected. From the perspective of an adequate balance between the durability and degradation, this study may serve technologists as a reference point to design polyester-based scaffolds for biomedical applications. Full article
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