Special Issue "New Horizon in Cellulose Nanofiber and Its Materials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Masaya Nogi
Website
Guest Editor
Osaka University, Suita, Japan
Interests: cellulose nanofiber materials, wood science, flexible eletrinics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) are lightweight and strong nanofibers made from plants. It is typically made by wood pulp, which is further fibrillated to nano levels to make cellulose nanofibers.

In the last decade, the polymer composites reinforced with CNFs have received as much attention as structural materials. Cars made by CNFs, or Nano Cellulose Vehicles, were first released in the Tokyo Motor Show 2019. Over twenty Japanese organizations, including universities, research institutes, and automotive manufacturers, worked together to put the technology to practical use. This achievement was born from some scientific articles about the cellulose nanofiber research.

As you know, CNFs number their light weight and high strength among their properties; they may be applied in polymer composites and vehicles. The latest CNF research has discovered new knowledge or technologies of nanofibrillation reactions, the properties of suspension, the compounding processes, and advanced applications for energy and electronics and so on. Now, we believe, this Special Issue containing your results and opinions will open the next horizon of CNF research and take on the challenge of achieving the SDGs.

This Special Issue aims to cover a broad range of CNFs and their materials from academic or industrial scientific views. Perspectives, review articles, full paper, short communication, and technical papers on this topic are welcome.

Prof. Masaya Nogi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evaluations of nanocellulose (cellulose nanofiber, cellulose nanocrystals, micro-fibrillated cellulose, bacterial cellulose)
  • lignocellulose and related biopolymers
  • nanofibrillation process and the starting pulps or plants
  • nanocellulose suspensions and emulsions
  • polymers composites: their compounding process and the mechanical properties
  • functional nanocellulose materials by adding of organic/inorganic materials
  • nanocellulose film or foams: their process, properties and applications
  • advanced nanocellulose applications for energy, electric device, clean water, human health, sustainable life below water and on land

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Checkered Films of Multiaxis Oriented Nanocelluloses by Liquid-Phase Three-Dimensional Patterning
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 958; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050958 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
It is essential to build multiaxis oriented nanocellulose films in the plane for developing thermal or optical management films. However, using conventional orientation techniques, it is difficult to align nanocelluloses in multiple directions within the plane of single films rather than in the [...] Read more.
It is essential to build multiaxis oriented nanocellulose films in the plane for developing thermal or optical management films. However, using conventional orientation techniques, it is difficult to align nanocelluloses in multiple directions within the plane of single films rather than in the thickness direction like the chiral nematic structure. In this study, we developed the liquid-phase three-dimensional (3D) patterning technique by combining wet spinning and 3D printing. Using this technique, we produced a checkered film with multiaxis oriented nanocelluloses. This film showed similar retardation levels, but with orthogonal molecular axis orientations in each checkered domain as programmed. The thermal transport was enhanced in the domain with the oriented pattern parallel to the heat flow. This liquid-phase 3D patterning technique could pave the way for bottom-up design of differently aligned nanocellulose films to develop sophisticated optical and thermal materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Horizon in Cellulose Nanofiber and Its Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanical Characterization on Solvent Treated Cellulose Nanofiber Preforms Using Solution Dipping–Hot Press Technique
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050841 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
Nanocomposites films were prepared by impregnating the solvent treated cellulose nanofiber (SCNF) preforms with epoxy resin using a solution dipping–hot press technique. We investigated the effect of SCNF preforms porosity on the amount of impregnated resin and tensile properties of the corresponding nanocomposites [...] Read more.
Nanocomposites films were prepared by impregnating the solvent treated cellulose nanofiber (SCNF) preforms with epoxy resin using a solution dipping–hot press technique. We investigated the effect of SCNF preforms porosity on the amount of impregnated resin and tensile properties of the corresponding nanocomposites films. The porosity of the CNF preforms was successfully controlled using the solvent exchange with varying CNF concentration. The impregnated resin amount increased as the SCNF preforms porosity increased, respectively. Resulting nanocomposite films showed higher mechanical properties than that of the SCNF preforms. The best mechanical properties of composites were found with the combination of 1 wt % SCNF preform and low viscosity epoxy, exhibiting tensile strength and Young’s modulus of 77 MPa and 4.8 GPa, respectively. The composite also showed high fiber volume fraction of more than 60%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Horizon in Cellulose Nanofiber and Its Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Dear Colleagues,

Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) are lightweight and strong nanofibers made from plants. It is typically made by wood pulp, which is further fibrillated to nano levels to make cellulose nanofibers.

In the last decade, the polymer composites reinforced with CNFs have received as much attention as structural materials. Cars made by CNFs, or Nano Cellulose Vehicles, were first released in the Tokyo Motor Show 2019. Over twenty Japanese organizations, including universities, research institutes, and automotive manufacturers, worked together to put the technology to practical use. This achievement was born from some scientific articles about the cellulose nanofiber research.

As you know, CNFs number their light weight and high strength among their properties; they may be applied in polymer composites and vehicles. The latest CNF research has discovered new knowledge or technologies of nanofibrillation reactions, the properties of suspension, the compounding processes, and advanced applications for energy and electronics and so on. Now, we believe, this Special Issue containing your results and opinions will open the next horizon of CNF research and take on the challenge of achieving the SDGs.

This Special Issue aims to cover a broad range of CNFs and their materials from academic or industrial scientific views. Perspectives, review articles, full paper, short communication, and technical papers on this topic are welcome.

Prof. Masaya Nogi
Guest Editor

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